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What's best exercise for the PD patient?


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#1 MrsTNdad

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 08:45 PM

My husband was recently diagnosed w/ PD. What exercise is best to help his stabilization & balance?

#2 Rogerstar1

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:13 PM

Swimming.  It's easier on joints.



#3 Annikin

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:55 PM

True, And a lot softer if you fall! :)  I also heard ballroom dancing is good for balance and 'freezing'. It helps that you have a partner when dancing.



#4 Luthersfaith

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:17 AM

Anything that he wants to do that he can do that helps him move.


"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

#5 Island Woman

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:21 AM

I do a movement for PD once a week plus stationary bike.  There's a very good CD out...Dance for PD at Home presented by Brooklyn Parkinson Grp.



#6 StrkL

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 12:45 PM

If he has problems with balance, he should probably do specific balance exercises. The following are balance exercises I was prescribed while in Physical Therapy.  (Plus some extensions of the exercises I’ve added myself.)  The first one is fairly elementary (if your symptoms aren’t too severe, but many people will still find it challenging):

 

A. Stand on two legs

  • Extend your arms out from shoulders, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Bend your knees slightly, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Look forward
  • Slowly rotate your head left, then right
  • Eventually do this exercise with your hands at your sides
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head steady
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head rotating slowly from side to side

 

The next one is considerably harder:

B. Stand heel-to-toe (right leg in back, left leg in front)

  • Extend your arms out from shoulders, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Bend your knees slightly, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Look forward
  • Slowly rotate your head left, then right
  • Eventually do this exercise with your hands at your sides
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head steady (this will likely be really hard)
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head rotating slowly from side to side

 

Then switch legs (left leg in front, right leg in back) and repeat.

The next one is about as difficult as B:

C. Stand on one leg

  • Extend your arms out from shoulders, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Bend your knees slightly, if you need to do so to maintain balance
  • Look forward
  • Slowly rotate your head left, then right
  • Eventually do this exercise with your hands at your sides
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head steady (this will likely be really hard)
  • Eventually do this exercise with your eyes closed and your head rotating slowly from side to side

 

The next one is also about as difficult as B:

D. Stand on one leg

  • Hold a five or ten pound dumbbell in one hand
  • Slowly swing the dumbbell counterclockwise around your waist
  • Switch hands as needed
  • Repeat 5-10 times
  • Reverse direction
  • Eventually do this with your eyes closed

 

You can also stand on a wobble board, on two legs, and eventually one leg.  And then you can try the wobble board - on one leg or two - with your eyes closed. For the record, I find B and C quite difficult with my eyes closed.  I can't do them at all with my eyes closed and head rotating.  I can't do D at all with my eyes closed.  I can do the wobble board with two legs, and with one (but not with my eyes closed).

I suspect that doing B, C, D, and the wobble board ones with eyes closed and head rotating would be challenging for anyone, Parkinson's or not.


StrkL

#7 Annikin

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 06:55 PM

I also have a Wii Fitness that has an entire set of balance related exercises disguised as games- it is actually recommended by the NPD. 



#8 TNdad

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:40 PM

Annikin,

Ballroom dancing? I'm reminded of Indiana Jones in the raiders of the last ark. Snakes, snakes, why did it have to be snakes!!
I feel the same about ballroom dancing. Ill admit I've watched my fair share of scantily clad dancers on dancing with the stars. But now my wife will hound me into the ballroom. Yikes!!

#9 MrsTNdad

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:10 PM

Thanks for all of your posts & care. After years nagging & begging, my husband & I finally tried Tai Chi for the first time. Albeit it only 30 min., I do feel I can breathe a bit better. I hope he does it too. Ballroom dancing would definitely be my best choice for his therapy.

#10 Annikin

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 07:43 PM

Ooops my bad, TN dad. Just play the PD card and step on her feet alot and she'll probably let you off the hook. She'll be none the wiser..... She's right behind me isn't she?  :)



#11 Golden01

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 09:25 PM

I think exercise is really important. Here's my thoughts of things to try:

 

1) Really good assessment by a physical therapist who sees mostly PD patients. My husband's PT helped us  find equipment we could buy for him to use at home (balance cushion, exercise bands, etc.).

2) Tai Chi. My husband goes to class especially for people with PD. It is supported by the local parkinson's group so he only pays $5 per class. 

3) BIG or BIG and Loud Therapy. Intense (1 hour a day, four days a week for four weeks). Well worth the time and effort. http://www.lsvtglobal.com/

4) Pole Walking. Lots of research on this one being conducted for people with PD. 

5) Biking. We are planning to get a recumbent bike for my husband. He bikes outside and uses a stationary bike now. Faster RPMs are recommended. 

6) Treadmill. We are also planning to invest in a treadmill. Need to turn a room into a mini-gym. 

7) PWR! Moves and Classes. My husband has been able to participate in the week-long retreats for the last two years. He attends a PWR! moves class once a week and does many of the exercises at home. http://www.pwr4life.org/   

 

Good luck. 


Edited by Golden01, 05 February 2014 - 09:39 AM.


#12 dbogler

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:11 PM

I don't know what is the best but I can tell you what I do. ! am 64 years old and have had PD about 6 years

 

1. In nice weather I try to walk 2 miles twice a week. For safety reasons (leaning forward and going faster than I can control) I always use a walking stick. Mine is a simple 5 foot stick made out of dogwood

 

2. I have a recumbent bike at home that I will get on for 30 minutes 3 times a week. From what I have researched a high rpm (70-80) with little or no resistance is better than lower rpm with some resistance. I have mine sitting in front of the tv in the living room

 

3. In the summer I will swim maybe once a week. And I walk backwards in the pool. If I fall - no big deal

 

4. I joined a health center and have a personal trainer 2 days a week for an hour. If you are like me when I first started I didn't know how to use the various machines so he was very useful,, The things we do are;

 

A. Moderate weight training. Be careful and not over do it or you will exasperate your PD

 

B. With someone holding me to keep me from falling I try to stand on 1 leg for 1-2 seconds

 

C. Again with someone holding me I walk backwards

 

D. I emphasize those weight training exercises that twist my body

 

E. Again with someone holding me I practice stepping up onto a 8 inch platform and also stepping over it 

 

F. Boxing. I have never thrown a punch in my life before but I really like this. My training partner puts on boxing mitts and moves his hands around. And I try to hit his mitts. Not only is it fun  and good for your coordination but it is also a good cardio workout. About 10 minutes is all I can do and I am pooped. I tell folks that I am getting ready to cage fight. What a joke.

 

G. And a new exercise I tried yesterday that I really liked is play catch with some one about 8 feet away using a 6 pound ball

 

If I had to just narrow it to 3 it would be walking, recumbent bike and those balance exercises with someone holding me in case I should try and fall.

 

Walking though is hard to beat. I had to relearn how to walk. A 90 year old speed walker showed me how to swing my arms. And since my place where I walk is around a state owned fish hatchery there is usually no one there but me.So sometimes I yell as loud as I can to exercise my vocal chords and if I do run across someone I just pretend that nothing happened. But do make or buy yourself a walking stick

 

 I try to get in 30-60 minutes of some kind of exercise at least 5 times a week and some days I will double up



#13 TNdad

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:20 PM

I like your spirit. I will defintely relay your enthusiasm to my husband. Keep exercise & carry on.

#14 MrsTNdad

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 09:05 PM

This is mrstndad's post

#15 Golden01

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:44 AM

dbogler - Love your list!!! You do amazing exercise. 

#16 livingwithtau

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 10:01 PM

There is a book called "Delay the Disease" available on Amazon with great exercises with pictures developed by a physician with Parkinson's and his personal trainer. The author works with patients in Ohio and helps teach physical therapists. One of mine at Vandi I Nashville trained with him. He has more than one book now as well as video.

#17 Brad24

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 07:28 PM

Whatever he likes to do. It is important that he does things at HIS fitness level. I love yoga and lifting weights. Swimming and just basic stretching exercises are good also. The most important thing is to start easy and work your way up slowly. Do not let him overdo it.

I also like dbogler's list a lot!!!

Edited by Brad24, 20 March 2014 - 07:31 PM.

DETERMINATION "In the heart of the strong shines a relentless ray of resolve...It cannot be stopped, it cannot be controlled, and it will not fail."

#18 Golden01

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 07:34 AM

New exercise book and DVD out from Dr. Becky Farley. Ordered one for my husband yesterday! Her exercise advice has helped him so very much. Now, if we can just figure out what it going on with his back so he can get back to the exercise he used to do. Recently started Sinemet to see if the tight muscles and pain was coming from being undermedicated, hasn't helped so it is back to his doctors to see what else they can figure out. 

 

http://www.pwr4life.org/pwrstore/


Edited by Golden01, 21 March 2014 - 07:35 AM.


#19 Curt732

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:29 AM

I am 67.  I was diagnosed in December last year.  Most of my care comes through the Vetrans Administration.  However I do have Anthem Blue Cross (ppo).  Anthem pays for a "silver sneeker" (high level unrestricted) membership at 24 hour fitness gym.  Several other gyms offer "silver sneeker" memberships as well.  I've never been much of a gym guy before but let me tell you, it has changed my life and given me a great deal of hope.  I paid a little extra for a personal trainer and told him straight out that I was recently diagnosed with Parkinsons so I had some balance issues and a few other things he would need to work with.  I told him I wanted to be very agressive.

 

This is my recomendation.

 

Curt



#20 Brad24

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:15 PM

I like you spirit Curt. I hit as hard as I can every day. Keep it up!
DETERMINATION "In the heart of the strong shines a relentless ray of resolve...It cannot be stopped, it cannot be controlled, and it will not fail."




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