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Phospholipid Exchange Therapy (PLX) for BBB repair?


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#1 Guest__*

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 05:43 AM

Phospholipid Exchange Therapy (PLX) for BBB (Blood Brain Barrier) repair?

I came across this as a form of treatment (Phospholipid Exchange Therapy (PLX) ) to repair the permeability of cell wall. Could this also apply to repairing leaky BBB (Blood Brain Barrier)?

see: http://www.health-re...._syndromes.htm

Dr. Sarah Myhill my clinician who specialises in treating Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and advises generally on neurological disorders says the following:

“LIPID EXCHANGE – the idea here is to replace contaminated fats in cell membranes and fatty organs with clean fats. This technique has been pioneered by Patricia Kane in America, who uses intravenous organic phospholipids in patients with problems such as Parkinson’s disease, autism, motor neurone disease, or whatever to flush out neurotoxins stuck in fats in brain cells. She sees remarkable success. Similar results can be achieved by taking fats by mouth, but they are not quite so dramatic.

Oral therapy would include high dose organic phospholipids such as lecithin and egg yolk, combined with essential fatty acids from the Omega 3 and 6 series (It does not have to be done iv – it can be done orally with Phospholipids (in the form of lecithin, egg or soya) together with high dose EFAs such as Nutri brain sharp Eskimo oil"

Can anyone with an understanding of cell wall permeability help? Can I safely undertake this procedure for both CFS & PD?

Kenki

For information on what is BBB see the excellent contribution from Dr.Ron Hutton:

http://www.pdonliner... ... barrier-pd

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#2 Kathrynne Holden, MS

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 01:53 PM

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Dear Kenki,

Unfortunately, I could not click through to the health-report URL, so I can’t evaluate the content of the article. The information on the Fox Foundation website is excellent but makes no reference to Phospholipid Exchange Therapy. I cannot find any reference to the therapy on the Pubmed site.

I speculate that the treatment has not been studied with regard to PD at this time and thus cannot be usefully discussed. However, the doctors on “Ask the Doctor” may be much better informed than I, and I would certainly submit your question there. If you find any further information, I hope you’ll let us all know.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

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#3 Guest__*

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 04:33 AM

Please try this URL link. Hope it works:

http://www.health-re... ... dromes.htm

#4 Kathrynne Holden, MS

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:57 AM

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Dear Kenki,

I would like to be more positive with regard to this therapy, but it is difficult. Here are my comments:

I am very much in favor of organic products and of natural treatments wherever possible. However, I note that the website is based upon, and actively marketing, multi-level marketing. MLM organizations are not necessarily providers of inferior products, but they often overstate the worth and effectiveness of the products they offer.

The article is not well focused, nor in places even very well-written. A good review article provides superscripts directing the reader to the appropriate endnote when making statements that require supporting evidence. There are ample endnotes, but it’s difficult to determine which part of the article some of them support. This is unprofessional – often a way of making the reader think the article is well researched whether it is or not.

The references in the endnotes are at least seven years old, some going as far back as the 1960s. This is perfectly acceptable in a review article. However, one expects that a therapy claiming such widespread and remarkable results will base its claims on its own research, along with recent references.

I am sorry that I cannot recommend use of this therapy. I am not convinced that it is either safe or effective for either PD or CFS. However, the doctors on “Ask the Doctor” may well have much more information than I, and I would certainly direct your questions to them.

Meantime, I will separately post some information on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome that might be of interest. I recall that you had a bypass operation, and wonder if you have been using a statin drug since then. You mentioned you take CoQ10, but you do not say how much. You might like to ask your neurologist to test your plasma CoQ10 to see if you require a higher amount.
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

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#5 Kathrynne Holden, MS

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:59 AM

Neuro Endocrinol Lett.;30(4).
[Epub ahead of print]
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency in myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is related to fatigue, autonomic and neurocognitive symptoms and is another risk factor explaining the early mortality in ME/CFS due to cardi.

Maes M, Mihaylova I, Kubera M, Uytterhoeven M, Vrydags N, Bosmans E.

Maes Clinics, Antwerp, Belgium. crc.mh@telenet.be.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a medical illness characterized by disorders in inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways.This paper examines the role of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a mitochondrial nutrient which acts as an essential cofactor for the production of ATP in mitochondria and which displays significant antioxidant activities.Plasma CoQ10 has been assayed in 58 patients with ME/CFS and in 22 normal controls; the relationships between CoQ10 and the severity of ME/CFS as measured by means of the FibroFatigue (FF) scale were measured. Plasma CoQ10 was significantly (p=0.00001) lower in ME/CFS patients than in normal controls. Up to 44.8% of patients with ME/CFS had values beneath the lowest plasma CoQ10 value detected in the normal controls, i.e. 490 mug/L. In ME/CFS, there were significant and inverse relationships between CoQ10 and the total score on the FF scale, fatigue and autonomic symptoms. Patients with very low CoQ10 (<390 mug/L) suffered significantly more from concentration and memory disturbances. The results show that lowered levels of CoQ10 play a role in the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and that symptoms, such as fatigue, and autonomic and neurocognitive symptoms may be caused by CoQ10 depletion. Our results suggest that patients with ME/CFS would benefit from CoQ10 supplementation in order to normalize the low CoQ10 syndrome and the IO&NS disorders. The findings that lower CoQ10 is an independent predictor of chronic heart failure (CHF) and mortality due to CHF may explain previous reports that the mean age of ME/CFS patients dying from CHF is 25 years younger than the age of those dying from CHF in the general population. Since statins significantly decrease plasma CoQ10, ME/CFS should be regarded as a relative contraindication for treatment with statins without CoQ10 supplementation.

PMID: 20010505 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Best regards,

Kathrynne Holden, MS

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