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What's best exercise for the PD patient?


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#21 SherryKnuth

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:09 AM

I am on the treadmill 5x a week for exercise.  My physical therapist has me walking backwards part of the time to help with balance.  Obviously I have to hold onto the rails but is an excellent way to work on balance.  I also lift weights & use a theraband (stretchy band) to help with rigidity issues.   



#22 johnnys

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:58 PM

I am 67.  I was diagnosed in December last year.  Most of my care comes through the Vetrans Administration.  However I do have Anthem Blue Cross (ppo).  Anthem pays for a "silver sneeker" (high level unrestricted) membership at 24 hour fitness gym.  Several other gyms offer "silver sneeker" memberships as well.  I've never been much of a gym guy before but let me tell you, it has changed my life and given me a great deal of hope.  I paid a little extra for a personal trainer and told him straight out that I was recently diagnosed with Parkinsons so I had some balance issues and a few other things he would need to work with.  I told him I wanted to be very agressive.

 

This is my recomendation.

 

Curt

Hi Curt, just wanted to ask if you were a vietnam vet.The Va pays comp for parkinson if you were a in country vet. navy vets should soon also qualify

vet



#23 New normal

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 11:45 PM

Wow...luv this thread. Great ideas and motivation to jazz up my routine..I walk the desert and swim. But want to add the great passive exercises that can be done while relaxing ..and incorporated into your day without much effort...the exercise balls...sitting on them, or having them by your chair and using them for a foot rest. As u are watching the news, you can roll the ball back and forth and work your legs...you find you are exercising without even knowing it. Just a word for those who aren't as buff as some of you folks :)

#24 Annikin

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 10:07 PM

I bought one for work- it allows me ( forces me) to move  to stay balanced and not get stiff plus I can hide my difficulty sitting still by passing it off as small exercise moves.

 

On that note the Young Parkinson's newsletter today had a great article on the possible link between PD and mitochondria- in laymen's terms the power house of the cell. And lends support to the idea the exercise may be the single most important approach to PD. Something in YOPD appears to interrupt a necessary steps in getting the certain raw  materials to the mitochondria ( that's a real simple synopsis of the process that really quite complex and brilliant). When you exercise you actually do the only thing that seems to slow down Parkinson's- - you increase muscle mass and in doing so make more mitochondria. More of that means more energy.

 

The really cool thing about mitochondria is that it has its own unique DNA different then the nuclear DNA you get at conception- ( you get 1/2  of that kind of DNA from each of your parents), and it is capable of reproducing on its own- like the chloroplasts in plants these little power houses which you have in multiple copies in all your cells may actually be discrete organisms (bacteria to be exact) in their own right living in our cells as symbionts ( no I am not making this up- every biologist knows this) your cells provide the raw materials for the mitochondria and they produce the cells' energy- it happens in nature in more instances then you can imagine.  Coral reefs are a strong image that comes to mind. If the symbiont does not get what it needs it dies (in corals the coral heads eject the zooxanthellae- also called coral bleaching and both die). I f the mitochondria does not get what it needs it dies and eventually so does the cell it lives in.

 

Also something men are always shocked to hear and totally a side note- the only true genetic lines passed relatively unchanged from one generation to the next are the mitochondrial ones-  not passed on by you to your sons but rather passed on by mothers to their offspring along with 90% of cell content ( sorry guys you pass on 1/2 of your nuclear DNA and a little sugar to get the swimmers here they want to go and that's it) and then only passed on to the next generation by their daughters. 

 

So what brings me to my little biology lesson- all cells in your body possess mitochondria- including your brain- if they are on the right track with this research they may have found a target for PD- those little mitochondria. What ever interrupts the pathway that  fuels the mitochondria may be due to PD- seems promising given the huge decrease in energy reported by so many w/ YOPD. This would also support and further explain the benefit if exercise. The amount of mitochondria in a cell is usually highest in the higher energy cells like in muscles and lower in tissues like fat- they even contribute to the darker color of muscle tissues  as they are  reddish- brown color.     This is a line of research worthy of watching......



#25 johnnys

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 06:44 AM

I exercise about a half hour after I take sinemet. I add a little and it heps me get through.Weight training seems to help the best. My nordic trac is the remedy for a quicker mind and a stronger heart.Staying active ,dont sit to long,and be happy.being mindful to all our thoughts and acts will get us through.PD can't defeat us.



#26 Golden01

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 07:38 AM

Great new exercise book and DVD from Dr. Becky Farley a physical therapist in Tucson, Arizona. http://www.pwr4life.org/pwrstore/



#27 Didi

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:28 PM

Annikin, where can I find the article on PD and mitochondria?

Thanks



#28 Annikin

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 08:29 PM

Didi- I got it from  the APDA Young Parkinson's newsletter- Google APDA and sign up for their newsletter via email.  I got the newsletter a few days ago. If for some reason you cannot find it - let me know and I can forward the email to you if you like.



#29 Didi

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 02:59 PM

Annikin. How long did it take to get the newsletter. I know lots of times when you sign up you get them right away. But I signed up when I saw your post on April 2 and haven't received anything yet. I can't find anywhere on the website to search old newsletters either. So I am afraid by the time I get my newsletter it will be a new one without the article you mentioned. If you know any way to access the article online that would be great.

Thanks,

Didi



#30 Annikin

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:11 PM

I don't remember how long it took but I can forward it to you if you like.



#31 Annikin

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:16 PM

Didi- better yet I copied it and pasted it below....   New discoveries place lack of energy at the basis of Parkinson's disease March 20th, 2014 Neuroscientists Vanessa Moraïs and Bart De Strooper from VIB and KU Leuven have demonstrated how a defect in the gene Pink1 results in Parkinson's disease. By mapping this process at a molecular level, they have provided the ultimate proof that a deficient energy production process in cells can result in Parkinson's disease. These insights are so revolutionary that they have been published in the leading journalScience.

 

Vanessa Moraïs (VIB/KU Leuven) said: "Having Parkinson's disease means that you can no longer tell your own body what to do. The hope of finding a solution to this has stimulated me for many years to unravel what goes wrong in the cells of Parkinson's patients. This research is an important step forwards."

Bart De Strooper (VIB/KU Leuven) said: "Parkinson's disease is one of the research focuses in our department. It gives great satisfaction that we have unraveled a molecular process responsible for the faulty energy production process in cells of Parkinson's patients. This confirms our belief that repairing the energy production in cells is a possible therapeutic strategy."

Faulty energy production forms the basis of Parkinson's disease

Mitochondria are cell components that produce the energy required by a cell to function. The action of these mitochondria – and therefore the energy production in cells – is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. The exact mechanism was unknown. In recent years, scientists have described various gene defects (mutations) in Parkinson's patients that result in decreased activity of the mitochondria, including a mutation in the Pink1 gene.

Molecular mechanism provides ultimate proof

Vanessa Moraïs studied the link between Pink1, mitochondria and Parkinson's disease in fruit-flies and mice with a defective Pink1 gene. These model organisms exhibited symptoms of Parkinson's disease as a result of this defect. She was able to demonstrate that the defect in Pink1 resulted in the so-called 'Complex I' – a protein complex with a crucial role in the energy production of mitochondria – not being phosphorylated adequately, resulting in decreased energy production. When Moraïs and her colleagues ensured correct phosphorylation of Complex I, the Parkinson's symptoms decreased or disappeared in mice and in patient-derived stem cell lines. The scientists thereby demonstrated that the lack of phosphorylation causes Parkinson's disease in patients with a defect Pin1 gene.

Further research in Parkinson's patients with defective Pink1 gene

This study reveals that repairing the phosphorylation of Complex I could be a treatment strategy for Parkinson's disease. The VIB scientists have already used cells from Parkinson's patients with a defective Pink1 gene to demonstrate that repairing the phosphorylation results in increased energy production. However, will this cause the symptoms of Parkinson's disease to decrease or disappear? Only tests on patients can answer this question. According to the scientists, the best strategy would be to start with the sub-group of patients with a defective Pink1 gene. But before starting clinical trials, a lot of aspects still have to be tested.

Provided by VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.



#32 Didi

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 03:17 PM

Thank you so much Annikin!



#33 Annikin

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 10:42 PM

Anytime. :)



#34 jb49

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 12:27 PM


(My husband was recently diagnosed w/ PD. What exercise is best to help his stabilization & balance?)

 

 

I decided that I needed to do something to help me maintain some level of fitness. Something organized that would happen at least once a week and I stumbled into a Yoga class.   Sorry, stumbled into a Yoga class paints a picture for a Parky doesn't it.  Okay, I found a Yoga class and I went to it.  After getting started for a half hour or so, I was pretty sure that it wasn't for me and I thought I probably wouldn't be back.  The instructor must of read my mind. (it would be like a short story) because out of the blue he said there are 4 things that Yoga can do for you if you choose to continue on a regular basis.  You will develop core muscle strength, your balance will be improved, you will become more flexible.  And finally, Yoga can give you peace of mind and a reliever of stress.  I thought to myself,  "Self, this Parkinsons thing is screwing you up on all 4 categories, you better continue"  That was 3 years ago. Once a week I go to Yoga and I am much more flexible and in better condition than I would be if I never.  Actually, I may be even better than I was 3 years ago.  At age 56, I will take that.  So in answer to your "what is the best exercise for Parkinsons" question, I say Yoga.


Edited by jb49, 11 April 2014 - 12:30 PM.

Don't be hard on yourself, try your best and be strong!

#35 Annikin

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 07:16 PM

I agree wholeheartedyl, JB. I feel physically in balance and less stressed both physically and mentally after doing yoga.  And get this- I have no balance issues (outside of my being a clutz naturally), and I've had PD for at least 11 years- I still rollerblade.  There is also yoga just for folks w/ PD too if balance is an issue. I find the yoga greatly helps with my stiffness.  It also helps with breathing.  



#36 Delta

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 02:22 AM

The best exercise is . ... Any exercise you can do safely that you will do. I walk, play tennis and do yoga. I've been walking for the last 17 years and playin tennis for the last 7 years . Both prediagnosis. I started the yoga since I found out I have pd.
I've found the key with exercise pd or not is doing something you enjoy. No joy = no exercise. I think you see in the thread it really doesn't matter what the activity is. Keeping trying different types of exercise until you find something that sticks.




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