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#121 CynthiaM

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 03:40 PM

According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 2.4 million Americans used prescription drugs non-medically for the first time within the past year, which averages to approximately 6,600 initiates per day.

According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2.4 million Americans aged 12 or older used marijuana for the first time in the 12 months prior to being surveyed.

How many people died from the use of prescription drugs? According to the CDC, Prescription painkiller overdoses killed nearly 15,000 people in the US in 2008.(The last year that had the numbers available.) Those 15,000 were people that died from overdoses only. If you added in all of the people killed in accidents while under the influence, the number goes much higher.

How many people died from the use of marijuana?
Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass......It's about learning to dance in the rain.

#122 Luthersfaith

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:22 PM

I personally think all recreational drug usage is not good for anyone... alcohol included.
"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

#123 KiminJapan

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:52 PM

Medical marijuana, which is what this topic is about, is hardly recreational. Of course there are some who take advantage of the system, but that is certainly not limited to marijuana. There are plenty of legal prescription drugs that have far more serious and/or dangerous side effects than marijuana.

You appear to be stuck in the "if it's legal it must be aafe and if it's illegal it must be dangerous" mindset, which in reality is quite far from the truth. Some people will always use things other than as directed - even cars for example. Drive over the speed limit? Or milk - drink it after the "best by" date? Once there is a role or limitation on anything that rule is bound to be broken.

But back on topic - look closely. Legality of drugs is not a safety barometer.

#124 Luthersfaith

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 07:35 PM

1333407174[/url]' post='47174']
Medical marijuana, which is what this topic is about, is hardly recreational. Of course there are some who take advantage of the system, but that is certainly not limited to marijuana. There are plenty of legal prescription drugs that have far more serious and/or dangerous side effects than marijuana.

You appear to be stuck in the "if it's legal it must be aafe and if it's illegal it must be dangerous" mindset, which in reality is quite far from the truth. Some people will always use things other than as directed - even cars for example. Drive over the speed limit? Or milk - drink it after the "best by" date? Once there is a role or limitation on anything that rule is bound to be broken.

But back on topic - look closely. Legality of drugs is not a safety barometer.


You are correct.

"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

#125 CynthiaM

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 02:38 AM

You are correct.


If she is correct, and we all know that millions of people already use marijuana in a recreational manner, regardless of the legality....why can't patients use it legally under a doctor's supervision? Where is the logic?
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#126 CynthiaM

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 02:55 AM

I have another question. For those of you that are parents/grandparents, IF a teenager or young adult that you know and love was going to use 1)a prescription drug, 2)alcohol or 3)marijuana in an abusive manner for recreational purposes, which would you rather see them using? I am not saying I'd ever condone or encourage any of the above. After raising 5 children into adulthood, I know that at some point no matter what you want, or what you taught your children and no matter how much you pray, there comes a time where you can't determine the path that another person will choose.

To answer my own question, I'd have to say I'd choose the 3rd. Some of my reasoning would be, that I've never known of anyone getting under the influence of marijuana and then beating their kid half to death, plenty of alcoholics do just that. As a former EMT I saw first hand what a prescription drug overdose can do. I never had a patient that overdosed on marijuana. Also never worked a vehicle accident where we said "oh they wrecked because they were smoking marijuana" but had a lot of drunk drivers. Also alcohol often gets mixed with marijuana and/or prescription drugs. The mixture of alcohol and prescription drugs can be lethal all by itself, no auto accident needed. I don't think you could say the same thing about mixing alcohol and marijuana.
Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass......It's about learning to dance in the rain.

#127 Luthersfaith

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 02:34 PM

I have another question. For those of you that are parents/grandparents, IF a teenager or young adult that you know and love was going to use 1)a prescription drug, 2)alcohol or 3)marijuana in an abusive manner for recreational purposes, which would you rather see them using? I am not saying I'd ever condone or encourage any of the above. After raising 5 children into adulthood, I know that at some point no matter what you want, or what you taught your children and no matter how much you pray, there comes a time where you can't determine the path that another person will choose.

To answer my own question, I'd have to say I'd choose the 3rd. Some of my reasoning would be, that I've never known of anyone getting under the influence of marijuana and then beating their kid half to death, plenty of alcoholics do just that. As a former EMT I saw first hand what a prescription drug overdose can do. I never had a patient that overdosed on marijuana. Also never worked a vehicle accident where we said "oh they wrecked because they were smoking marijuana" but had a lot of drunk drivers. Also alcohol often gets mixed with marijuana and/or prescription drugs. The mixture of alcohol and prescription drugs can be lethal all by itself, no auto accident needed. I don't think you could say the same thing about mixing alcohol and marijuana.



"He (GOD) makes grass grow for the cattle, and plants for people to cultivate—bringing forth food from the earth:
wine that gladdens human hearts, oil to make their faces shine, and bread that sustains their hearts." Psalm 104:14-15



Edited by Luthersfaith, 04 April 2012 - 02:35 PM.

"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

#128 Nospringsaussie

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:28 PM

Perhaps a basic and/or stupid question: have people found relief of their PD symptoms by using med maj. if yes which ones and how have you used it (smoked, ingested, pills). What sort of side effects? What frequency of use? Etc I.e advice in general

I have significant pain issues from my pd. I hate opiates but need to use a 50mcg fentynal patch + OxyContin for break through. Because maj is not legal I have no way to find information about how to use in relation to my pd. any advice of where to look. I am less interested in the debate about legality as I don't have enough knowledge about the benefits. I believe all drugs should be evaluated based on their fit for purpose relative to the symptoms they are supposed to control. No different to FDA approved meds.

#129 lethe

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 04:01 AM

G’Day Nospringsaussie and welcome to the group. I’ve had PD (physical symptoms) for about 12 years - I’m 56. Up until 4 years ago my physical symptoms were minor and not easily noticed. Slight tremor on my right side, leg and arm. Loss of some dexterity in right hand. Lethargy and anxiety. Four years ago I had a very bad physical and psychotic reaction from Mirapex or another med and ended up in Intensive Care for 3 days, and a second time in the hospital. For three or four months I had very limited mobility, no use of right hand, wore a cathater, etc . Although I’ve made good recovery I have a wide variety of new symptoms.

Please read this thread from the start and view the films as they will explain much. MM (medical marijuana) works both on the general health system and specific symptoms. Lets start with the basics - eat and sleep. The basis of good health.

Appetite stimulant. - The first thing MM became known for (during AIDS epidemic) and is well recognized now is it’s ability to give sick people an appetite, helping to gain weight in wasting diseases. Without it I have no appetite.

Sleep - Since my bad med reaction I am lucky to sleep 3 or 4 hours a night. The right indica strains of MM greatly help sleep, sometimes longer, but always deeper. If I’m without MM for a long time, at least every month or two I will have insomnia and not sleep a wink for 3 or 4 days.

Relaxes bladder - After my bad med reaction I was urinating every 2 hours or less. MM helps relax the bladder. In fact, now I can wake up without needing to necessarily go to the washroom and go back to sleep.

Eases tremors - it takes about a month or two of daily use to lessen tremors. Without MM I shake all the time when awake. With MM I get frequent periods of no shaking or little shaking. I had read that Drs doing research in Czek noticed this.

(something I posted recently-begin)
Pain relief, Dystonia and MM

The last few weeks have been especially difficult as I’ve been dealing with the pain from a kink in my neck and don’t sleep more than 1 or 2 hours at a time. I got a stiff neck from falling asleep improperly about 3 months ago but it started loosening up a few weeks ago, but as layer upon layer loosens I get pain, and a few times this week had difficulty and great pain getting out of bed and moving around, but I’m feeling better now and hope the worst is over.

On the positive side I made 2 discoveries: The first discovery is a MM strain that really works on pain, rather than masking it. Normally I don’t have that many pain issues (except for dystonia) but have found that most MM helps lessen pain indirectly- usually by lessening the focus on the pain. Recently on my MM club forum some people were saying how effective the latest batch of M-39 is. Normally I mix M-39 with other strains. Remembering this and being in exceptional pain I decided to vaporize it alone. Within 10 minutes all pain was gone, not a hint and it lasted for about 3 hours. It is called M-39 because of it’s exceptionally quick maturing - 39 days!

The 2nd discovery was that MM (most strains) helps alleviate dystonia. I take my last levadopa at 6 pm and don’t start again until 6 am. Anytime after 10 or 11 pm my foot may start cramping and it gets progressively worse. Normally I don’t sleep more than 3 or 4 hours a night, and so I really try not to go to sleep until 1 or 2 am so that I can sleep until close to 6am, minimizing dystonia. Up until the last month when I would get up at 4 or 5 am I would wait until 6am to vaporize MM, having it with my coffee and meds, but this month my sleep was disturbed so much and also the pain that I would medicate with MM when I got up, anytime between 1am - 5am..

Dystonia (levadopa responsive) causes my left foot to cramp so that I have to walk either on my toes or my heels and it gets worse until I take my pills. What I found was that within 10 minutes of vaping MM my foot would relax and I could walk normally. This lasted a few hours and the only thing that would start the dystonia again was if I started thinking stressful thoughts, but if I made a point of relaxing the dystonia would go away again. MM relaxes the cramp. It was only after realizing this that I came across this Wikipedia reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dystonia

Medication

“Different medications are tried in an effort to find a combination that is effective for a specific person. Not all people will respond well to the same medications. Medications that have had positive results in some include: diphenhydramine, benzatropine, anti-Parkinsons agents ( such as trihexyphenidyl), and muscle relaxers (such as diazepam).

Cannabidiol, one of the non-psychoactive cannabinoids found in cannabis sativa, was shown in a 6-week study to have reduced dystonic symptoms in all participants by up to 20-50%.[14][15]” (End)

Psychological: anxiety, lethargy, depression.
MM is a great relaxer, easing or eliminating anxiety. It helps with positive thoughts and a slight uplifting feeling. It also helps motivate and psychological energize.

I use a vaporize every 4 to 7 hours. I use different strains depending on need and time of day.

I will add to this when I remember something. Feel free to ask questions....

#130 Nospringsaussie

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:48 PM

G’Day Nospringsaussie and welcome to the group. I’ve had PD (physical symptoms) for about 12 years - I’m 56. Up until 4 years ago my physical symptoms were minor and not easily noticed. Slight tremor on my right side, leg and arm. Loss of some dexterity in right hand. Lethargy and anxiety. Four years ago I had a very bad physical and psychotic reaction from Mirapex or another med and ended up in Intensive Care for 3 days, and a second time in the hospital. For three or four months I had very limited mobility, no use of right hand, wore a cathater, etc . Although I’ve made good recovery I have a wide variety of new symptoms.

Please read this thread from the start and view the films as they will explain much. MM (medical marijuana) works both on the general health system and specific symptoms. Lets start with the basics - eat and sleep. The basis of good health.

Appetite stimulant. - The first thing MM became known for (during AIDS epidemic) and is well recognized now is it’s ability to give sick people an appetite, helping to gain weight in wasting diseases. Without it I have no appetite.

Sleep - Since my bad med reaction I am lucky to sleep 3 or 4 hours a night. The right indica strains of MM greatly help sleep, sometimes longer, but always deeper. If I’m without MM for a long time, at least every month or two I will have insomnia and not sleep a wink for 3 or 4 days.

Relaxes bladder - After my bad med reaction I was urinating every 2 hours or less. MM helps relax the bladder. In fact, now I can wake up without needing to necessarily go to the washroom and go back to
Eases tremors - it takes about a month or two of daily use to lessen tremors. Without MM I shake all the time when awake. With MM I get frequent periods of no shaking or little shaking. I had read that Drs doing research in Czek noticed this.

(something I posted recently-begin)
Pain relief, Dystonia and MM

The last few weeks have been especially difficult as I’ve been dealing with the pain from a kink in my neck and don’t sleep more than 1 or 2 hours at a time. I got a stiff neck from falling asleep improperly about 3 months ago but it started loosening up a few weeks ago, but as layer upon layer loosens I get pain, and a few times this week had difficulty and great pain getting out of bed and moving around, but I’m feeling better now and hope the worst is over.

On the positive side I made 2 discoveries: The first discovery is a MM strain that really works on pain, rather than masking it. Normally I don’t have that many pain issues (except for dystonia) but have found that most MM helps lessen pain indirectly- usually by lessening the focus on the pain. Recently on my MM club forum some people were saying how effective the latest batch of M-39 is. Normally I mix M-39 with other strains. Remembering this and being in exceptional pain I decided to vaporize it alone. Within 10 minutes all pain was gone, not a hint and it lasted for about 3 hours. It is called M-39 because of it’s exceptionally quick maturing - 39 days!

The 2nd discovery was that MM (most strains) helps alleviate dystonia. I take my last levadopa at 6 pm and don’t start again until 6 am. Anytime after 10 or 11 pm my foot may start cramping and it gets progressively worse. Normally I don’t sleep more than 3 or 4 hours a night, and so I really try not to go to sleep until 1 or 2 am so that I can sleep until close to 6am, minimizing dystonia. Up until the last month when I would get up at 4 or 5 am I would wait until 6am to vaporize MM, having it with my coffee and meds, but this month my sleep was disturbed so much and also the pain that I would medicate with MM when I got up, anytime between 1am - 5am..

Dystonia (levadopa responsive) causes my left foot to cramp so that I have to walk either on my toes or my heels and it gets worse until I take my pills. What I found was that within 10 minutes of vaping MM my foot would relax and I could walk normally. This lasted a few hours and the only thing that would start the dystonia again was if I started thinking stressful thoughts, but if I made a point of relaxing the dystonia would go away again. MM relaxes the cramp. It was only after realizing this that I came across this Wikipedia reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dystonia

Medication

“Different medications are tried in an effort to find a combination that is effective for a specific person. Not all people will respond well to the same medications. Medications that have had positive results in some include: diphenhydramine, benzatropine, anti-Parkinsons agents ( such as trihexyphenidyl), and muscle relaxers (such as diazepam).

Cannabidiol, one of the non-psychoactive cannabinoids found in cannabis sativa, was shown in a 6-week study to have reduced dystonic symptoms in all participants by up to 20-50%.[14][15]” (End)

Psychological: anxiety, lethargy, depression.
MM is a great relaxer, easing or eliminating anxiety. It helps with positive thoughts and a slight uplifting feeling. It also helps motivate and psychological energize.

I use a vaporize every 4 to 7 hours. I use different strains depending on need and time of day.

I will add to this when I remember something. Feel free to ask questions....


Firstly thanks for the background and comprehensive reply. I am glad for you that you have had relief from so many symptoms. It is clearly a complex topic. A couple of follow up points:
1. Regarding the efficacy of mm as a treatment option: I looked at a few of the you tube posts and it appears that the medical focus appears to be on a few specific areas of neurological outcomes. At least where I could stretch my little Aussie brain around the breadth of discussion.
2. IMHO there is also significant confusion around this topic. Based on my experience i tend to be cautious of "cure all" outcomes - I have been disappointed in the past when trying to get the same outcomes for myself. Perhaps I missed this part of the discussion but I could not find any background on Pharmacieutical companies driving/lobbying from this traditionally lobby ready industry to move the govn on this issue. Let's not forget that the FDA is not without bias and is subject to influence. I also don't get why my money grubbing friends in the pharma industry aren't all over mm if it has such broad appeal and offers such a range symptom relief.

In my own experience suffering with PD for the past 4 years is that maj was somewhat helpful when I could no longer stand the pain and needed to separate my brain from my body it was a helpful alternative to opioids. I struggled however, with the blunting side effects. If it is to be legalized, again IMHO there needs to be some help from big pharma to get the recipe right.

Lethe your knowledge of the strains, usage and efficacy paths in general is amazing and helpful; big pharma could leverage your insight.

#131 lethe

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:59 AM

http://www.thestar.c...ze-cocaine?bn=1

Why Latin America is looking at legalizing cocaine
By Oakland Ross

What does celebrated Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa have in common with the president of Guatemala and the editors of The Economist magazine, not to mention a century-old U.S. toothache remedy?

Simple: legal cocaine.

The Peruvian is for it, as is Guatemalan leader Otto Perez, as well as a growing assembly of influential Latin Americans.

I think it is important for us to have other alternatives. ... ” Perez told CNN en Español earlier this year. “We have to talk about decriminalization of the production, the transit and, of course, the consumption.”

As for The Economist, the venerable British publication has long advocated removing criminal sanctions from cocaine, arguing this is the only way to reduce the otherwise relentless toll of death, corruption and social disintegration the drug has engendered on account of being illegal.

On April 14 and 15, heads of state and government from across the Americas, including U.S. President Barack Obama, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and their Latin American and Caribbean counterparts, will gather for a two-day summit in Cartagena, Colombia, and the so-called war on drugs will figure near the top of their agenda — for one overriding reason.

It isn’t working.

In Mexico alone, more than 50,000 people have perished in a violent campaign against narcotics that began five years ago, when President Felipe Calderón threw down the gauntlet in a do-or-die battle against Mexico’s mighty drug cartels.

Since then, some parts of Mexican territory have degenerated into lawless, quasi-feudal regions where criminals exert as much influence as the state. Basic human rights protections have been weakened or abandoned altogether. Law-abiding folk have fled or now dwell in fear. Thousands of people have simply disappeared. And the cocaine trade? It marches on, as insidious and profitable as ever.

In the makeshift republics of Central America, the situation is even worse, while Colombia, Peru and Bolivia — the main cocaine-producing nations — are also obliged to suffer the corrosive effects of the narcotics trade.

“Organized crime is our reality,” says José Gil Olmos, a reporter for the Mexican newsmagazine Proceso. “It’s a Medusa.”

All this, thanks to a leafy and otherwise harmless shrub endemic to South America, called coca, from which cocaine is refined.

Oh, and that toothache remedy?

Roughly a century ago, the Lloyd Manufacturing Co. in the United States produced a treatment for oral complaints that promised an “instantaneous cure,” sold for just 15 cents a package, and whose principal ingredient was none other than cocaine.

Many such products were available back then, for the simple reason that cocaine used to be legal in the United States and Canada, as were opium and marijuana. The makers of Bayer pharmaceutical products marketed a cough remedy derived from heroin.

Coca-Cola owed its trademark kick to the presence of a discreet dash of cocaine in each and every bottle.

Somehow, civilized society managed to survive these substances, when they were legal.

Now they are illegal — and witness the result.

The international trade in narcotics has become a massive criminal enterprise that corrupts police forces, cripples judicial systems and undermines the integrity of entire states, against a backdrop of ruthless violence.

“For the first time, there is widespread recognition that present policies have failed and there need to be new alternatives,” says Coletta Youngers, a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America, a privately funded think-tank. “Latin American countries have basically forced the U.S. into agreeing to discuss other alternatives, including legalization.”

Nobody expects the Barack Obama administration to turn its back on a century-old U.S. regimen of strict narcotics prohibition — or certainly not soon, and especially not in an election year — but Latin Americans have spent decades paying for that regimen with cash, criminality and blood, and they have just about run out of patience.

“The administration is well aware that the debate on drug legalization is roaring like an express train,” says Larry Birns, director of the Washington-based Council on Hemispheric Affairs. “It’s not going to be easily stopped.”

For its part, Canada seems to be no more forward-looking on the narcotics file than is Washington.

“The Canadian approach is simple,” says Marcel Martel, a history professor at York University and an expert on organized crime. “It’s repression. Stephen Harper hasn’t indicated he plans to revisit the way Canada handles illegal drug use.”

But leaders in many Latin American capitals have been forced by circumstance to do precisely that, or else watch their countries degenerate into narco-republics, governed by fear, payola and hit men, a slide already well under way in some cases.

Desperate for solutions, many Latin Americans now favour legalizing cocaine and other drugs, including heroin, ecstasy and marijuana. That, they argue, would put the drug traffickers out of business.

But would it? Even assuming such a measure were politically feasible — a huge assumption in the case of the United States and Canada — would legalizing narcotics somehow solve a problem that has so far resisted all other strategies?

Many experts insist it would not, or not on its own.

“Those who favour legalization say, if you legalize, then the criminals will be bankrupt,” says Vanda Felbab-Brown, a U.S. expert on the global drug trade and author of Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs. “That’s a hugely optimistic outlook.”

For one thing, the feuding drug cartels would not simply ride off into a peaceful retirement if their main sources of revenue were to be stripped from the criminal code.

“Drugs are not the only illegal activity in Mexico,” says Carlos Adolfo Gutiérrez Vidal, director of the school of communications at the University of the Cloister of Sister Juana in Mexico City.

Even now, the narcotraficantes supplement their earnings from drugs with other revenue streams, including human trafficking, kidnapping, extortion, auto theft and contract killing, among others. Legalizing narcotics would not reduce those activities.

In fact, says Felbab-Brown, the measure might well cause increased violence, because criminal organizations would need to compete that much harder for control of their remaining businesses or to develop new sources of income.

Some experts are promoting a third course that would more or less tolerate drug trafficking without making it legal, a compromise similar to the so-called Pax Mafiosa that prevails in parts of Italy.

Under such an arrangement, the drug trade would remain formally illegal but would face little government interference, as long as the cartels dramatically reduced present levels of violence.

“I think people would prefer this,” says Gil Olmos at Proceso.

Felbab-Brown thinks otherwise.

That sort of accommodation, she says, is effectively the system that prevailed in Mexico from the 1940s until the 1980s, a time when the country was ruled by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which operated in those days as a sort of corporate dictatorship headed by an all-powerful presidency.

She believes the arrangement worked then because the criminal ringleaders genuinely feared the PRI. But times have changed, and Felbab-Brown doubts the old entente between Mexico’s politicians and its drug lords can or should be restored.

“I do not believe a deal is achievable or even wise. It was precisely this deal that compromised the police and the judicial system in Mexico.”

The situation is even more parlous in Central America, where small states with frail institutions are largely helpless before the drug lords, whose activities they barely try to curtail.

Instead, corrupt and incompetent police forces spend their days and nights rounding up shiftless youths on minor or trumped-up charges and cramming them into overcrowded prisons, merely worsening an already grim state of affairs.

“Those prisons are universities for delinquents,” says Javier Martinez, outgoing mayor of the Salvadoran town of Suchitoto. “These are not criminals. They don’t represent a threat to society.”

Not now, maybe. But chances are they will.

Clearly, such measures are not working.

Martel at York University says they have never worked. In one form or another, the war on drugs has been waged for more than a century, he says, ever since the early 1900s, when U.S. and Canadian authorities succumbed to pressure from radical Christian groups and declared opium illegal.

Cocaine was banned a few years later and marijuana in the 1920s.

All these embargoes sprang in part from a racist motivation, says Martel, because the drugs were depicted as an external menace, foisted upon God-fearing white North Americans by Chinese or Hispanic “aliens.”

Alcohol was prohibited, too. But that ban was suspended in 1933 and for a simple reason — it didn’t work.

The sanctions against narcotics have been no more effective, yet they have remained in place.

“The U.S. and Canada have enrolled the rest of the world in their crusade against drugs,” says Martel.

At least some Latin American governments have concluded that the crusade has gone on long enough. It’s time to try something else.

But, if criminal penalties have failed, if legalization is not the answer, and if a Pax Mafiosa won’t work either, then what is left?

According to Felbab-Brown, there is no quick fix but only a sustained and tortuous exercise in state-building — the gradual creation of effective police forces, judicial systems and other institutions in countries where those agencies are now so deeply emaciated by fear and graft that they barely function.

“This will be an enormous project for Mexico and an order of magnitude greater for Central America,” she says. “We really need to think of organized crime as a competition in state-making.”

Unfortunately, it’s the drug lords who enjoy the preponderance of money, guns and savagery. They won’t go down soon or without a fight — if they go down at all.

“The Latin American drug story is not going to have a happy ending,” predicts a sorrowful Birns at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs. “There is no way out.”

Here’s hoping he’s wrong. But what if he’s right?

#132 lethe

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 08:59 AM

https://1anonymousle...opcannabis-420/

#133 lethe

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:11 AM

Firstly thanks for the background and comprehensive reply. I am glad for you that you have had relief from so many symptoms. It is clearly a complex topic. A couple of follow up points:
1. Regarding the efficacy of mm as a treatment option: I looked at a few of the you tube posts and it appears that the medical focus appears to be on a few specific areas of neurological outcomes. At least where I could stretch my little Aussie brain around the breadth of discussion.
2. IMHO there is also significant confusion around this topic. Based on my experience i tend to be cautious of "cure all" outcomes - I have been disappointed in the past when trying to get the same outcomes for myself. Perhaps I missed this part of the discussion but I could not find any background on Pharmacieutical companies driving/lobbying from this traditionally lobby ready industry to move the govn on this issue. Let's not forget that the FDA is not without bias and is subject to influence. I also don't get why my money grubbing friends in the pharma industry aren't all over mm if it has such broad appeal and offers such a range symptom relief.

In my own experience suffering with PD for the past 4 years is that maj was somewhat helpful when I could no longer stand the pain and needed to separate my brain from my body it was a helpful alternative to opioids. I struggled however, with the blunting side effects. If it is to be legalized, again IMHO there needs to be some help from big pharma to get the recipe right.

Lethe your knowledge of the strains, usage and efficacy paths in general is amazing and helpful; big pharma could leverage your insight.


Big Pharma wants nothing to do with MM because there's no real money in it, plain and simple....
It costs next to nothing to grow and anyone can do it. Also, as MM can replace many pharmaceuticals it threatens their profits.

Which side effects are you referring too?

Edited by lethe, 11 April 2012 - 09:12 AM.


#134 lethe

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:37 PM

http://tinyurl.com/cs4cvvx

Marijuana relieves muscles tightness, pain of multiple sclerosis: Study
Paul Irish Life Reporter

Smoking marijuana can relieve muscle tightness, spasticity (contractions) and pain often experienced by those with multiple sclerosis, says research out of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
The findings, just published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, included a controlled trial with 30 participants to understand whether inhaled cannabis would help complicated cases where existing pharmaceuticals are ineffective or trigger adverse side effects.
MS is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain and spinal cord.
The disease attacks the myelin, the protective covering wrapped around the nerves of the central nervous system, and — among other symptoms — can cause loss of balance, impaired speech, extreme fatigue, double vision and paralysis.
The average age of the research participants was 50 years with 63 per cent of the study population female.
More than half the participants needed walking aids and 20 per cent used wheelchairs.
Rather than rely on self-reporting by patients regarding their muscle spasticity — a subjective measure — health professionals rated each patient’s joints on the modified Ashworth scale, a common objective tool to evaluate intensity of muscle tone.
The researchers found that the individuals in the group that smoked cannabis experienced an almost one-third decrease on the Ashworth scale — 2.74 points from a baseline score of 9.3 — meaning spasticity improved, compared to the placebo group.
As well, pain scores decreased by about 50 per cent.
“We saw a beneficial effect of smoked cannabis on treatment-resistant spasticity and pain associated with multiple sclerosis among our participants,” says Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom of the university’s department of neuroscience.
Researchers found that, although generally well-tolerated, the cannabis had the expected short-term but acute cognitive effects.
Corey-Bloom says larger, long-term studies are needed to confirm findings and determine whether lower doses can result in beneficial effects with less cognitive impact.
The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada says Canadians have one of the highest rates of the disease in the world. The disease is the most common neurological diseases affecting young adults in this country and every day three more people in Canada are diagnosed with MS.

#135 scottwh

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:09 AM

this isnt law enforcement forum
how many of you have tried and have been helped by pot
and what did your neurologist say
it realy works for me but im nervous to use it since I take other drugs and
obviously have a hurt brain already

#136 lethe

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 09:41 AM



#137 lethe

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 09:52 AM



#138 lethe

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 05:52 AM



#139 lethe

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 09:37 AM

http://www.nytimes.c...juana.html?_r=2

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Op-Ed Contributor

A Judge’s Plea for Pot

By GUSTIN L. REICHBACH

Published: May 16, 2012


THREE and a half years ago, on my 62nd birthday, doctors discovered a mass on my pancreas. It turned out to be Stage 3 pancreatic cancer. I was told I would be dead in four to six months. Today I am in that rare coterie of people who have survived this long with the disease. But I did not foresee that after having dedicated myself for 40 years to a life of the law, including more than two decades as a New York State judge, my quest for ameliorative and palliative care would lead me to marijuana.

My survival has demanded an enormous price, including months of chemotherapy, radiation hell and brutal surgery. For about a year, my cancer disappeared, only to return. About a month ago, I started a new and even more debilitating course of treatment. Every other week, after receiving an IV booster of chemotherapy drugs that takes three hours, I wear a pump that slowly injects more of the drugs over the next 48 hours.

Nausea and pain are constant companions. One struggles to eat enough to stave off the dramatic weight loss that is part of this disease. Eating, one of the great pleasures of life, has now become a daily battle, with each forkful a small victory. Every drug prescribed to treat one problem leads to one or two more drugs to offset its side effects. Pain medication leads to loss of appetite and constipation. Anti-nausea medication raises glucose levels, a serious problem for me with my pancreas so compromised. Sleep, which might bring respite from the miseries of the day, becomes increasingly elusive.

Inhaled marijuana is the only medicine that gives me some relief from nausea, stimulates my appetite, and makes it easier to fall asleep. The oral synthetic substitute, Marinol, prescribed by my doctors, was useless. Rather than watch the agony of my suffering, friends have chosen, at some personal risk, to provide the substance. I find a few puffs of marijuana before dinner gives me ammunition in the battle to eat. A few more puffs at bedtime permits desperately needed sleep.

This is not a law-and-order issue; it is a medical and a human rights issue. Being treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, I am receiving the absolute gold standard of medical care. But doctors cannot be expected to do what the law prohibits, even when they know it is in the best interests of their patients. When palliative care is understood as a fundamental human and medical right, marijuana for medical use should be beyond controversy.

Sixteen states already permit the legitimate clinical use of marijuana, including our neighbor New Jersey, and Connecticut is on the cusp of becoming No. 17. The New York State Legislature is now debating a bill to recognize marijuana as an effective and legitimate medicinal substance and establish a lawful framework for its use. The Assembly has passed such bills before, but they went nowhere in the State Senate. This year I hope that the outcome will be different. Cancer is a nonpartisan disease, so ubiquitous that it’s impossible to imagine that there are legislators whose families have not also been touched by this scourge. It is to help all who have been affected by cancer, and those who will come after, that I now speak.

Given my position as a sitting judge still hearing cases, well-meaning friends question the wisdom of my coming out on this issue. But I recognize that fellow cancer sufferers may be unable, for a host of reasons, to give voice to our plight. It is another heartbreaking aporia in the world of cancer that the one drug that gives relief without deleterious side effects remains classified as a narcotic with no medicinal value.

Because criminalizing an effective medical technique affects the fair administration of justice, I feel obliged to speak out as both a judge and a cancer patient suffering with a fatal disease. I implore the governor and the Legislature of New York, always considered a leader among states, to join the forward and humane thinking of 16 other states and pass the medical marijuana bill this year. Medical science has not yet found a cure, but it is barbaric to deny us access to one substance that has proved to ameliorate our suffering.


Gustin L. Reichbach is a justice of the State Supreme Court in Brooklyn.

#140 scottwh

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 10:45 AM

medical marajawana has become yet another wedge issue for partisan gain,
we need to elect moderate politicians who aim for finding the common ground of simply doing what good can be accomplished
and fostering good will to get momentum to do more
after all what sane person wouldent be convinced be previous post, its got to be about something else
scott




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