Jump to content


E-Newsletter Signup Like us on Facebook Sign Up For Our e-Newsletter
Photo

Mayo gets $7 million grant for Parkinson's study


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Kathrynne Holden, MS

Kathrynne Holden, MS

    Moderator

  • Ask the Dietician Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts
  • Locationfacebook.com/Parkinsons.Chew.On.This.

Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:21 PM

Mayo gets $7 million grant for Parkinson's study


The NIH grant will aid in the study of the disease for five years.

Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:44pm | Updated: February 12, 2013 - 1:15pm

J
View this story on the All-Access Members site



By Roger Bull

Mayo Clinic Jacksonville has received a five-year,
$7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue its study of the genetic causes of Parkinson’s disease.
As the genetic keys are found, those with a greater likelihood of developing the disease can take steps to reduce the chances, said Dennis Dickson, a neuropathologist and the center’s director.
The clinic’s Udall Center of Excellence in Parkinson’s Disease Research has received federal funding since 1999. But in recent years, that funding has dropped to about $500,000 a year, said Dennis Dickson, a neuropathologist and the center’s director.
Not only does this grant more than double the money the clinic has been receiving, it guarantees it for five years.
“With the tight funding, we’ve been limping along,” he said. “It puts a lot of pressure if you have to apply for a new grant every year.”
Although the Mayo Clinic does treat Parkinson’s patients, the primary purpose of the Udall Center, one of 10 such centers in the country, is research.
Dickson said that at one time, Parkinson’s was thought to be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to a toxin. But now research has found genetic causes. Mayo’s Udall Center itself has identified 10 genes connected to Parkinson’s disease or related neurodegenerative disorders.
He said there’s not a lot that doctors can do once a patient has a disease like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s because the brain cannot repair itself very well. So the emphasis is on prevention.
For example, while exercise is obviously beneficial to everyone, it’s even more vital to someone with a genetic tendency toward Parkinson’s since it’s shown to help prevent the onset of the disease.
Dickson said that about 25 employees at Mayo are connected in some way with the grant, though it only pays part of the individual salaries.
The increased funding, he said, will allow for more people to study more brain tissue to identify the genetic culprits.
roger.bull@jacksonville.com, (904) 359-4296

http://jacksonville....arkinsons-study
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

--

For a Parkinson Tip of the Day visit:

<!-- m -->http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/<!-- m -->

#2 miracleseeker

miracleseeker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 880 posts

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:41 PM

I hate to be negative but all this means is job security for some researchers for 5 years and nothing much else.

#3 Kathrynne Holden, MS

Kathrynne Holden, MS

    Moderator

  • Ask the Dietician Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts
  • Locationfacebook.com/Parkinsons.Chew.On.This.

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:27 PM

You may be right; but I will continue to hope. The Mayo Clinic has a good reputation for its work. I do have hope that better understanding of the genetic causes may help people in future to reduce the risk of developing PD. I think it's likely to be a long struggle, but then, that has also been the case for many other diseases.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

--

For a Parkinson Tip of the Day visit:

<!-- m -->http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/<!-- m -->

#4 miracleseeker

miracleseeker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 880 posts

Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:14 PM

Thers is no cure for anything. Not even a cold. What are these researches good for?

#5 Kathrynne Holden, MS

Kathrynne Holden, MS

    Moderator

  • Ask the Dietician Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts
  • Locationfacebook.com/Parkinsons.Chew.On.This.

Posted 18 February 2013 - 06:00 PM

This particular research appears to be focused on reducing risk for PD rather than seeking a cure. If, for example, one knows that one has a gene for breast cancer, there are many known factors that increase that risk (smoking, alcohol, certain fats), and many known factors that reduce the risk (fiber, folate, vitamin C, carotenoids). By avoiding factors that increase cancer risk, and focusing on factors that decrease the risk, it's conceivable that many, perhaps most, high-risk women could avoid breast cancer. I hope this might be so for people at risk for PD.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

--

For a Parkinson Tip of the Day visit:

<!-- m -->http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/<!-- m -->

#6 miracleseeker

miracleseeker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 880 posts

Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:22 PM

Unfortunately there is no sure thing in life. My cousin died of 4th stage lung cancer and he never smoked or drank his whole life. He did all the right things and lived a good healthy lifestyle but it still got him. In the end it was the chemo that did him in.
He suffered greatly for the 13 months he hung on.

#7 Kathrynne Holden, MS

Kathrynne Holden, MS

    Moderator

  • Ask the Dietician Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts
  • Locationfacebook.com/Parkinsons.Chew.On.This.

Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:27 PM

No, nothing in life is certain, you are right about that. We can do our best to reduce risk, but we cannot guarantee that our efforts will be effective.

On another note, I'm hoping your mother is doing better and that she will be able to have dental implants; or if that's not possible, that she can still enjoy her food. She is most fortunate to have a daughter so loving and caring, and I am certain that it gives quality to her life.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

--

For a Parkinson Tip of the Day visit:

<!-- m -->http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/<!-- m -->

#8 miracleseeker

miracleseeker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 880 posts

Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:14 AM

Thank you for the complement. I do it cause I love my mom and not because I feel obligated. We are almost in March and nothing has happened. I'm hitting one road block after another. I feed her tons of noodles and pasta dishes and she's always starving for more. It is next to impossible to brush her teeth because she bites it when I put it in her mouth. I usually make sure she rinses out her mouth and I use toothpicks and floss to get the gunk out.

A few weeks ago she sprained her wrist pretty bad. It was swollen and bruised and she was in pain but 2 days later she stopped cringing when I would touch the area. Today someone mentioned that it looked dislocated and I should take her to get it looked at. I cannot get off work so I'm just going to wait and see. it's always something. I now need to get a power of attorney for her so I would be able to get future procedures done on her behalf. The HIPA rule is maddening. This will further delay her treatment. I really hate beuracracy.

#9 Kathrynne Holden, MS

Kathrynne Holden, MS

    Moderator

  • Ask the Dietician Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts
  • Locationfacebook.com/Parkinsons.Chew.On.This.

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:56 PM

I had so hoped to hear that implants could be a possibility. You are very resourceful, in having her rinse her mouth and helping her floss, this will certainly help. Regarding her wrist, if she is not in pain, that is surely a good sign.

Definitely you should get a POA for her sake as well as your own. I believe her doctor can help by writing a letter stating the need; your local Office on Aging also may be able to help in this regard. I am thinking of you daily and hoping/praying for good results.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

--

For a Parkinson Tip of the Day visit:

<!-- m -->http://www.nutritionucanlivewith.com/<!-- m -->




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users