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Pressured Speech


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#1 Shaky Spice

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:18 PM

Hello,

I have always been a bit of a fast talker. However, I noticed sine my PD diagnosis and subsequent growing dependence on large doses of levodopa that i now have "pressured speech". So much so that my neuro and GP wanted me to undergo a psych eval for hypomania.

I teach elementary age children three days a week, and the rapid speech is starting to impact my teaching ability. Is there any sort of method or approach you would recommend or exercises in how to help slow down my mouth?

Laura
“My destination is no longer a place, rather a new way of seeing”
Marcel Proust

#2 Dr. Bassich

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 06:17 PM

Many persons with PD and on sinemet experience this symptom. Also, it sounds like you describe yourself as previously a fast talker. Some of the techniques used for persons who stutter, help persons with PD, too. If you could "remember" to slow down - talk slow and open your mouth, it might help, but it is hard to 'remember' - because you have acquired a habit of talking fast and the drug is also contributing to pressured or accelerated speech. Check out the following references in the stuttering literature, particularly those on 'cluttering.' Maybe some of these suggestions will be of help.
Myers, F. L., & St. Louis, K. O., (Eds.) (1992).Cluttering: A Clinical Perspective Leicester: FAR Communications. Reissued: San Diego, CA: Singular, 1996. (entire book freely available from the International Cluttering Association website

Bakker, Klaas (1996) Cluttering: Current scientific status and emerging research and clinical needs. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 21, 359-366.

Daly, D.A. (1993), Cluttering: Another Fluency Syndrome. In R. Curlee (ed) Stuttering and Related Disorders of Fluency, New York: Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.

Cluttering website:
http://associations....istate.edu/ICA/

A Synopsis Of Cluttering And Its Treatment by Kenneth St. Louis and Florence Myers, a paper written for the International Stuttering Awareness Day Online Conference, Oct. 1-22, 1998

St. Louis, K. O., Raphael, L. J., Myers, F. L., & Bakker, K. (2003, Nov. 18). Cluttering Updated - The ASHA Leader, pp. 4-5, 20-22.



I hope these resources are helpful to you!

Celia J. Bassich, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Faculty member, Allied Team Training for PD

#3 Shaky Spice

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 01:26 AM

I am so happy to finally have a reply and now an arsenal of resources to help. I will say that in the interim I discovered that Klonopin helps quite a bit, but I would prefer not to feel dependent on even more drugs. The references you provide...I can't thank you enough!

Laura
“My destination is no longer a place, rather a new way of seeing”
Marcel Proust

#4 Dr. Mahler

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 10:33 AM

Laura,

I'm glad that you found the resources from the previous email helpful. The drugs developed to help people with PD don't appear to have the same beneficial effects on speech and swallowing. The literature about the benefits of exercise for people with PD is growing and exercise of the muscles for speech and swallowing can improve speech characteristics.

I wish you the best,
Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP

Associate Professor

University of Rhode Island




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