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Parkinson's and violent behavior


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#1 Roxannk

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:21 AM

Just joined the forum because I am overwhelmed by my husband's recent behavior. He was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's about 10 years ago and is 52 years old now. We have had heated arguments in the past, but never violent. Two nights ago he got very angry and slapped me in the face. And, last night he again got very angry and screamed at me for about 20 minutes, very abusive, and punched holes in the door and in the walls. He has never done anything like this before, and it is not even like it has been coming on, it just came out of the blue. We have an 8 year old daughter, and I am afraid, because he is totally out of control when this happens. I asked him to call the neurologist to see about medication that might cause this, he told the doctor he had become more "agitated." They said it might be the azilect. But he has been on the current dosage for 6 months. Has anyone heard of anything like this? Any advice? I'm at a loss as to the next step. 



#2 Daven

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:31 AM

I took Azilect for a couple of months but didn't exhibit that side effect.  However, when I first started using the Neupro patch I was on edge the entire time I used it.  I would snap at my wife for no reason.  After a bit I was able to recognize what was happening and was able to suppress this behavior.

 

Dave



#3 PatriotM

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:33 AM

The side effects listed for Azilect include mood/mental changes and agitation.  Could the Azilect (or some other drug) be causing this - YOU BET!

 

I used to take cyclobenzaprine for severe headaches.  My wife called them "nasty pills", because the drug made me very sensitive to sound.  It is very irritating to have someone talk to me and I frequently responded in a verbally unfriendly way.  I never hit anyone or anything like that, but I could certainly see how a drug could cause that to happen.



#4 coacht

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:36 AM

Check for a bladder infection or something like that too.

#5 JillianD

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 08:24 AM

After my husband had been on Azilect for 6 months, it suddenly became impossible for me to have a rational discussions with him, and he became totally verbally abuse, particularly about matters importnat to me that he totally misinterpreted. 

About 8 months later the neurologist suddenly stopped the Azilect and put him onto low dose dopamine.   Azilect tries to ensure the body utilises excess dopamine by preventing the body from reabsorbing it, it does not add dopamine to the patient.  He was underdosed with dopamine for the next 2 years and remained impossible like an addict who is continually looking for a fix and an argument.  

3 years later he is now takes 2 drugs for his PD every 2.5hrs during the day and is much better - although I am still very hesitant to talk to him about matters that are important to me.   So, yes, my experience of Azilect was a major behaviour shift that left me stunned and shocked and unable to work out what to do for a long time.



#6 Roxannk

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 12:17 PM

Thank you everyone, especially Jillian for your story. My husband's dr. has decreased his dosage of Azilect from 1 mg to 1/2 mg. We have talked things out a little and are trying to get past it. The problem is, as you mentioned, now I am afraid to bring things up, afraid to be alone with him, and would rather be at work. I'm sure that will change over time, but right now it is a horrible feeling. We are going to try counseling, as well.



#7 johnnys

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 08:31 PM

I have had temper problems all my life long before PD.

I learned how to control my temper(fear and anger)at www.lowselfhelpsystems.org

I know live well even with PD knowing my tempers are controled and I have peace.Just ask my wife.lol



#8 Trying hard

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 10:11 PM

What about alexithamia?  It's where PWP cannot recognize their own emotions, and can't recognize others  either.  They have trouble experiencing empathy, and are unable to comprehend or respond to others emotions, and because of it their emotions become really intense, like panic attacks, extreme anxiety and violent outbursts, or they just don't react at all even when they should.  My DH has had all of those except the violent behavior, though I am waiting for that day.  The DBS really helped with the motor problems, but I've been living with all these non-motor symptoms for years.  I have to constantly remind myself that he no longer can be reasonable, rational, or logical, and his memory is so bad now that he doesn't remember anything much of what he does.  I don't know if this is your case or not but I do understand what you are going through, might be something to bring up with neuro,  Just a thought, good luck.



#9 coacht

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 08:31 AM

Thanks for posting about alexithamia. It is more of no empathy for us, but lots for others. It makes things difficult for sure.

#10 Trying hard

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 02:30 PM

So for you what matters?  If you have no empathy, how do you deal with it?  For me I'm trying really hard to understand if there is anything that takes the place of empathy.  Why do you think some have lots of empathy and others none?  I think I already know the answer, no one knows :)

Thanks for sharing Coacht.



#11 coacht

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:38 AM

I just keep going. I know that if I accomplish something it will be no big deal for her. An example, I received a patent and when I told her she said good and walked away. A big let down. My son and I won a national championship with a bull of ours. She told
me she was glad I had a good time and that was it. It was a big deal. She has no empathy for how we have to deal with her messes
and takes us for granted when we clean up after her. That is the type of thing I mean about empathy. Also when I talked to her about it she broke down and cried, not for what she did to us, but that she wasn't doing things right. It was about her, not us. She didn't really care about our feelings.

#12 Trying hard

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 01:14 PM

Congrats to you for your patent and to your son for national championship, must have been magical for you both.  Having a small ranch and been involved in all kinds of ranching I know it's not easy winning a championship without a lot of hard work.

I don't think it's that she doesn't care, the brain doesn't let her  process.  For me it's not tears.    I get blamed for ............. well everything.  Someday I'll design a T-Shirt, something cute, and it'll be my suit of armor.:)   I've decided that for me it's the non-motor that is far worse that the motor - PWP loose both, that's what makes it sooooooooooooooo difficult.

Again congrats to both of you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :)



#13 Rogerstar1

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:07 PM

CoachT...what was your patent on?



#14 coacht

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:45 AM

Roger,
It was for a fluid applicator for applying herbicides or liquid fertilizer. No big company was interested though. I haven't had the time or energy to get much else done so far. I am going to start working on it again here soon. I agree that the non motor is
far more disruptive for our family. Especially when a couple of kids like things just so and get into a lot of arguments with her. Also since there is confusion, especially with the artane, then her judgment of what is happening to her is even impaired.Anxiety doesn't help at all either. the house and meals are a disaster, especially when pride steps in and that is not related to PD.
Thanks for asking Roger.

#15 afroney

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 06:56 PM

So for you what matters? If you have no empathy, how do you deal with it? For me I'm trying really hard to understand if there is anything that takes the place of empathy. Why do you think some have lots of empathy and others none? I think I already know the answer, no one knows :)
Thanks for sharing Coacht.


I actually find the Parkinson's Apathy/lack of empathy to be pleasant. It's nice floating through life without a care in the world.

#16 johnnys

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 09:25 PM

 Ive had PD now for 5 yerars and wouldnt want ever to go off medsActualy right now I have almost zero apathy and more empathy then i ever thought possible.I think the answer is I avoid temper(fear and anger)and the sun shines through..

More people should concentrate on getting  their tempers(fear and anger) controled if they want to be at peace and be able to feel for others,

The world would be a paradise if temper  was made anti-social.






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