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Gender specific dopamine levels?


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#1 Beau's Mom

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 01:08 AM

Hello, Dr. Okun,

I caught a line from a non-PD related video I watched tonight: "Men have higher levels of dopamine than women."

Is this true? It also caused me to question exactly what dopamine affects besides muscle movement. Is that, too, different in men than in women? Do mean and women experience PD differently in any significant way, like they do the signs of a heart attack? Why are there more men afflicted with PD than women? My curiosity is aroused!

As always, many thanks for your input!

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

 

First symptoms: right-hand tremor, constipation and restless arms 1978 (age 25). Depression and anxiety (non-motor symptoms) began in 1989 and worsened through the years. Last inpatient episode June 2013.

Diagnosed December, 2010 by a regular neurologist (age 57). After negative reactions to Requip, Mirapex and selegiline began Sinemet 25/100 3x/day. First MDS visit in Houston in February of 2011 was inconclusive. Second MDS visit at Baylor Fort Worth in May/June 2011 diagnosis changed to Parkinsonism, Sinemet stopped. Third MDS visit in August 2011 in WA State: received a confirmed diagnosis of idiopathic PD which had started on the right side and had now crossed to the left side as well. Restarted on Sinemet 25/100 4x/day. A short trial of Amantadine caused audio hallucinations in September 2011.

 

Current medications at age 62: Sinemet 25/100 ODT every 2.5 hours while awake (7/day). One Sinemet 25/100 CR between midnight and 4 AM. Trazodone 200 mg at bedtime, Fluvoxamine 300 mg at bedtime. Clonazepam 0.5 mg morning and afternoon, 1 mg at bedtime. Vit D3 2x/day, Calcium Carbonate Susp. 5 cc daily, Baclofen 10 mg 3x/day, Flonase two sprays 2x/day, Calcitonin-Salmon nasal spray once daily (for osteoporosis). Gel eye drops as needed throughout the day, Restasis Eye drops 2x/day, Nighttime eye ointment at bedtime. 02 2L per nasal cannula while asleep. Walker, electric wheelchair, moist and soft or pureed foods and 115 caregiver hours/month keep me sane.

 

All of the above subject to change based on progression, stress level, and dyskinesia. Whew! I'm glad I finally wrote that all out.


#2 Dr. Okun

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 06:48 AM

The gender specifics in PD are interesting. No one knows why men get it more frequently. Also levels of many hormones can be different. Finally there are many papers showing differences in PD symptoms between men and women. A further understanding could be critical to the development of future treatments. Here is an abstract you might enjoy.


Maturitas. 2010 Apr;65(4):352-8. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2010.01.001. Epub 2010 Feb 1.


Parkinson's disease in women: a call for improved clinical studies and for comparative effectiveness research.

Pavon JM, Whitson HE, Okun MS.



Source

Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. juliessa.pavon@duke.edu



Abstract


The incidence and prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to rise precipitously over the next several decades, as will the associated healthcare related costs. The epidemiology and disease manifestations of PD may differ when comparing women to men. Women are for example less likely to acquire PD, and in several studies have demonstrated a delayed onset of motor symptoms. Women, however, are more likely to experience PD-related complications that may lead to disability (e.g. depression and medication-associated dyskinesia). Further, there are purporteddifferences in the treatment and treatment outcomes in PD men compared to women. Whether estrogen, other hormonal activity, or whether multiple factors underpin these findings remains unknown. Also unknown is whether estrogen itself may represent a therapeutic option for symptomatic PD treatment. This review summarizes what is known about gender differences in epidemiology, clinical features, treatment outcomes (medical and surgical/deep brain stimulation), and social impact among all available PD studies. We offer expert opinion regarding the shortcomings of the current evidence, and we propose a detailed list of studies that will help to clarify important gender related PD questions. Our hope is that this review will spark comparative effectiveness research into improving care and outcomes in women with PD.
Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.



PMID: 20117891 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] PMCID: PMC2875870 Fr


Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips

#3 Beau's Mom

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 10:32 PM

Do you know how we can get a copy of the study conclusions? Thanks.

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

 

First symptoms: right-hand tremor, constipation and restless arms 1978 (age 25). Depression and anxiety (non-motor symptoms) began in 1989 and worsened through the years. Last inpatient episode June 2013.

Diagnosed December, 2010 by a regular neurologist (age 57). After negative reactions to Requip, Mirapex and selegiline began Sinemet 25/100 3x/day. First MDS visit in Houston in February of 2011 was inconclusive. Second MDS visit at Baylor Fort Worth in May/June 2011 diagnosis changed to Parkinsonism, Sinemet stopped. Third MDS visit in August 2011 in WA State: received a confirmed diagnosis of idiopathic PD which had started on the right side and had now crossed to the left side as well. Restarted on Sinemet 25/100 4x/day. A short trial of Amantadine caused audio hallucinations in September 2011.

 

Current medications at age 62: Sinemet 25/100 ODT every 2.5 hours while awake (7/day). One Sinemet 25/100 CR between midnight and 4 AM. Trazodone 200 mg at bedtime, Fluvoxamine 300 mg at bedtime. Clonazepam 0.5 mg morning and afternoon, 1 mg at bedtime. Vit D3 2x/day, Calcium Carbonate Susp. 5 cc daily, Baclofen 10 mg 3x/day, Flonase two sprays 2x/day, Calcitonin-Salmon nasal spray once daily (for osteoporosis). Gel eye drops as needed throughout the day, Restasis Eye drops 2x/day, Nighttime eye ointment at bedtime. 02 2L per nasal cannula while asleep. Walker, electric wheelchair, moist and soft or pureed foods and 115 caregiver hours/month keep me sane.

 

All of the above subject to change based on progression, stress level, and dyskinesia. Whew! I'm glad I finally wrote that all out.


#4 Dr. Okun

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:47 AM

It is a review article, but you can write to Dr. Juliessa Pavon in the Department of Medicine at Duke.
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Author of the Amazon Bestseller Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: http://movementdisor...hael-s-okun-md/
or Visit Parkinson's Disease treatment and research blogs at:
NPF's What's Hot in Parkinson's disease
or his parkinsonsecrets.com blog for treatment tips




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