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A thread for anyone interested in topics of Christian faith--all invited.

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1448 replies to this topic

#1441 Linda Garren

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 08:29 AM

God’s Spirit Is Working in You By Rick Warren — Jan 14, 2017     01-14-17-personal-change-gods-spirit-is-    

“God is working in you, giving you the desire and the power to do what pleases him” (Philippians 2:13 NLT, second edition).

 

It is the Holy Spirit’s job to produce Christlike character in you.

 

The Bible says, “The Lord ... makes us more and more like him as we are changed into his glorious image” (2 Corinthians 3:18b NLT, second edition). This process of changing us to be more like Jesus is called sanctification.

 

You cannot reproduce the character of Jesus in your own strength. New Year’s resolutions, willpower, and best intentions are not enough. Only the Holy Spirit has the power to make the changes God wants to make in our lives. The Bible says, “God is working in you, giving you the desire and the power to do what pleases him” (Philippians 2:13 NLT, second edition).

 

Mention the “power of the Holy Spirit,” and many people think of miraculous demonstrations and intense emotions. But most of the time the Holy Spirit’s power is released in your life in quiet, unassuming ways that you aren’t even aware of or feel. He often nudges us with “a gentle whisper” (1 Kings 19:12b NIV).

 

Christlikeness is not produced by imitation but by inhabitation. We allow Christ to live through us. “This is the secret: Christ lives in you” (Colossians 1:27 NLT, second edition).

 

How does this happen in real life? Through the choices we make. We choose to do the right thing in situations and then trust God’s Spirit to give us his power, love, faith, and wisdom to do it. Since God’s Spirit lives inside of us, these things are always available for the asking.

 

Talk It Over

  • Why do you think God allows you to choose whether or not you respond to the Holy Spirit’s moving in your life?
  • If the Holy Spirit often works in quiet, unassuming ways, what can you do to become more sensitive to his work in your life?

Edited by Linda Garren, 14 January 2017 - 08:30 AM.

Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1442 Linda Garren

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 10:03 AM

MLK Quote of the Day: “Everywhere and at all times, the love ethic of Jesus is a radiant light revealing the ugliness of our stale conformity…Any Christian who blindly accepts the opinions of the majority and in fear and timidity follows a path of expediency and social approval is a mental and spiritual slave.”


Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1443 Linda Garren

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 11:52 AM

Note from Linda:  I'm posting this in an effort to urge prayer for our president and the future of our country.  What we see is what we get with Trump, and it is indeed frightening, as it will most likely not change, and there is no cure--save for the Lord's interception.  Please join in prayer that his aides and other appointees continue to speak to what the party stands for, as well as "clarify" the things Trump says while probably biting their tongues not to disparage him.  Following is taken from an article in the Huffington Post from last summer:

There is nothing more “current” or important than Donald Trump’s psychological fitness to be president....There is only one organizing principle which makes sense of his wildly oscillating utterances and behavior - the clinical definition of narcissistic personality disorder.

The Mayo Clinic describes it as a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance, a deep need for admiration, and a lack of empathy for others.  An exaggerated sense of self-importance. An unwarranted belief in your own superiority. A preoccupation with fantasies of your own success, power and brilliance. A craving for constant admiration. A consuming sense of entitlement. An expectation of special favors and unquestioning compliance.  A penchant for exploiting or disparaging others. A total inability to recognize the needs of anyone else. An incapacity to see those you meet as separate human beings. An unreasoning fury at people you perceive as thwarting your wishes or desires. A tendency to act on impulse. A superficial charm deployed to disguise a gift for manipulation.  A need to always be right. A refusal to acknowledge error. An inability to tolerate criticism or critics. A compulsion to conform your ever-shifting sense of “reality” to satisfy your inner requirements . A tendency to lie so frequently and routinely that objective truth loses all meaning.  A belief that you are above the rules. An array of inconsistent statements and behaviors driven by your needs in the moment. An inability to assess the consequences of your actions in new or complex situations. In sum, a total incapacity to separate the world from your own psychodrama.


Edited by Linda Garren, 16 January 2017 - 12:23 PM.

Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1444 God is with us

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 11:08 AM

 

NN, thank you for sharing your background with me. I can identify, as I was once there, too, where I kept my distance from Christians because of such discomfort. And I know exactly--exactly--what you mean about how God worked within you to bring you closer to Him, and how the Holy Spirit worked in you to ensure and seal your faith.  Belief in Him comes from our being open to Him and then He takes it from there.  It's not something someone can convince another about.
 
I surely hope it was clear what I was doing in setting up the thread--that I wanted people to CHOOSE whether to read things Christian or not--and that anyone interested in or who already is a Christian would feel comfortable to come on in. I also think this helps others who have strong beliefs in something else to feel free to start a thread of their own about that belief so that people can understand theirs better.
 
And I also pray it is clear that this is not a thread to proselytize, but to share, be encouraged, bring in questions (seekers), and remain a safe harbor where Christians can openly discuss what God is doing in their lives and/or who may have questions to ask other believers.

 

 

Thank you for starting this. I am a caregiver of my husband who has PD. He was diagnosed last July 2016. Both husband and I have gotten to God. We both were brought up in the church so we Believe in the Father Son and Holy Spirit. And so thankful to our parents. And our children are grown and out of the house and doing good. My husband has somewhat accepted this disease and I know it might take sometime for him to be more engaged as to what he can do to help himself. He has a hard time to remember to take his pd meds and routine meds for blood pressure and diabetes type 2. And that is my main role right now to make sure he takes the meds. And I retired in December 2016 and I believe God had this all planned out for us. We both pray everyday before hubby goes to work. He is a farmer and right now things are slow. And I keep praying throughout the day for knowledge strength wisdom kindness to keep household things running smoothly. I have asked hubby about signing up with a boxing class or a pd dancing class and he says he will start walking on our treadmill. As of now that hasn't happen yet. I see and feel the tremors small as they are and I just want to squeeze him! Sound silly? oh well. He is taking Sinemet 25/100 and that has helped his sense of balance. Since July 2016 it just seems the pd is slowly getting worse. I am getting track so to tell the doctor in February. I sometimes have a hard time understanding that my hubby doesn't see what I see. I know it will be ok because I have a God who loves and listens and helps. And sometimes helps more than expected. I could go on and on but I just want to thank you for being a Christian and sharing. Hope to talk later Have a great day:)



#1445 Linda Garren

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 11:40 AM

Hello, God is with us.  It is so nice to read your post and feel your deep faith in the Lord throughout.  I'm glad you know of His love and that He listens and helps--sometimes more than expected.  Those of us who also believe in Him have experienced that and can understand how much that means.

 

There are many wonderful people here on the Forum whom you will find extraordinarily kind and helpful and compassionate who are in similar situations.  They share some of the same frustrations and can empathize thoroughly with what you are going through.  If you haven't checked the Caregivers thread yet, I'd encourage you to.  And as a PWP myself, I have the same issues your husband does--having a hard time remembering to take my meds (except when I'm home and can use the oven timer to remind me every four hours, which works pretty well).  There are sites on line that have watches with timers--even one that is a pillbox that is worn as a watch so that when the timer goes off, he can just open the box and take his meds (but would always of course have to have something to drink nearby to take them).

 

You and your husband are both now in a new stage of life--you in retirement, and he with PD--both of which are adjustments.  It sounds like you have thought everything through so thoroughly, are grateful for the Lord's leading and grateful that you both lean on Him, and obvious that you have a very loving marriage.  It touches me when you say you just want to squeeze him when you feel his slight tremors.  It doesn't sound silly at all.  And your keeping track of those things you see progressing is excellent so you can share those objective things with his doctor to help him know better what meds and how much may help him.  I'd encourage you to share your concern with his doctor about his not seeming to be able to see what you do.  He may be able somehow to help you both with that--as to understanding it and maybe some hints for dealing with it.   May I ask if he is working with an MDS (movement disorders specialist) for his PD?  We have found that to be essential, as many physicians (even neurologists) are not familiar enough with PD to help like an MDS can.

 

I want to let you know, too, that your post has greatly encouraged me, as I have been very down for a week or so, not sure whether this thread should continue or not and not sure I should even continue in the Forum as a whole. As I've visited other threads I have heard from so many who don't believe in the Lord and let it be known.  That's been terribly depressing to me, and humanly speaking has been very discouraging.  I had to keep reminding myself that Jesus said to expect that.  I've been praying for the Lord's direction and help to get me back to where I was in the commitment I made to keep the thread going whether others entered in or not, as long as the views shown stayed consistent, indicating hat people have been interested enough to read. 

 

Welcome to the Forum, God is with us.  I know we will be very blessed by your being a part of us.  :-)


Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1446 Linda Garren

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 12:35 PM

DENISON FORUM

Cultural Commentary

 

A psychologist named Cliff Arnall christened the third Monday in January as “Blue Monday.” According to him, the weather, debt from the holidays, and broken New Year’s resolutions combined to make yesterday “the most depressing day of the year.” Except that it wasn’t. Psychologists say the formula Arnall used has been “effectively debunked” and tell us that “there is no such thing as the most depressing day of the year.”

 

Consider some other news that doesn’t say what we might think it says.

 

Gallup is reporting: “In US, More Adults Identifying as LGBT.” If that’s all you read, you might assume that their percentage is escalating. If you measure the number of LGBT people in America by the frequency with which they are portrayed in movies and on television, you might assume that a quarter of the population is LGBT. Unsurprisingly, according to a recent survey, Americans estimate that 23 percent of Americans are gay or lesbian.

 

Here’s the fact: the LGBT portion of the American population has risen from 3.5 percent to 4.1 percent over the last four years. The percentage equates to ten million of the nation’s 326 million people.

 

Another example: despite published reports, Christians who regularly attend worship do not divorce at a higher rate than non-Christians. The opposite is true, in fact. And another: despite conventional wisdom, biblical Christianity is not declining in America. What is declining is the number of people who attend theologically liberal denominations. And what is especially declining is the number of nominal Christians. Many no longer consider themselves Christians, joining the ranks of the “nones.”

 

Paradoxically, the last fact is very good news.

 

Several years ago, a couple moved from Manhattan to Dallas and joined the church where I was pastor. The husband made the surprising observation that it was easier to be a Christian in New York City than in Dallas. He explained that in Manhattan everyone knows if they are Christian or not. There is no spiritual ambiguity. In Dallas, by contrast, many say they are Christians because they’re not Jewish or Muslim and have a membership in a church somewhere. He noted that “Churchianity” can be a major obstacle to Christianity.

 

My friend was right.

 

Dietrich Bonhoeffer warned that “cheap grace is the deadly enemy of our Church.” He defined our enemy: “Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.”

 

Bonhoeffer calls us to “costly grace” which “is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life.”

 

A culture that confuses fact with opinion and insists on tolerance over truth is no friend to biblical discipleship. Christians in America who stand publicly for basic biblical morality are more likely to face rejection than at any time in my lifetime. But our challenge is our opportunity. You and I have the privilege of joining the apostles in obeying God rather than men (Acts 5:29) and, if opposed, “rejoicing that [we] were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the name” (v. 41).

 

When last did it cost you something significant to follow Jesus?

 

Publication date: January 17, 2017

 

For more from the Denison Forum on Truth and Culture, please visit www.denisonforum.org.


Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1447 Rogerstar1

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Posted Yesterday, 10:52 PM



#1448 Linda Garren

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Posted Today, 12:28 AM

Thank you so much for sharing this, Roger.  O did a nice job with the eulogy.  His speaking skills have always been such an incredibly strong trait.

 

The shooting was such an awful, awful, tragedy.  The prayer group having invited the young man in to join them, it is just beyond our understanding how he could then have done what he did to those sweet people, most of them elderly.  Such a terrible loss.  And such a tragedy for the shooter who has continued to show no remorse.


Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 


#1449 Linda Garren

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Posted Today, 08:20 AM

IN TOUCH MINISTRIES

Daily Devotional

Dr. Charles Stanley

 

Our Convictions Our Defense

Romans 14:20-23

A person of conviction has become convinced, by either evidence or argument, that his beliefs are true. Today, most men and women would rather live by preference than conviction. They choose to believe something based on certain conditions and circumstances. When the situation changes, so does their loyalty. In other words, a lot of people vacillate on issues that require a firm resolve.

Contrast this wishy-washy approach with the mindset of the great men and women of Scripture. Despite many years of unfair treatment, Joseph never wavered in his commitment to godly principles . As a result, he was in the right place at the right time to ensure Israel’s survival (Gen. 50:20). Daniel, another righteous man in an idolatrous land, earned the trust of foreign kings by standing firm in his beliefs (Dan. 1:20). When his friends Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego also refused to compromise their beliefs, they influenced a king to recognize Jehovah as the one true God (3:29).

As these biblical heroes show, godly convictions can withstand the changing winds of opinion and the persuasive arguments of opponents. If we are grounded in the Word and trust what God has said, we can stand firm in our beliefs. Confidence breeds the courage to remain strong amid conflict.

Instead of following your own preferences, choose to live by godly conviction. The Bible has much to say about the most important aspects of your life. See if God’s principles and promises hold true. Through prayer and study, allow Him to firmly root you in solid biblical convictions.

For more biblical teaching and resources from Dr. Charles Stanley, please visit www.intouch.org.

 


Age 69.  Retired from Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions after 36 years in a number of administrative coordination positions for Deans and Department Directors within the various institutions.

Diagnosed with PD summer 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 





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