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  1. 6 points
    Chronic By Superdecooper © 2010In the comfort of my dreams, I feel no pain.No heartache. No hurt coursing through this unpredictable frame of mine.I’m clear like a stream, questing for the blue ocean’s warmthBut Time, my subtle enemy, rushes me unwillingly towards the moment I awake.I struggle to smother all the small prickles of fear that the coming transition will bring.The warm comfort of my dreamscape fades.I wake into a world of tattered thoughts, unkind nerve endings and the edge of memory.Still, I hope it might be a good day.Maybe no rain in the forecast, bringing chronic pain.No mysterious body movements that spark instant regret.I fill my lungs with the sweet life of morning and hope.But then, like a death-row denizen, I exhale. Slowly I breathe out hate for the pinch of thorns shackling my release. Hot, dull, deep, unrelenting, and unforgiving pain greets me. In between each breath, I debate the sacrificial bargain awaiting my acceptance.Do I swallow each small capsule at every appointed hour?With just the right combination of rainbow tablets, I will be granted the power to bring this disaster under control.I summon the strength of will to exchange my cool intellect for a dulled, foggy existence haunted by the grey specter of pain.For just one more day, I agree to do less, think and be less.In exchange, the thorns will be blunted just enough for me to remember.When true night falls, I will dream again.
  2. 5 points
    This exercise post is near and dear to my heart. I am 55 years old and in pretty good shape. I have always been physically active. I've been involved in martial arts for years and I also enjoy going to the gym and lifting weights, among other things. I was diagnosed about 3 years ago. Even before my diagnosis I was starting to slow down on some of my activities because of excessive fatigue. I still go to the gym and my martial arts classes. I just don't try to be superwoman anymore. When I read that study that says intensive exercise will stop progression of the disease I was excited and thought "Yay! This proves what I already believed" because my progression has seemed to be slow so far. So I jumped on the bandwagon and increased my exercise. I enrolled in some classes at a local MMA school called "Fight Fit" which is basically an extremely difficult HIIT class that lasts for an entire hour. I was very proud of myself when I made it through the first class. However, this was not without a lot of increased tremors going on and literally almost no energy to get myself in the car and drive the 2 miles back home to my house. The next day I was exhausted and I felt like every last bit of dopamine had been wiped out of my body. Hmm...I thought exercise was supposed to make you better and increase your dopamine production. Where are those endorphins? I don't like to give up because like I said...I'm hardheaded, I'm a woman and I think I can be superwoman. The article says I need intensive exercise will make me better so I'm not giving up. I ended up going to 2 more classes. When it was time to go to the next class I literally cringed inside. I couldn't bring myself to go and do that to my body again. I loved the actual exercise and the comaraderie of the other women in the class. But I just felt sooo bad after the class and the next day. My symptoms actually started getting worse and then I started feeling depressed. Yes I know that I can do other exercise but I've actually been having a hard time in some of my martial arts classes lately because of an increase in tremors. I actually quit my Saturday class cause they practiced for 3 hours. I have felt like a failure because I'm now doing less exercise than I was before diagnosis. Yet everybody tells us that you must do intensive exercise. I talked to a friend who's had this disease for 25 years. She made me realize a few things about this "study" that is posted all over the internet. 1) This is not a scientific study by any means. 2) Everybody progresses at a different rate so you can't compare one person to another. 3) There's no way to determine how much somebody would have progressed in 6 months if they had not done the exercise. Seriously, there's no baseline. Six months is a very short time in the space of a lifetime. They might not have gotten worse during that time. 4) What the hell is "intensive exercise?" The study doesn't even mention how long the subjects exercised for. Obviously intensive exercise will be different for every person. So I decided I'm not going to let myself get depressed because I can no longer do "intensive exercise". I'm going to continue doing whatever I can. I'm really sick of all the people who post pictures of themselves doing bodybuilding, running marathons and similar things and trying to tell the PD community that they are not progressing because they are doing this intensive level of exercise. Maybe the truth is that their disease is progressing slowly so therefore they have the ability to continue working out like that and not the reverse. Seriously, an entire year before I ever had a tremor or other symptom of PD I suffered with extreme fatigue. At the time I was going to the gym doing a five day split, lifting very heavy (for a 110 pd woman). I was so tired in the evenings, I could barely make dinner for myself and my teenage son, then I would be crawling into the bed. My mom kept telling me to go see the doctor because that wasn't normal. Of course, I refused because I thought it was just because I had increased my weight lifting routine and I just needed to get used to it. I didn't want to quit because I had a goal. Anyway, the doctor's would have never figured out what was wrong with me even if I had gone cause I was misdiagnosed even when my tremors started manifesting. I'd like to end all this rambling to say that PWP should always keep moving and do whatever exercise they are capable of doing even if it's just walking. Yes, it will help you to feel better and probably help to keep your muscles from becoming rigid and locking up on you. However, there is no scientific evidence that it will keep you from progressing. Likewise, you are guaranteed to feel like crap if you give up and lay in the bed all day.
  3. 5 points
    Hello Debsten, One of the things I did and still do when I was diagnosed at 35 years old is to celebrate everything. The more we celebrate our every accomplishment the more dopamine our brains will produce. I celebrate getting out of the chair on the first time. I celebrate being able to drive, go to work, not having something terminal, and so on. This sounds cheesy but it does help putting you in a more positive mind set. This disease responds well to positivity and a can do attitude. Of all the people I have met and talked to, it was the ones that were positive and tried hard to stay there that do better. Exercise is also the only natural way I have seen to help this disease. I come from a back ground of treating all my ailments with naturopathic and home remedies first. With Parkinson's I have found only exercise to provide positive results for short and long term. Most MDS's you find will tell you if you feel better using said natural treatment then do it. I have and still continue with diet changes, supplements and acupuncture. Unfortunately there is little to no scientific data for natural remedies that doctors can access to say this works better than this treatment. I went from taking the occasional advil before diagnosis to taking 330 pills a month now. It is unfortunate but after 8 months of trying to fight my stiffness, tremors, and slowness of movement I could find nothing to relieve my symptoms that wasn't prescribed. Exercise helped but it did not last long enough to cover daily symptoms. Once I started with Cardopa/levodopa and azilect I found the dark cloud of doom that I had no idea was following me, had disappeared. I feel so much better now and I am still using all of the natural treatments as before. I found that once I could ease the symptoms and accept what was happing to me, my life got so much better. I can honestly say I was very happy prior to diagnosis and I am even happier now 3 years later. It is hard to explain but going through the process of getting diagnosed to acceptance changes your priorities and life goals, then you look back and realize, life is good, and in the reality of it all I could have it a lot worse. It is tough. Trust me we have all been where you are. It is ok to get angry, it is ok to cry, it is ok to scream. Just remind yourself of all that you have and still have. Soon that bright light from the future you thought you lost will start to shine again. I promise it gets better. Blessings Feel free to ask any question you might have.
  4. 5 points
    Hello BlueLion, Don't say you're sad for your young kids. For one thing you are still young and chances are you will witness new discoveries (meds) /maybe a cure ?? in your lifetime. Second, in my experience, my son (whom I had at age 40, some 6 years after diagnosis ) has grown up with a PD mom and has evolved into a very considerate person, always there to help others in difficult situations and does not seem to have been affected by his mom's disease. He will turn 25 on December 26 and is a very positive and successful young man. On April 1st last, I celebrated my 30th anniversary of diagnosis. Am still around, doing reasonably well (I had surgery in the meantime). PD is not a life sentence. You can keep an almost normal life (except for taking meds). So enjoy life and treasure every moment. Take care, Mireille
  5. 5 points
    How a person lives their life after getting a really bad diagnosis is likely to be much of how they are remembered when they are gone. I got Dementia with Lewy Bodies, so I got dementia and all the parkinson stuff. I haven't killed myself because I don't care to die and I do want to enjoy whatever my situation is the best I can, and I want my family and friends who stick around to see that there is life after getting getting hit with a hardship. Sounds corny, but that is why I haven't killed myself yet. The parkinson stuff is a real kick in the butt, but the progressive dementia stuff is quite ruinous, but between the two things there is still some light to see the day. Cheers.
  6. 4 points
    hI dIANNE, Another year slips around. Another anniversary of remembering his Life as well as his Death. I learn from you, my friend. You are a great person Dianne who has been through a lot. Where I would see a wall of dark trees hiding a murky puddle of mud, You continue to part the branches, find a forward path, the sun streams into the clearing with you (or are you the sun?) and the mud puddle becomes cute little pond of water, floating a family of little fuzzy ducks, and surrounded by flowers, green grass and forest animals coming to drink from the clear water. I hope that your weekend is good. All the best to you, jb
  7. 4 points
    You are a mom. It's probably in your DNA to worry forever. Take care.
  8. 4 points
    Pure nonsense! The top 1% of earners pay 45% of individual income taxes. The top 20% of earners pay a whopping 84% of individual income taxes. Forty five percent of Americans pay no taxes at all. How much of a tax break should people get when they pay absolutely no taxes and when many get 'money back' (earned income tax credit, for example) when they didn't pay anything in the first place? Corporations and businesses do not pay taxes. Corporations and businesses pass their taxes on to consumers. When the corporate tax rate is higher in America than other countries, corporations move off shore so that they have lower taxes to pass on to consumers and therefore lower prices giving them a competitive advantage. I don't remember you saying a word about the national debt when Obama was President. He DOUBLED the debt. Why didn't you complain about that?
  9. 4 points
    I feel so much love and support from you, dear friends. As I leave for another day at the hospital with my family I will take y'all with me. Love, Dianne
  10. 4 points
    Good Morning, “Courage does not always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, 'I will try again tomorrow.” -S
  11. 4 points
    This is a great PD site! Dr Laurie Mischley's video on nutrition is awesome! Her health care practice is the model of how health care should be.... https://scienceofparkinsons.com/2017/09/18/food/
  12. 3 points
    My husband is 70 years old. He was diagnosed about 5 years ago. He is so diligent about doing what needs to be done to stay well. Our Neurologist department has LSVT exercise three times a week. He tries faithfully to get to these exercise classes. He also went through the LSVT exercise program. THE EXERCISE MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD. He used to shuffle and he no longer does that. He seems to be having some difficulty with his speech. His voice becomes horse and he speaks quite. He has also become less of a conversationalist. His Neurologist suggested he go to speech therapy. He has gone through the LSVT LOUD program and it has helped. I would like to know why LSVT charges $45.00 for their DVD for practice. Seems as if they are taking advantage of Parkinson's patients. Just Note: He recently suffered from a bout of whatever is going around. IN MY OPINION - HE IS A GREAT GUY BUT WHEN HE GETS SICK...... HIS BODY SHUTS DOWN. HE SEEMS TO HAVE TO USE EVERY EFFORT TO FIGHT THE SICKNESS AND HE BECOMES A ZOMBIE. IT TAKES HIM LONGER TO GET OVER IT. So anyone who is suffering any flu, cold, sickness. Take note: if you have Parkinson's your extra slowness is most likely being caused because your brain is fighting the illness. Take it easy. Caregivers note: Be patient, make the Parkinson's patient take extra care of themselves. The one thing that I stress for my husband is to please make sure you put your medication in pill boxes. I only take a Blood pressure pill and thyroid medication and if I don't have those two pills in my pill box........ I don't recall if I took it this morning or not. As I say to my husband, if you are on a plane you need to put the oxygen mask on first in order to help yourself to help others. It is the one things that I insist. MAKE SURE YOU FILL THE PILL BOTTLES AND TAKE YOUR MEDICATION ON TIME. A very happy new year to you all and read and learn what helps other patients and remember. Every case of Parkinson's is different. But we can all learn from each other. God Bless
  13. 3 points
    Debsten, I lost my joy along the way too; but, can honestly say things have gotten better and not worse since my diagnosis (anxiety/stress-wise, that is). I found the medications to help "lift the cloud" quite a bit; and, I hope they do the same for you. When I'm having a down moment, I also try to think about the fact that things could be worse (i.e. I could have been given weeks to live, etc). It helps me to keep perspective. The hardest part for me was thinking about what I had expected my future to be like, and now coming to terms with the idea that it may not be like what I had thought!! But, I try to keep the faith and this has certainly opened my eyes to see how many people are suffering from chronic conditions and need my prayers. The things I used to complain about seem so trivial now... I hope this encourages you at least a little. Sending hugs...
  14. 3 points
    @ waruna01 (and apologies to Debsten for going slightly off-topic on your thread), Although I'm sure you mean well, and I'm happy for you that your self-diagnosis of PD was incorrect, I think your focus on loss of smell is misplaced. In my own case, I've been diagnosed with PD for over three years. Initial dx was by an experienced MDS, with positive DATscan last year as part of a clinical trial. I have movement symptoms that while mild, are absolutely classic presentations of early PD. And guess what? I still have my sense of smell. Having cooked professionally for a number of years, trust me--I would have noticed if it was going away. I asked my MDS about this. His response was basically a shrug: Sure, lots of people with PD lose their sense of smell, but some don't. In his opinion, there's a lot better diagnostic tools than having someone sniff a banana. This is a guy who did his MDS fellowship at a top PD research center, is currently conducting 3-4 clinical trials, and is part of a practice with (IIRC) more than a thousand PD patients. More to the point, there's all sorts of reasons a person with PD might want an early diagnosis. First, for many of us knowledge is power. Knowing what we have gives us choices about what to do about it, and how to plan for the future. For someone affected by non-moter symptoms such as anxiety or depression (and those of us with YOPD are especially vulnerable), knowing these feelings are caused by the same lack of dopamine that causes motor symptoms can be a lot more comforting than trying to figure out why mental health issues seemed to have suddenly come out of nowhere. For motor symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, and slowness, early treatment with PD meds can provide mild-to-significant relief. That can make it easier to exercise, be positive about the future, even forget from time to time that you have PD. The evidence is, because PD is progressive, whatever current level of relief a person gets from meds, that effect will always be *less* down the road. You can't hold off meds until 'things get bad' and expect meds to have the same efficacy they would have early on. PD isn't a death sentence. I'm healthy, active, work full time, and expect all that to continue for years to come. In my case, early diagnosis gives me an incentive to make sure these years count (more travel, more doing now what I had been putting off for later), and do some planning for the future that everyone should be doing regardless (e.g., saving more for retirement). Knowing the choices I have, and making choices with regard to things I *can* control, makes it easier to accept the things I can't control.
  15. 3 points
    Good Morning world., Well, it is a cool one again. We had one day this week where it actually got warmed up for a daytime high of -10 C, but every night it drops to -25 C, last nite it was -30C (-20F). i burn lots of firewoood but the gas furnace still has to make up some heat to keep the house warm enough. This is a new weather pattern in recent years where we get extended cold spells caused by the Artic cold air masses that stall over central Canada. Instead of moving on, pushed and maneuvered by the upper jet stream, it seems to stop and linger because the jet stream is not following the usual patterns . These upper winds should move this cold mass, break it up, allowing warm air to come up out of Colorado, Ohio or even the upper Pacific Ocean. Instead of this cold mass breaking up and swirling like a good old fashioned square dance with lots of wheeling, meshing and interaction with other masses and currents, we have this big old Wallflower parked on the dance floor and everything has to bend around it. When the hot air comes up your east coast it hits this big chunk of ice cold air and rain,snow and fog happen. The change in my weather is because the jet streams are not behaving as normal. And Science has persuaded me that the Jet streams are different because of Global Warming. Or maybe that is all fake news. But something is causing big changes and big storms. When people ask me what Parkinsons is like, they can often relate to my comparison to skating on an outdoor rink until you get really cold and then you take your gloves off and try to untie those laces and pull on your boots and tie up those laces almost like you were in slow motion. Then fish around in your pocket for the car keys and fumble with getting your frozen butt seatbelted securely in the car and then trying to hit the keyslot with your cold shaky hands. Most Canadians have a feeling for that description. Yesterday I went to town to pick up 1200 Levodopa pills for about $350.00, and a few other errands. I was chilled, my hands were cold and this double negative did not make a positive. I had cold Parky Paws going for my wallet, hiding in deep dark pockets, pulling gloves off and on and getting my list out and even had to fish out my cell phone and hit the right buttons cause my Mom phoned me from the Manor just to say hi. I am lucky to live in small town Canada where everybody has a name and things go a little slower. I was startled even myself how much of a job it has become to be chilled and do little things like put a credit card into its proper spot in my wallet. I was struggling to do just that in a local store one day and the checkout girl saw my struggle and reached out and easily took the card and placed it in the slot in my wallet with a smile and casual conversation that I was grateful for and it seemed so nice of her with no hint of trouble for her and I certainly had no indignation about her touching my wallet. There is more that I wanted to say this morning but there are things to get done. Like feed the horses. They see the light on in the kitchen and they like to whinny their hay demands over the fence at me. They will have frost on their whiskers this morning. Take care everyone, don't forget your sunscreen today Miracleseeker lol. jb.
  16. 3 points
    This tip is for those who are caregivers of someone bedridden, who sits a lot, or who spends a lot of time in a wheelchair and is at risk for bedsores or pressure sores. After DH was bedridden for a while, he developed a serious pressure sore on his tailbone. I was naive about the risk and thought hospice was covering all bases, but not. He cannot lie on his back and has to be regularly rotated from one side to the other. Because he is so thin, his hip bones are very prominent and soon red spots began to appear there indicating the beginning of pressure sores. I searched for a solution. I am a quilter and my favorite batting is Hobbs wool. I had a bag of leftover cuttings. Wool is resilient. It does not mat down. I had been using a sheepskin all along, but it didn’t prevent the tailbone pressure sore. The batting is spongy and I can use as many layers as I want for cushioning. We still rotate him regularly, but always with layers of wool batting under his hipbones. He has developed no bedsores there and the tailbone bedsore is healing miraculously when the hospice nurses told me it would not heal and would only get worse. The nurses are amazed and are now recommending the batting to other patients at risk for pressure sores. It is an effective, easy and relatively inexpensive solution for a difficult problem. I hope this information is of help to someone else.
  17. 3 points
    I just had my second programming after a year of DBS in- DBS out - DBS back in. I found out that Entacapone was giving me trouble afterwards. as far as my mental health goes. I am totally off that medication and down to half the CL and Amantadine and I have more energy (recently). So far, it has been worth it. I am typing easier too!
  18. 3 points
    Saw my MDS yesterday, along with the Speech Therapist. I wasn't supposed to see her again until mid-January, but I've been having problems with being dizzy when standing, been having a hard time sleeping sometimes, and meds have been wearing off and less effective overall. Plus, following my neuropsych eval back in April she had said at my July meeting that she wanted me to see the speech therapy folks due to the issues with word finding. Overall, not terribly eventful, but I did get my Rytary increased from 3x3 to 3x4 per day. I had been taking them at 8/2/8 so a six hour interval. I'll now be taking them, I think, at 7/11/4/9 which will give me a 4 hour interval during the work day, but I'll stretch it to 5 hours in the evening. We will see how that works out. For breakfast it might actually work out better. I seldom eat at home before going to work, so taking it at 7AM will mean that by the time I'm getting peckish at work I'll be at a good time to eat. Plus, the 8AM timing was tough on Wednesdays since I a standing teleconference with the India team from 7:30-8:30, and I'm usually in my boss's office for that call (boss and an India team rep in the office too), which means I either take meds 30 minutes early or late those days. This should avoid that issue. I think 11AM won't interfere too much with lunch since I can just wait until noon to eat, which I do anyway probably at least 3 days a week. Meds at 4PM likewise should be no problem with food since I rarely eat dinner before 6PM, and by 5PM I'd be good to go. The 9PM one might occasionally be a problem, as sometimes we don't eat until 7-8PM or so. But that will still be better than the 8PM med time from before since if we ate anytime before 7:30 I'll be OK. For dizziness she wants me to work more on hydration, including adding more electrolytes. We'll see if that cures it. Hope so. For difficulty sleeping she was recommending Sleepytime Tea, or chamomile tea/herbal supplements, and/or melatonin. She also thought the additional Rytary would help. Thankfully she was in agreement that anything stronger was uncalled for. The speech therapist had me do some additional tests for word finding. One of the things she had was a book with pictures and I had to name the object. Started off great, then got to some that I really struggled with. The harmonica, beaver, paint, and couple others I'm not recalling I really stumbled over. The picture of the paint board I could never come up with the name until she flipped it over. Then she had me do the "every word (not proper nouns or different forms of the same base word) starting with the letter S" in one minute. Struggled with that about like in the neuropsych eval. Got some exercises from the speech therapist to try to help out with that. As I mentioned in a DBS thread, I stated that I assumed at this point we were still several years away from even beginning to discuss DBS. She agreed with that, and said that even if I was getting close to that point, which I'm not since the meds are working well and I don't have any dyskinesias yet, that she would recommend waiting if possible for another 2-5 years. There are a ton of advancements coming down the pike for DBS that will make it less invasive and better overall. Currently battery packs and controllers are implanted in the chest or abdomen in operations that, at least in the USA, are typically done under general anesthesia. Average life for the battery packs is 5 years, so if you have DBS done at, say, 45, you're looking at an expectation of 9 total battery packs if you live to 90, so the initial pack plus 8 replacements. Some will need more, some less depending on a lot of variables. But even you only need 5, that's still a lot of surgeries to replace it. One advancement she said is in development is a battery that can be placed under the scalp, and it sounded like it was intended to last substantially longer, possibly long enough to never need replacement in your lifetime. Plus, with now I think 3 companies with FDA approval for DBS systems (IIRC they're Medtronic, Boston Scientific, and St Jude) they are all working on improving leads, lead placements, control systems, programming, and so on. We are likely in an inflection point for advances in DBS such that waiting, if tolerable, is likely the best plan. Eventually things will taper off in terms the rate of advancements. I'm hoping that we'll be in that phase of the development curve by the time I am ready to seriously consider DBS.
  19. 3 points
    I honestly feel like the words of my dad, "Oh get up, i've had worse than that in my eyeball" coupled up with the "Soldier Up" mental conditioning of US Military service. Along with my grandpa always saying "Doctors bury their mistakes", (no offense intended). Helped me to go another five years after knowing something was not just right. My military training in the heavy equipment mechanic field taught me that little quirky issues will either work themselves out or get worse. Then the first doctor appointment came along with a couple of medicines taken with blind faith, which I will never do again. Then four months of every doctor saying ALS, to walking out of the Dallas VAMC with C/L on the day I was supposed to be confirmed with ALS and referred to the ALS CLINIC. My philosophy of the huge algorithms of life with PD management is. No matter how good or bad today is it could be worse, and most likely a day will come when you will be glad today was not as bad as your best day will be. Life is what you make of it, you are in charge and regardless of what works for someone else, the thing that matters the most is what works for you. The choice is yours to make.
  20. 3 points
    It was so nice to read posts with opposing views that were well thought out and respectful. My big thing with hunting is that it be done humanely. There are different qualities of hunters out there and not all are of your high quality Stump. I would like to recommend a book that some of you may like. It's Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat by Hal Herzog. It's about why its so hard to think straight about animals. It's been a few years since I've read it but I found it an interesting read. With that said, I would vote for a separate thread labeled Hunting also as even though I eat meat, I do find it disconcerting to read or hear about a kill. Thank you Stump for your well thought out response. I can't kill an animal but because I do consume some meat I'm glad someone can. Temple Grandin has a book out called Animals Make Us Human. She understands animals and works for their welfare and has made huge advancements in the slaughter industry. She's a prime example of one who loves animals and advocates for their humane treatment by educating and implementing improved conditions in slaughter houses by reducing the fear and stress factors for the animals. It's also a truly good read even for those strongly opposed to the killing of animals. It really is possible to love them and eat them as odd as that sounds.
  21. 3 points
    Stump started this thread discussing fishing, kayaking, and hunting. Here's a thought! How about at the first inkling that you see something you don't like, stop reading and move on to the next post. What is wrong with people in today's society that thinks that everyone else should change to suit them? People post stuff online every day that I don't agree with. If I don't like it, I don't read it. Stump, keep on posting. I don't hunt much anymore, but I love eating game that my sister and niece bring home. They both got 8 point whitetails this weekend.
  22. 3 points
    I visited my son for his 21st birthday!!! so blessed with my boys!! LAD
  23. 3 points
    One of my latest music videos. Probably better to listen to than watch, since it doesn't show a lot. I tend to get stressed with a camera pointed at my face, versus pointed at my hands
  24. 3 points
    I used to read this forum religiously, but stopped because this running debate over TUDCA had become over the top tedious. I just tuned back in assuming everyone had finally gotten bored repeating themselves and moved on, but not so. The simplest concept and most obvious observation that every person on every Parkinson’s forum immediately figures out is that some drugs and supplements work for some people and not others. Is that really so hard? If a particular drug or supplement does not work for you, the only intelligent thing you can say about it is that it does not work for you. It is fundamentally ignorant to argue a supplement doesn’t work because it doesn’t work for you. The TUDCA skeptics, for example, have written many posts telling us what has worked for them, yet I don’t see anyone questioning the veracity of their comments. Everyone who reads their posts has the class to take them at face value, yet for the better part of four years now and the better part of 47 pages, they have disparaged Mr. Fritz insisting that TUDCA does not work - even though there are others who say it does. The only conclusion one can draw is that they are not so much interested in teaching and learning, that is, helping other PWP as they prefer being argumentative. “What does TUDCA do?” It helps some people with Parkinson’s disease. Is that simple enough? I believe Mr. Fritz must enjoy this endless back-and-forth as much as the naysayers do, otherwise he would’ve quit responding long time ago. Get a life, people. See you next year.
  25. 3 points
    Super, At first, it is overwhelming to say the least. You need to go through the grieving process leading to acceptance. Once in the acceptance place, you will encounter new symptoms that will force you to go through the process again. We can only find peace in the acceptance mode. Living in denial, anger, depression or compromise is more difficult. I deal with PD by 1. keeping a positive attitude, 2. looking for the right medication cocktail, 3. exercising, 4. resting, 5. eliminating stress, 6. staying warm. Having PD is like a new life you have not chosen. Forget the old one, or at least detach from it otherwise nostalgia will lead to frustration. Try not to look too far in the future as this will lead to anxiety, causing stress which will exacerbate symptoms. Be grateful for the positive aspects present in your new life. It is a marathon, save energy, don't rush. Be systematic and analytical. You will become the PD expert for yourself. Don't compare too much to others as we are all affected differently and progression is different for all. The future has too many unknowns, stay in the present as much as possible.
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