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Screaming during sleep


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#1 Ljubica Lojan

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 04:33 PM

My husband, 12 year PD patient, 75 years old, is sometimes screaming and yelling during his sleep. Is this dangerous? My husband thinks that I should wake him up during such episodes. Should I? Thank you.
Emily

#2 Dr. Okun

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 04:48 PM

This is usually a common sleeping problem in PD called REM sleep behavior disorder. When severe as you describe you can injure yourself or your bed partner. The treatment is usually something simple like a sleep study and a drug called clonazepam.
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips

#3 Silverfoxx

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 06:03 PM

Hi Emily, My name is Jim and I have had PD for 35-1/2 years. Dr. Okun's answer is perffect. I would like to give you the PWP perspective: In my "history" of PD, REMSBD is probably one of the most damaging symptoms of PD. Damaging in thst husband/wife relationships have been, sometimes, permanently destoyed just from the appearance of this symptom alone. Then, there is the very likely possibility of physical danger to the spouse. This usually occurs when the PWP begins to "act out" his/her nightmares that occur during the REM cycle of sleep. The PD patient, in most cases, is completely unaware of what is going on. Even though, at times, it appears that he/she may be awake, which segways into a partial answer to your question, "Should I wake him?" That question has probably been asked for all time. There is conjecture with any answer, whether positive or negative. In my case it probably would have had far worse consequences had my wife tried to awaken me! My REMSBD got so bad that at times my wife would be bruised in the morning. Because of that, I chose to sleep in another bedroom to protect my wife from harm caused by my thrashing about, both arms and legs. It got so bad for me that, accordding to my wife, I would stand on the bed and actually dive off onto the floor, crashing into the wall, breaking bedroom furniture and lamps on my way down. Luckily, I never broke any bones, in my wife or myself. In any event, I and my wife reported all of this to our PCP. He referred me to a doctor whi does slepp studies and analysts. I had my sleep study done. The video was quite shocking to me! Not only was I able to hear what I was saying, but what really alarmed me was the violent way I thrashed my arms and fists, and the violent kicking about of my feet and legs, as if trying to kick, and harm, someone or something that appeared was trying to harm me!. All unaware to me until I viewed the video! I was soon Rx'd Clonazepam on an upward titration schedule. I began taking .5MG for one week, then began taking 1MG. Which is where I am today Five years later. Clonazepam, which is the generic of Klonipin, has worked well for me. In my case, not only is the REMSBD under control, but I sleep ALL night, which is a problem for most PWP, and I am well rested in the morning when I wake up! My wife sometimes tells me that I mumble at times, but not frequently, and never louder than a whisper. In other words, not like before I began taking Clonazepam.

If I were you and your husband, I would take Dr. Okun's advice and mention Clonazepam to your Doctor! The sooner, the better!

Your ffriend in PD, Jim Evridge "AKA:SILVERFOXX_FIGHTING_BACK"
"Sometimes our light goes out but is blown into a flame by another human being. Each of us owes our deepest thanks to those who have rekindled this light." Albert Schweitzer

#4 Ljubica Lojan

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 07:38 PM

My husband, 12 year PD patient, 75 years old, is sometimes screaming and yelling during his sleep. Is this dangerous? My husband thinks that I should wake him up during such episodes. Should I? Thank you.
Emily

Thank you for your reply. My husband sleeps alone. Now we wonder if such screeming episodes need to be monitored. We would not like to add more drugs. He thinks I should wake him up when he screams. Thank you.
Emily

#5 Dr. Okun

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:11 PM

Thank you for the thoughtful responses.

In most cases we do use a simple medication at bedtime and it makes a big difference,
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips

#6 Gardener

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 04:32 AM

Thank you for the thoughtful responses.

In most cases we do use a simple medication at bedtime and it makes a big difference,


Gardener, female, 58, diagnosed at 55, 650 mg of Sinemet daily.


#7 Gardener

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 04:39 AM

Thank you for the thoughtful responses.

In most cases we do use a simple medication at bedtime and it makes a big difference,


For over a decade, my husband, 68, has been exhibiting the same sleeping habits described in the previous post. We have not been able to sleep together for the last six years. Also during that same time, he has become very stiff. He has a lot of twitching but no typical pd tremor. I was recently diagnosed with pd at age 56. He refuses to talk to a doctor about these symptoms. Does he likely have it also?

Gardener, female, 58, diagnosed at 55, 650 mg of Sinemet daily.


#8 Dr. Okun

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 06:24 AM

It is hard to know without an examination, but it would certainly sound like based on your history it would be worth a trip to the doc.
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips




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