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PD Severity and Speech and Swallowing


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#1 Dr. Mahler

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 02:39 PM

The systems that physicians use to rate the severity of the symptoms of PD give only minor consideration to speech and swallowing. This means that speech and swallowing symptoms may be present even with people described as having mild PD. Sensory changes associated with PD can make it difficult for the person with PD to have accurately assess speech and swallow function. For example, many people with PD think that their spouse needs a hearing aid because they do not know that they speak so softly that it is difficult to understand them. The severity of speech and swallowing disorders typically is more severe in later stages of the disease but don't wait until there is a problem to discuss these issues with your doctor. Early consultation with a speech-language pathologist can improve quality of life by improving understandability in functional communication as well as improve the safety and efficiency of swallowing function.

Dr. Mahler
Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP

Associate Professor

University of Rhode Island

#2 Beachdog

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 07:31 PM

Good point ... everyone I know needs a hearing aid :rolleyes: I have made a conscious effort to "talk large", especially later in the day.

Swallowing could become a problem later on I fear, once I am out of the "honeymoon" phase of PD.

Rich

#3 Dr. Mahler

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 10:27 AM

Good point ... everyone I know needs a hearing aid :rolleyes: I have made a conscious effort to "talk large", especially later in the day.

Swallowing could become a problem later on I fear, once I am out of the "honeymoon" phase of PD.

Rich


Rich,

I appreciate your efforts to monitor your speech and swallowing to identify when a problem occurs. However, there is a Catch-22 about this. It is often difficult for the person with PD to recognize when their own problem begins. Therefore, I would encourage you to seek the advice of a professional, in this case a speech-language pathologist with experience treating people with PD.

Thank you for writing. Please write again if you have any further questions.

Sincerely,
Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP
Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP

Associate Professor

University of Rhode Island




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