Jump to content


E-Newsletter Signup Like us on Facebook Sign Up For Our e-Newsletter
Photo

PD Treatment Implicated In Indecent Assault Accusation


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Beachdog

Beachdog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 816 posts
  • LocationCape Cod Massachusetts

Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:07 PM

http://boston.com/me...lBkJ/story.html

Milton High track coach accused of kissing 16-year-old girl changed after Parkinson’s treatment, defense attorney says

By Brian Ballou and John R. Ellement, Globe Staff
QUINCY – The Milton High School track coach accused of kissing a 16-year-old member of his track team is being treated for Parkinson’s disease, and that treatment has increased his libido and decreased his impulse control, his defense attorney said today.
Dale Snyder pleaded not guilty in Quincy District Court to one count of indecent assault and battery and two counts of assault and battery before Judge Mark Coven, who set bail for the 64-year-old Abington resident at $10,000 cash.
Defense attorney Thomas Lawton told Coven that a key issue in the case is how Snyder, a married man with a teenaged child, had changed since he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s about two years ago. Those changes have intensified while he receives a drug that Lawton identified as Stalevo.
Lawton told Coven that Snyder’s impulse control has been weakened since the diagnosis and the treatment began. At the same time, Snyder’s libido has increased, the attorney said.

Snyder, who is scheduled to retire June 24 after 27 years in the Milton public schools, is accused of indecently assaulting the unidentified girl on June 2 while in his office at Milton High School. The assault took place two days after Snyder and the girl had an uneventful meeting at his office, according to Norfolk Assistant District Attorney Adam C. Lally.
On June 2, Snyder was sitting at his desk when he reached out and took the student by the hand, Lally said. He first kissed her on the cheek, and then told her, “now for the big one.’’ At that point, he kissed the girl on the lips, Lally said.
The prosecutor said the teenager broke away from Snyder, told him she was uncomfortable, and that the long-time track coach told her not to discuss the incident.
Lally also said the kissing incident was just the latest chapter in what he called Snyder’s “special interest’’ in the high school student. He said that in recent weeks, Snyder gave the girl a leather bracelet and also followed behind her on his bike as she rode her bike to her home.
In an interaction witnessed by the victim’s mother, Snyder allegedly gave her his business card and told her to contact him so they could bike together.
Snyder is due back in court June 26 for a pre-trial conference

#2 Drummergirl

Drummergirl

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 379 posts
  • LocationWhite River Jct. Vermont

Posted 10 June 2013 - 08:10 PM

Hmm....not sure I believe it was just from the Stalevo....
Karen

Dx in 95' at 35- Normal MRI, Abnormal Da t Scan- Resting tremor- right foot, leg tremors. RX- 25/100 Carb/ l =600 mg,
0.5 Azilect 1 daily Comtan 200mg 2 day, 0.5 mg Clonazepam 1 daily.

#3 Beau's Mom

Beau's Mom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,657 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA

Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:45 PM

Ridiculous.
Dianne

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

#4 Rogerstar1

Rogerstar1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,776 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

Posted 11 June 2013 - 11:19 AM

Dianne - For purposes of discussion what, in your opinion, is 'ridiculous' about Beachdog's post, this thread or the PWP lawyer's contention?

Edited by Rogerstar1, 11 June 2013 - 11:20 AM.


#5 Beau's Mom

Beau's Mom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,657 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA

Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:54 PM

I may be mistaken, but I thought only agonists caused compulsive behaviors. I didn't think Stalevo was an agonist and had never heard of it or carb/levo causing the same kinds of behaviors. Please correct me if I am wrong.
Dianne

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

#6 sarahjo

sarahjo

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 212 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:43 PM

hey guys I am not understanding this all that well, we were raised to and have raised our children to be responsible for their actions, I am new to all this medication stuff, but if this is the case wouldn't it had been a one time offense. and if you start to think along these lines wouldn't you as an adult remove yourself from the situation, exp. never be alone with a young person, always have another adult in room when talking to a young person, or step down from your position all together. like I said I don't know much about the medication yet, and I am just a firm believer, that if this goes to a trial, or something like that then everyone on these medications( that we are now so bless to need just to live) will be labeled, and questioned. at what point do we as humans take responsibility for our actions??? Mixed emotions on whole thing. Do pray for the TRUTH to come out for the girls sake, and for the man. We have to be in control of this disease, not the disease controlling us. Sorry if it sounds like I am venting, just don't want to see the medication take the rap for a choice this man made. We make choices everyday, and hopefully they are to the best of our abilities to be honest, true, and respectful to ourselves, and others. You all have a great day. hopefully this is not offensive to anyone, just another point of view, or side to look at. Bless you all.

Edited by sarahjo, 11 June 2013 - 04:45 PM.


#7 LarryH0123

LarryH0123

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • LocationAiea, Hawaii

Posted 12 June 2013 - 09:55 PM

If a man under the influence of alcohol breaks the law and harms someone, is he not responsible for his actions? If a man under the influence of prescription medications breaks the law and harms someone is he not also responsible?

#8 christie

christie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:08 AM

If a man under the influence of alcohol breaks the law and harms someone, is he not responsible for his actions? If a man under the influence of prescription medications breaks the law and harms someone is he not also responsible?


We need a lawyer ! Stat ! Maybe two...OWV, Sean where are you? And a police officer ! Brad? All of you, get your busy.....(can't say that in a public forum, hahaha....) in here !

Well, from my point of view, alcohol abuse cannot be equaled or compared to legitimate use of prescription medications. And the insidious subconscious way the dopaminergic drugs mess with our brains and our impulse controls differs in so many ways from alcoholism. First and most important difference: you can never "sober out" from the influence of dopaminergics. unless you stop them completely. much like being drunk all the time. Only nobody can see it-including yourself. You can't realize it, can't make any choice, because all your actions are predetermined in your brain, and your brain can't fix itself. You are trapped in a virtual reality, like living in a nightmare or a psychotic-like state but you think it's real and others think it too. There's no blood, no screaming, no pain, nobody can see you are sick nobody can realize your are clearly so NOT responsible for your actions. Your actions are defined by a chemical substance which has taken the place of your will and your personality. Let's try take a real step into the world of drug-induced impulse control disorders...And make our best to avoid entering it. Cause once we get in there, there's no easy way out. And no "choice", no "determination" of any kind other than getting the drug out of our systems can give our lives back !

Edited by christie, 13 June 2013 - 04:09 AM.

-English is not my first language !

-Aged 39. Diagnosed at 35. On levodopa monotherapy (500mg daily).


#9 Rogerstar1

Rogerstar1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,776 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

Posted 13 June 2013 - 02:59 PM

I'll take a crack at that:

Generally we in the U.S. have taken a measure of pride in our justice system that seeks not to punish but instead treat and rehabilitate those who can neither (1) appreciate the wrongfulness of their conduct and/or (2) lack the capacity to conform their behavior to the requirements of the law. When disturbed people are in- capable of forming the necessary mens rea or mental state to be held criminally liable they are designated not guilty by reason of insanity.

All criminal offenses are comprised of 'elements' that the State, through it's prosecutor, must prove beyond a reasonable doubt to the satisfaction of all twelve jurors. The 'intent' to violate the law is just one element which must be established (proven) in order to convict a person of a crime. Cases in which a defendant asserts factual innocence as well as the lack of criminal intent (an insanity claim) are resolved in bifurcated proceedings by a jury that first determines the facts and upon determining culpability (criminal liability) turns to adjudicating whether the defendant had the requisite intent. Psychiatrists and psychologsts are generally called on to testify in disputed cases and their opinions are given considerable weight - particularly on whether a drug combination could interfere with thought and awareness processes undermining criminal intent.

All criminal offenses are either crimes of general intent or specific intent. The former require the prosecutor to introduce facts from extraneous sources bearing on the issue of a defendant's mental state and intention to break the law. For instance in the scenario at hand - did the PWP send emails to the purported victim asking her to meet with him secretly and not to tell anyone. On the other hand did he inquire of her along the lines of seeking to confirm she had reached her eighteenth year might cut the other way. Was the alleged 'kiss' a mere buss on the cheek accompanied by a hearty congratulations for graduating with honors? Specific intent crimes have an intent element also which is satisfied by credible proof that the defendant committed the act.

Short of a defense of mental insanity is a one of 'diminished capacity'. One who willfully reduces his sound judgement by, for instance, imbibing heavily before driving is legally precluded from invoking such a claim as a defense if he crashes into another driver causing injury. Were a driver taking medications as prescribed by his physician the issue gets far murkier.

And right now I'm becoming a little murky myself so will post what I've ginned up, to return later perhaps to clarify my two cents.


R.

Edited by Rogerstar1, 13 June 2013 - 03:00 PM.


#10 LarryH0123

LarryH0123

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • LocationAiea, Hawaii

Posted 14 June 2013 - 08:31 AM

Christie - I in no way meant to minimize the devastating effects of PD on PWP. I have seen it expressed in print on this and two other forums I participate in. I also I've spent hours talking in person to a friend who has had it for over 20 years. Although I have not experienced many of the horrible experiences you expressed yet I understand that I likely will in the years to come. I hope I didn't offend you with my questions.

Roger - thank you for a very thorough yet succinct explanation of judiciary proceedings and the thought provoking legal murkiness. I can see how the two are different in the eyes of the law.

I"m afraid I may be a bit jaded. I have worked in substance abuse treatment for the last 30 some years and 20 of those have been in correctional systems, mostly state prisons. I mention both because I have seen addicted people turn their lives around and have seen those with the criminal element (whether it was there before the addiction or after) change their thinking and subsequently their behavior as well. So I do believe people can change. I also believe that any crimes committed even at the height of their addiction where their behavior is driven by the cellular craving in their bodies, they are responsible for their own actions whatever they may be.

The 20 years in the correctional system has helped me to see that not everyone can change. I have looked into the blank stare of sociopathic eyes and seen the darkness therein. But they are the minority - I estimate 10 - to 15% at most and they are the ones we don't want to come back out. The rest will likely return to society to be our neighbors. The majority of inmates I have talked to who have not had their substance abuse or criminality addressed will tell you that they are totally innocent and in fact they themselves are the victims. Sex offenders frequently fit this category. I'm not saying the gentleman in the article is a sex offender but my very subjective guess is he may well be. I also believe that when offenders are not held accountable for whatever reason, it emboldens them to continue on in their devious pursuits.

As I said I may be jaded by my experiences but they are none the less my experiences and they have shaped my opinions over the years. Again it was not my intention to offend anyone, just expressing my opinions.

#11 christie

christie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 15 June 2013 - 04:18 AM

Christie - I in no way meant to minimize the devastating effects of PD on PWP. I have seen it expressed in print on this and two other forums I participate in. I also I've spent hours talking in person to a friend who has had it for over 20 years. Although I have not experienced many of the horrible experiences you expressed yet I understand that I likely will in the years to come. I hope I didn't offend you with my questions.


No, of course you didn't offend me ! Thank you for your kindness.
Just a few more comments on this issue: Impulse control disorders may be induced by dopaminergic drugs but only in a relatively small subset of patients with PD. There might be some predisposing factors to blame for that, but this remains to be studied. There are so many things we don't know yet about the human brain, especially in the context of degenerative diseases like PD. I didn't want to sound more alarming than i should have about the potential risk of impsulse control disorders. It's actually less than likely that any of us in this forum will experience this disorder in the years to come. Fingers crossed for that !

On the other hand, I still believe Larry that your valuable and considerable experience in substance abuse treatment has little relevance to behavioral disorders brought on by neuroleptics such as the dopaminergic drugs.

-English is not my first language !

-Aged 39. Diagnosed at 35. On levodopa monotherapy (500mg daily).





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users