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Parkinsonism & Depression


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#1 NeuroResearcher

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 10:35 AM

PARKINSONISM AND DEPRESSION STUDY

Dear all,

I am a researcher at The College of West Anglia conducting a study into the relationship between parkinsonism and depression.
The links between Parkinson's Disease and depression are well documented. This study seeks to further this research, and extends the investigation to also include parkinson's plus syndromes.

It would be greatly appreciated if those of you who are eligible could contribute to this research by completing the questionnaire located at the following link:
http://spreadsheets....b1VqaF8wT3pXdkE

Those eligible are people with Parkinson's Disease, Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, and Cortical Basal Degeneration.

Friends/family members of an individual with one of these conditions may complete the questionnaire, however the responses given must be those dictated by the eligible individual.


Many thanks,
 
Cheryll Otu
BSc (Hons) Dunelm



"Hope through research".

#2 netgypsy

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 12:34 PM

There is a serious problem with this survey. it does not take into account the huge differences the person may have when meds are working and when they are not. You need to at least be clear about whether the answers should be "on meds" or "off meds".

In my case for example my problem for years has been anxiety, not depression. I may have been depressed because I had such severe anxiety but that's different from idiopathic depression.

And "on meds" I have no anxiety, thus no depression. So surveys like this are very difficult to answer when so many of us have a huge swing in both physical and mental function and state because of the various environmental factors that affect the functionality of our med.

#3 alexjoan

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:55 AM

The association between Parkinson's disease and depression and presents evidence to support the hypothesis that depression may be not only reactive but biochemically related to the disease. A psychotically depressed patient with parkinsonism responded positively to ECT as shown by improvement on a depression rating scale, two extrapyramidal rating scales, and handwriting samples. The beneficial effect on parkinsonian signs occurred before the improvement in depression, which suggests that ECT has a specific antiparkinsonian effect. Possible explanations for this observation based on biochemical theories of depression are discussed.

#4 Angus Deniel

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:19 AM

Nice Link! Thanks for sharing this study.

#5 lethe

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 07:33 AM

The association between Parkinson's disease and depression and presents evidence to support the hypothesis that depression may be not only reactive but biochemically related to the disease.


The hypothess? Is it not well-established already that the loss of dopamine affects other chemical processes such as seratonin etc. and can lead to depression? This study sound awfully redundant. As usual "researchers" trying to prove what PD patients know through experience. I can certainly tell the difference between depression from reactive sources and from chemical imbalance.

#6 johnnys

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 11:15 AM

Since i was diagnosised with Parkinson I"ve been using my Recovery Inc.method alot more.I came across a chapter in Dr Low's book,manage your fear and anger.he talked about how fear can create a psychological condition.He mentioned how the fear of a disease is often far worse than the actual disease.I found this very true with some of the symptoms I've been having.So I have been very busy strengthening my nervous constitution to ward off nervous symptoms the other day .I truely belive in Dr. low's method and I'm sure it will help everyone who uses it.Now I look forward to my frustrations in daily life as it gives me excellent practice to gain strength over my nervous symptoms some call depression.

#7 Smiling

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:52 PM

Hi all. I was beginning to think I was crazy until I started reading all the research on Parkinson's and depression. I have been diagnosed for 1 1/2 years but probably had the disease for 3 years before diagnosis. Over the past 6 months my depression has gotten worse. I take 4 mgs of Atavan a day which takes care of my anxiety and has totally eliminated my full body temor. But I wake up sad and go to bed sad. I do take Citalopam but it does not seem to be working. I have had the full body tremors constantly, no center of balance with frequent falls, inability to write normally, unable to cut meat or open a bottle or tie my shoes, Diminishing of my voice strength and need for walker and cane. However, the Carbidopa/Levadopa made an immediate difference in these symptoms. The addition of Ropinirole and Amantadine has helped as well. My dyskinesia gets really tough in the afternoon and we have not yet found a solution yet.

Sorry, I just need to bitch out loud to people who understand it's not a pity party but a release of frustration that most days bring a "new normal". The depression is really the toughest adjustment. I have always been a glass half full girl who believed everything had a solution. Ha. In the past 2 1/2 years I have had brain surgery to clip a 1 centimeter anyuerism connected to both anterior communicating arteries followed 6 months later by a lumbar fusion laminectomy instrumented. A year later I was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. Now after 38 of marriage my husband and I are getting a divorce because he can't bear the thought of staying with me to the end and spending all of his retirement money to care for me. Plus he doesn't like sick people who are not normal.

Hey everyone. Have a good night and a happy new year. thanks for being hear to listen. This is too much to dump on loved ones like my kids or siblings.

Peace
Rory

#8 Jenette

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:24 AM

Your husband is an ass

#9 Smiling

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 05:30 AM

Thanks. Good to know I am not a voice unheard/

#10 Ken_S

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

I agree with Jenette; if that is truly how your husband feels, he needs some serious attitude adjustment. I hope the best for you Rory.

Improvise, Adapt and Overcome


#11 Golden01

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 08:29 AM

Get a good lawyer. If you have been married 38 years, that retirement money is "ours" not "his". You might think about having two attorneys, a good divorce lawyer and one that specializes in planning for people with health problems. While you don't want a pity party or to dump on your kids and siblings, do keep them informed and work on keeping good relationships with them. They will be there when that husband is not.

Edited by Golden01, 09 January 2013 - 07:54 PM.


#12 Daven

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 09:21 AM

I agree with Golden, that retirement fund is half yours. Make sure you get your fare share.

Dave

#13 Golden01

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:53 AM

A couple more thoughts for you to consider. Are you experiencing facial masking? Most folks with PD that I know don't recognize this symptom even though they have it. If you do, you may have to take extra steps to be sure your kids and siblings are correctly interpreting your feelings and concerns. Also, in managing your depression, are you seeing a counselor that really knows PD? I think the issues coming from PD may not always be recognized or responded to by expert in one area that haven't worked in PD. My husband's MDS gave us the name of a counselor that works with a number of PD patients when we were coming up on a time that was gong to be particularly stressful. We ended up sailing through and not making an appointment but we keep the name should he develop depression or we have other concerns. Just food for thought. Know that there are a lot of folks on this discussion group that are sending good wishes your way.

#14 Beau's Mom

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:43 PM

I now find myself in the same position: my husband will not be a true husband. He doesn't want to live with me, take care of me or be there for me emotionally, or even touch me. He wants to just "be friends" and stay married. It is his unwillingness to deal with his own depression and feelings about his sister's death from PD that is ending our marriage.
Dianne

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

#15 Jenette

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 06:13 AM

I'm sorry to hear that. I don't understand these spouses. Maybe they're scared just llike the rest of us.

#16 annfisher43

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 10:55 PM

Sorry to hear. But sounds like you are getting some good advice

#17 Golden01

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:53 AM

I think PD really scares all of us. The stress of those around us leaving must compound those fears. I can remember when my husband was first diagnosed, the pure anger I felt (not at him but the situation) over the financial impact this disease would have on us. It took me two or three years to move past that. I didn't see a counselor skilled in PD issues but probably should have at that time. I hadn't yet discovered these discussion groups either, that might might have helped me too. If that anger ended up focused on the person not the PD, I can understand how difficult it must be, especially for the person with PD.

Smiling, more food for thought this morning. How often are you seeing your MDS? During this hard time, you may want to see him/her more often and be sure the impact of this stress is well-documented in your medical record. When my husband was getting close to going on disability, his job was very stressful (symptoms skyrocketed). He saw his doctors monthly (internist during short-term disabiliity and MDS when long-term disability became our reality). Ensuring the medical records reflect the severity of the disease and what you are going through is affecting it may be important down the road when the decisions on how much of his retirement earnings you will get are made. So along with those visits to your lawyers, you may need to go to the doctor more often too!

Edited by Golden01, 12 January 2013 - 12:58 PM.


#18 Luthersfaith

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:24 AM

Your husband is an ass

...hole. OOPS.. I mean "whole"

Edited by Luthersfaith, 14 January 2013 - 07:43 PM.

"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

#19 Beau's Mom

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:01 PM

Thank you all for your support and encouragement. I feel happy knowing there is a huge family here that will not blame me or my PD symptoms for their feelings, fears, and misery. i have chosen, just for today, to not let fear affect my behavior or my relationships in any way. If I forget that for any period of time this day, I will forgive myself, remember that I cannot be or express myself as anything other than what I truly am: LOVE.
Dianne

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

#20 Gardener

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:44 AM

I'm going to go out on a limb here, but it occurs to me that we all have physical and mental challenges (parkinsons or no parkinsons) and it's important to remember that just because we are diagnosed with this disease we can't expect our loved ones to carry the burden. We must do that ourselves to the extent that we can. My husband is pushing 70 and has a 57 year-old wife with parkinsons. Most of the time he feels worse than I do but unfortunately there is no medicine for getting old and there is no special kindness given to him for aging. I hurt for him more than myself because I know the burden of caring for someone is hugh (I've been a caregiver for my disable sister for 7 years). Every day, my goal is simple - do as much as I can for myself and don't complain. I don't always meet my goal, but it makes me feel better to try to be as independent as possible.




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