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Zandopa (Mucana Puriens)


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#1 omalley

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 06:14 AM

I am 63, diagnosed with PD 3 years ago, still early stages, taking only Azilect, DynaCirc and Creatine. I have purchased Zandopa from India which is Mucana Puriens derived from the velvet bean. I have been trying it out at a rate of approximately 1.5 tsp twice a day. What do you know about the effectiveness of this herbal substitute for pharmacy-grade levodopa? Is a larger dose likely to be more effective? Is there any danger in taking it? I notice some mild improvement in gait with it but that could be a psychological effect. Thanks for your help.

#2 MComes RPH

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 10:05 PM

Omallay,

I know a little about this herb. The main uses are for parkinsons patients, helps to incresae libido, and increase sexual drive. Since Ldopa is a major component in the "feel good" centers of the brain, it makes sense that the others uses are available.
I will let you know that the higher the dose does not mean the greater relief of PD symptoms. The greater the dose is usually associated with incresae side effects and possible hallucinogenic activity. Below is an article about this herb that I found on healthline.com.

Cowhage (Mucuna pruriens)


Category
Herbs & Supplements


Synonyms

Dolichos pruriens, Fabaceae (family), kapikachu, kiwach, Mucuna birdwoodiana, Mucuna pruriens, Mucuna sempervirens, velvet bean.


Background
Cowhage (Mucuna pruriens) seeds have been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine to treat Parkinson's disease. This traditional use is supported by laboratory analysis that shows cowhage contains 3.6-4.2% levodopa, the same chemical used in several Parkinson's disease drugs that is a precursor to dopamine. In a few clinical trials in Parkinson's disease patients, three cowhage treatments yielded positive results. However, more research should be conducted to elucidate the treatment that is the most effective. In addition, cowhage seeds have nutritional quality comparable to soy beans and other conventional legumes, but several antinutritional/antiphysiological compounds prevent these seeds from being used as a food source.


Evidence
DISCLAIMER
: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Parkinson's disease
: Traditional Ayurvedic medicine and preliminary evidence suggests that cowhage contains 3.6-4.2% levodopa, the same chemical used in several Parkinson's disease drugs. Cowhage treatments have yielded positive results in early studies. However, more research should be conducted to determine the treatment that is the most effective.
Grade: C



Tradition
WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Anticoagulant (blood thinner), diabetes, fracture healing, hyperprolactinemia (excessive prolactin in the blood).


Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):
There is no proven effective dose for cowhage in adults. For Parkinson's disease, 15 and 30 grams of a cowhage preparation has been taken by mouth for a week. Sachets containing a derivative of cowhage, called HP-200, have also been used.

Children (younger than 18 years):
There is no proven safe or effective dose for cowhage in children.


Safety
DISCLAIMER:
Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies
Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to cowhage (Mucuna prurient) or its constituents. Hairs on cowhage flowers and pods can cause severe pruritus (itching).

Side Effects and Warnings
Few adverse effects have been reported for cowhage. In one study in Parkinson's disease patients, a derivative of Mucuna prurient caused mild adverse effects that were mainly gastrointestinal in nature. Cowhage has also caused acute toxic psychosis, which may be due to its levodopa content. Use cautiously in patients with Parkinson's disease and/or taking levodopa, dopamine, dopamine agonists, dopamine antagonists, or dopamine reuptake inhibitors as cowhage seeds contain the dopamine precursor levodopa.

Hairs on cowhage flowers and pods can cause severe pruritus (itching), and have also been used to artificially induce pruritus.

Use cautiously in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), as the levodopa in cowhage seeds may interact and cause high blood pressure.

Use cautiously in patients taking anticoagulants (blood thinners) or with diabetes or hypoglycemia, due to the potential for additive effects.

Avoid in patients with psychosis or schizophrenia, as cowhage has caused acute toxic psychosis.

Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding patients as cowhage may inhibit prolactin secretion.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Cowhage is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Two early studies indicate that cowhage may inhibit prolactin secretion.

Interactions
Interactions with Drugs

The leaves of Mucuna pruriens may dose-dependently prolong blood clotting. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs that also increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Use cautiously in patients taking diabetes medications as cowhage may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely be a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may cause high blood pressure when taken with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Caution is advised in patients with hypertension (high blood pressure) or taking medication that alters blood pressure due to possible additive effects.

In a case report, cowhage caused an outbreak of acute toxic psychosis. Caution is advised in patients with mental illnesses.

Based on a clinical study in Parkinson's disease patients, cowhage may increase serum levodopa concentrations. Caution is advised in Parkinson's disease patients taking levodopa, dopamine, dopamine agonists, dopamine antagonists, anticholinergics and antiparkinsonian agents due to possible additive effects.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements
The leaves of Mucuna pruriens may dose-dependently prolong blood clotting. Use cautiously in patients with bleeding disorders or taking other blood thinning herbs or supplements due to a possible increase in the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

In a case report, cowhage caused an outbreak of acute toxic psychosis. Use cautiously in patients with mental illnesses.

Ayahuasca (Banisteriopsis caapi) is a known MAO inhibitor; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may cause high blood pressure when taken with MAO inhibitors. Use cautiously in patients with hypertension (high blood pressure) or taking other herbs or supplements, such as ayahuasca, that alter blood pressure.

Ergot (Claviceps purpura) has known dopamine agonist activity; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which is a precursor to dopamine. Use cautiously in patients with mental illnesses, such as depression, as the combination of cowhage and ergot may result in additive effects.

Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) is a known anticholinergic; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may interact with anticholinergics. Use cautiously in patients with Parkinson's disease as the combination of cowhage and Jimson weed may result in additive effects.

Fava beans (Vicia faba) contain levodopa, as do cowhage seeds. Use cautiously with fava beans due to possible additive effects.

Cowhage may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking herbs or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.


Attribution
This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Dawn Costa, BA, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Emily Kyomitmaitee, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

Bibliography
DISCLAIMER
: Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Mucuna pruriens-associated pruritus--New Jersey. MMWR Morb.Mortal.Wkly.Rep. 12-6-1985;34(48):732-734.

Grover JK, Yadav S, Vats V. Medicinal plants of India with anti-diabetic potential. J Ethnopharmacol 2002;81(1):81-100.

Houghton PJ, Skari KP. The effect on blood clotting of some west African plants used against snakebite. J Ethnopharmacol 1994;44(2):99-108.

Infante ME, Perez AM, Simao MR, et al. Outbreak of acute toxic psychosis attributed to Mucuna pruriens. Lancet 11-3-1990;336(8723):1129.

Katzenschlager R, Evans A, Manson A, et al. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson's disease: a double blind clinical and pharmacological study. J.Neurol.Neurosurg.Psychiatry 2004;75(12):1672-1677.

Nagashayana N, Sankarankutty P, Nampoothiri MR, et al. Association of L-DOPA with recovery following Ayurveda medication in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol.Sci 6-15-2000;176(2):124-127.

No Author. An alternative medicine treatment for Parkinson's disease: results of a multicenter clinical trial. HP-200 in Parkinson's Disease Study Group. J Altern Complement Med 1995;1(3):249-255.

Prakash D, Niranjan A, Tewari SK. Some nutritional properties of the seeds of three Mucuna species. Int.J.Food Sci.Nutr. 2001;52(1):79-82.

Pugalenthi M, Vadivel V, Siddhuraju P. Alternative food/feed perspectives of an underutilized legume Mucuna pruriens var. utilis--a review. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 2005;60(4):201-218.

Rajyalakshmi P, Geervani P. Nutritive value of the foods cultivated and consumed by the tribals of south India. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 1994;46(1):53-61.

Shuttleworth D, Hill S, Marks R, et al. Relief of experimentally induced pruritus with a novel eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic agents. Br J Dermatol 1988;119(4):535-540.

Singhal B, Lalkaka J, Sankhla C. Epidemiology and treatment of Parkinson's disease in India. Parkinsonism.Relat Disord 2003;9 Suppl 2:S105-S109.

Vadivel V, Janardhanan K. Nutritional and anti-nutritional composition of velvet bean: an under-utilized food legume in south India. Int.J.Food Sci.Nutr. 2000;51(4):279-287.

Vadivel V, Janardhanan K. Nutritional and antinutritional characteristics of seven South Indian wild legumes. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 2005;60(2):69-75.

Yang HY. [L-dopa extracted from seeds of Mucuna sempervirens Hemsl as a promoter of fracture healing]. Zhong.Xi.Yi.Jie.He.Za Zhi. 1985;5(7):398-401, 386.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
Best of health,
Mark R. Comes R.Ph.
"Ask The Pharmacist"
www.parkinson.org

#3 reverett123

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 09:40 PM

Over on NeuroTalk a couple of years ago, a group of us extensively tested mucuna pruriens in the form of the raw powder as well as Zandopa. It turned into one of the longest running threads on that forum and you should read it before launching your own experiment. The following comments are drawn from that experience-
1) MP is a real drug and had best be treated with respect. I no longer take it regularly, but I have five pounds of it stored for emergencies. Since it is less than $20/lb it is practical to do so. What I do continue to use it for is as a "rescue" drug. It comes on in ten minutes, which can be handy at times. Unfortunately, it drops away just as quickly.
2) The studies which suggest doses of 15 to 30 gr are terribly wrong. I have tried as much as 55 gr and the effective dose is a tenth of that. That is correct. You need to be thinking in the five gram range. MP is what is known as biphasic in nature. A little bit will do one thing and a bit more will do something different and often the opposite of the first.
3) Zandopa is stripped of all of the compounds that make up MP. Further, I suspect that the sweetened base they refer to is aspartame. Zandopa is made by one of the largest chemical companies in India.
4) MP is far more than just Ldopa and should be researched intensively. Unfortunately, there is a problem in that a few years back, despite thousands of years of use, a patent was issued for MP in the treatment of PD. That patent was issued to a group of neurologists including the head of neurology at Mt. Sinai and who happens to be one of the most published neuros in the US. Anyone who wants to get pat these gatekeepers have to pay and the group does not have to permit anything. You can read the patent and seewhat these top docs really think about levodopa as well by goinghere.
5) If you choose to try the raw powder, I found the most convenient source was by way of Amazon.com. Banyan Pharmaceuticals offered an organic, US grown product.
6) Like many members of the "bean" family, MP can mess with your GI system with potentially serious effects due to enzyme problems. I find that simply toasting the powder in a 350 degree oven until just beginning to brown deactivates the enzymes involved.
7) MP is one of the most incredible stains you can imagine. An unnoticed bit of powder and a little moisture on a ceramic surface and you have a black stain that is almost impossible to remove. "Almost", that is, unless you pick up one of the gall-based cleaners which does the job.
8) It is a true aphrodisiac for both genders. That can be a problem in some situations, a blessing in others.

Good luck and remember, it is a real drug.

#4 reverett123

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 09:47 PM

If I may add one more thing, there is another choice in the form of a product called "Dopabean" made by Solaray. I have not tried it but I know the company to be top quality. The product is standardized and retains some of the original compounds from the MP. Again,Amazon.com has it.

#5 Dr Rajesh Nair

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 12:10 AM

Omallay,

I know a little about this herb. The main uses are for parkinsons patients, helps to incresae libido, and increase sexual drive. Since Ldopa is a major component in the "feel good" centers of the brain, it makes sense that the others uses are available.
I will let you know that the higher the dose does not mean the greater relief of PD symptoms. The greater the dose is usually associated with incresae side effects and possible hallucinogenic activity. Below is an article about this herb that I found on healthline.com.

Cowhage (Mucuna pruriens)


Category
Herbs & Supplements


Synonyms

Dolichos pruriens, Fabaceae (family), kapikachu, kiwach, Mucuna birdwoodiana, Mucuna pruriens, Mucuna sempervirens, velvet bean.


Background
Cowhage (Mucuna pruriens) seeds have been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine to treat Parkinson's disease. This traditional use is supported by laboratory analysis that shows cowhage contains 3.6-4.2% levodopa, the same chemical used in several Parkinson's disease drugs that is a precursor to dopamine. In a few clinical trials in Parkinson's disease patients, three cowhage treatments yielded positive results. However, more research should be conducted to elucidate the treatment that is the most effective. In addition, cowhage seeds have nutritional quality comparable to soy beans and other conventional legumes, but several antinutritional/antiphysiological compounds prevent these seeds from being used as a food source.


Evidence
DISCLAIMER
: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Parkinson's disease
: Traditional Ayurvedic medicine and preliminary evidence suggests that cowhage contains 3.6-4.2% levodopa, the same chemical used in several Parkinson's disease drugs. Cowhage treatments have yielded positive results in early studies. However, more research should be conducted to determine the treatment that is the most effective.
Grade: C



Tradition
WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Anticoagulant (blood thinner), diabetes, fracture healing, hyperprolactinemia (excessive prolactin in the blood).


Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):
There is no proven effective dose for cowhage in adults. For Parkinson's disease, 15 and 30 grams of a cowhage preparation has been taken by mouth for a week. Sachets containing a derivative of cowhage, called HP-200, have also been used.

Children (younger than 18 years):
There is no proven safe or effective dose for cowhage in children.


Safety
DISCLAIMER:
Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies
Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to cowhage (Mucuna prurient) or its constituents. Hairs on cowhage flowers and pods can cause severe pruritus (itching).

Side Effects and Warnings
Few adverse effects have been reported for cowhage. In one study in Parkinson's disease patients, a derivative of Mucuna prurient caused mild adverse effects that were mainly gastrointestinal in nature. Cowhage has also caused acute toxic psychosis, which may be due to its levodopa content. Use cautiously in patients with Parkinson's disease and/or taking levodopa, dopamine, dopamine agonists, dopamine antagonists, or dopamine reuptake inhibitors as cowhage seeds contain the dopamine precursor levodopa.

Hairs on cowhage flowers and pods can cause severe pruritus (itching), and have also been used to artificially induce pruritus.

Use cautiously in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), as the levodopa in cowhage seeds may interact and cause high blood pressure.

Use cautiously in patients taking anticoagulants (blood thinners) or with diabetes or hypoglycemia, due to the potential for additive effects.

Avoid in patients with psychosis or schizophrenia, as cowhage has caused acute toxic psychosis.

Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding patients as cowhage may inhibit prolactin secretion.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Cowhage is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Two early studies indicate that cowhage may inhibit prolactin secretion.

Interactions
Interactions with Drugs

The leaves of Mucuna pruriens may dose-dependently prolong blood clotting. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs that also increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Use cautiously in patients taking diabetes medications as cowhage may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely be a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may cause high blood pressure when taken with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Caution is advised in patients with hypertension (high blood pressure) or taking medication that alters blood pressure due to possible additive effects.

In a case report, cowhage caused an outbreak of acute toxic psychosis. Caution is advised in patients with mental illnesses.

Based on a clinical study in Parkinson's disease patients, cowhage may increase serum levodopa concentrations. Caution is advised in Parkinson's disease patients taking levodopa, dopamine, dopamine agonists, dopamine antagonists, anticholinergics and antiparkinsonian agents due to possible additive effects.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements
The leaves of Mucuna pruriens may dose-dependently prolong blood clotting. Use cautiously in patients with bleeding disorders or taking other blood thinning herbs or supplements due to a possible increase in the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

In a case report, cowhage caused an outbreak of acute toxic psychosis. Use cautiously in patients with mental illnesses.

Ayahuasca (Banisteriopsis caapi) is a known MAO inhibitor; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may cause high blood pressure when taken with MAO inhibitors. Use cautiously in patients with hypertension (high blood pressure) or taking other herbs or supplements, such as ayahuasca, that alter blood pressure.

Ergot (Claviceps purpura) has known dopamine agonist activity; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which is a precursor to dopamine. Use cautiously in patients with mental illnesses, such as depression, as the combination of cowhage and ergot may result in additive effects.

Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) is a known anticholinergic; cowhage seeds contain levodopa, which may interact with anticholinergics. Use cautiously in patients with Parkinson's disease as the combination of cowhage and Jimson weed may result in additive effects.

Fava beans (Vicia faba) contain levodopa, as do cowhage seeds. Use cautiously with fava beans due to possible additive effects.

Cowhage may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking herbs or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.


Attribution
This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (<!-- w -->www.naturalstandard.com<!-- w -->): Dawn Costa, BA, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Emily Kyomitmaitee, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

Bibliography
DISCLAIMER
: Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to <!-- w -->www.naturalstandard.com<!-- w -->. Selected references are listed below.

Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Mucuna pruriens-associated pruritus--New Jersey. MMWR Morb.Mortal.Wkly.Rep. 12-6-1985;34(48):732-734.

Grover JK, Yadav S, Vats V. Medicinal plants of India with anti-diabetic potential. J Ethnopharmacol 2002;81(1):81-100.

Houghton PJ, Skari KP. The effect on blood clotting of some west African plants used against snakebite. J Ethnopharmacol 1994;44(2):99-108.

Infante ME, Perez AM, Simao MR, et al. Outbreak of acute toxic psychosis attributed to Mucuna pruriens. Lancet 11-3-1990;336(8723):1129.

Katzenschlager R, Evans A, Manson A, et al. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson's disease: a double blind clinical and pharmacological study. J.Neurol.Neurosurg.Psychiatry 2004;75(12):1672-1677.

Nagashayana N, Sankarankutty P, Nampoothiri MR, et al. Association of L-DOPA with recovery following Ayurveda medication in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol.Sci 6-15-2000;176(2):124-127.

No Author. An alternative medicine treatment for Parkinson's disease: results of a multicenter clinical trial. HP-200 in Parkinson's Disease Study Group. J Altern Complement Med 1995;1(3):249-255.

Prakash D, Niranjan A, Tewari SK. Some nutritional properties of the seeds of three Mucuna species. Int.J.Food Sci.Nutr. 2001;52(1):79-82.

Pugalenthi M, Vadivel V, Siddhuraju P. Alternative food/feed perspectives of an underutilized legume Mucuna pruriens var. utilis--a review. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 2005;60(4):201-218.

Rajyalakshmi P, Geervani P. Nutritive value of the foods cultivated and consumed by the tribals of south India. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 1994;46(1):53-61.

Shuttleworth D, Hill S, Marks R, et al. Relief of experimentally induced pruritus with a novel eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic agents. Br J Dermatol 1988;119(4):535-540.

Singhal B, Lalkaka J, Sankhla C. Epidemiology and treatment of Parkinson's disease in India. Parkinsonism.Relat Disord 2003;9 Suppl 2:S105-S109.

Vadivel V, Janardhanan K. Nutritional and anti-nutritional composition of velvet bean: an under-utilized food legume in south India. Int.J.Food Sci.Nutr. 2000;51(4):279-287.

Vadivel V, Janardhanan K. Nutritional and antinutritional characteristics of seven South Indian wild legumes. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr 2005;60(2):69-75.

Yang HY. [L-dopa extracted from seeds of Mucuna sempervirens Hemsl as a promoter of fracture healing]. Zhong.Xi.Yi.Jie.He.Za Zhi. 1985;5(7):398-401, 386.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Zandopa is a herbal medicine used in India for the treatment of PD. It has been used to treat my patients and the benefits I feel are as follows.
1. Is not causing bowel irritation.
2. Not causing constipation.
3. Moods swings are controlled.
4. Tremor and muscle weakness well managed.
5. Is not causing any dependency.

#6 MComes RPH

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 10:59 AM

I agree with the dr. My only concern is that when you order this, or any medicinal product online, do you rely get what you asked for?

Buy smart and buy careful.
Best of health,
Mark R. Comes R.Ph.
"Ask The Pharmacist"
www.parkinson.org

#7 goaalfred

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 01:44 AM

I just came across this forum. I own several websites selling Zandopa and when I see posts like the one above by Mark I take offense when he says "do you rely get what you asked for?"

#8 MComes RPH

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 04:51 PM

Everyone has the right to agree or disagree with my advice. When of comes to putting a product in your body, the consumer is.ultimately the one who.has to make the sound decision based on their past and current state of physical state and medication regimen. When I say "Do you really get what you asked for?" I truly mean that. Online you can supposedly buy many prescription products without a prescription. Not legal and many times not true. You can also, online, buy tickets to go whale watching on Lake Michigan.
My point being, the consumer has to do their own research and decide if that is how they want to buy certain products. If it is a shirt or a toy, online may be fine (even if it is claimed to be Gucci but when you get it you realize it is a knockoff) when it is a consumable product that is not mandated by the FDA, I will always tell people, "Do you really know what you are buying."
I am not condemning the whole industry, just trying to open peoples eyes to what is out there. People who have an incurable disease, such as Parkinson's Disease will try almost anything to help them get better. I am one of those people, I have Parkinson's. Disease, but I am also a pharmacist who has the knowledge that many others don't. I am looking out for those people.
I appreciate your input, but I think we both agree that each consumer.should do theiir own research and make their woebegone decision on what they are purchasing is really what they are getting.
Happy holidays.

Best of health,
Mark R. Comes R.Ph.
"Ask The Pharmacist"
www.parkinson.org

#9 soccertese2010

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:55 PM

IMHO, one has to use extreme caution buying any plant derived supplement grown in india unless certified organic since they use a lot of herbicides and pesticides there, some banned in the united states. even then, the final product needs to be tested for trace pollutants. maybe they do that. i would be very worried when you can buy this stuff even on ebay.

#10 MComes RPH

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:27 PM

Sorceress, thanks for your input.
Best of health,
Mark R. Comes R.Ph.
"Ask The Pharmacist"
www.parkinson.org




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