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DBS device and the smart meter grid


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#1 linda

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 11:15 AM

Dear Doctor,

I was supposed to have DBS last year but my husband and I moved to Florida and I did not have the surgery. I since have found a new doctor and he is going to watch me. Meanwhile, FPL is putting smart meters up in the neighborhood but they did not put one up on my home because I asked them the questions, "Is the DBS device compatible with the smart grid once the grid is up and running with the security and the retrofitted attachments? What is the cummulative and long term effects?" Remember, I am talking about the smart grid, not the smart meter. Since FLP could not answer my questions, I called Medtronic and they cannot give me a defenitive answer either. I am really concerned that PD people will have the operation and then find out that they cannot live in their own house. There are no smart grid standards (just google: smart grid standards). No one seems to care. Could you please look into this? Let me know if you have any questions... thank you so much I feel like I am living in a Kafka novel.... as I have spent 7 weeks calling government agencies, parkinson's groups, etc.

#2 Dr. Okun

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 03:13 AM

It will take a very powerful magnetic field to make a difference with DBS devices and therefore at the current time we are not worried about smart grids. Keep us posted!
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips

#3 netgypsy

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 12:02 PM

People who have had dbs have a device that allows them to turn the unit back on if it is inadvertently turned off. I know of two cases where this did happen for no known reason and the first was discovered quickly and the unit turned back on, the other went for a couple of weeks and then was turned back on. Neither had any problems. Wouldn't it be possible for the person with dbs to visit a house that has one and just see if there is any affect? Do understand that turning off the unit is not catastrophic unless it happens in the middle of a street or something. When patients with dbs go in for a monthly "tuneup", on occasion they have to go in with no meds and the unit off over night and our family members manage fine. Yes it's a lot harder but doable. So IF the grid does turn the unit off, you just turn it back on. No big deal for most people but of course PD is individual and we'd certainly be interested in what you learn about the smart grids. As far as the system actually affecting the signal to the brain I would find that really unlikely but of course check it out. Believe it or not I was told that a defibrillator can actually be used without turning off the dbs and the main risk is to the battery, not to the person's brain. And this is a serious jolt. More than I would expect from any smart grid turning power on and off and monitoring usage. Medtronic would have to say they don't know IF they haven't studied it but ask a physicist about a comparison of the magnetic field from the smart grid compared to a defibrilator. And what about the shock you get from your car in the winter? Magnetic fields are caused by accelerating charge particles. The more particles and the faster they accelerate, the bigger the field. Hard to imagine the smart grid produces more than static or defib or your speaker magnets on a huge sound system or electromagnets in a variety of places. But please share your research. This is very interesting.

#4 Dr. Okun

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:02 PM

You can in fact take an access review and check to see whether a magnetic field has turned you on or off and also try to determine what is turning you on and off. This is why we recommend patients carry their access review with them.

I will post for you.

One more thought.

Even if there was a single spot in the house that theoretically had a big magnetic field (e.g. a freezer with magnetics); once you identify it you can avoid it.
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips

#5 linda

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 05:12 PM

Dear Doctor,

The problem is that Smart meter grids in the home will turn every single appliance into the equivalent of a transmitting cell phone------ that's every microwave oven, stove, washing machine, clothes dryer. air conditioner, computer, etc. Each appliance in a smart meter home will be retrofitted with an antenna or the home oners will have to buy new appliances with the antennas already equipped. The cumulative and long term 24/7 exposure of radio frequencies will be pulsed several times a minute. Meanwhile, all transmitters inside a person's home will be communicating with the smart meter on the outside of the home. The outside meter will either transmit info at a higher frequency to a central hub in the neighborhood or info may be bounced from house meter to house meter and accumulating with neighbor's RF.

At the same time, the meters and antennas will act as tranceivers, allowing the home owner (via phone or computer) and the electric company to remotely control the home appliances.

The above is the Smart Meter plan: inside and outside the house. The last touch is security to protect hackers from stealing your personal electrical info --I have no idea how that works. If you wish to know more, google: smart meter grid companies. I have personally talked to Silver Spring Networks and have downloaded their White Papers: two of the most interesting papers are: WHY UNLICENSED SPECTRUM DOMINATES THE SMART GRID and SMART GRID SECURITY: MYTHS vs. REALITY
My search began with a simple question and since no one has given me an answer in 7 weeks, I know 2 facts for sure: FPL did not give me a smart meter, and there are no studies done on medical implant devices(such as DBS) interaction with a smart grid. I welcome any mor info.

Thanks for reading this............. I feel like I am in a Kafka novel.........MY ONE WISH IS THAT NO ONE WITH A PACEMAKER, DBS, PUMP,ETC IS EVER HARMED BY A SMART GRID.

#6 Dr. Okun

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 01:04 AM

I understand your concern.

I think DBS will be ok with this sort of system.

I will post for you and wish you luck in your quest.
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips




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