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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/21/2017 in Posts

  1. 6 points
    Hello all, It's been a while since I've posted. This coming Monday, I start the inpatient segment of a Phase 1 double blind clinical trial, testing a new immunotherapy treatment for PD. Details of the trial are here: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02459886 The trial is fairly invasive, including IV administration of the study drug (or placebo), five days of inpatient stay with 24 hour monitoring, multiple lumbar punctures (spinal taps), and MRIs. To qualify, I've had to drop all meds except Azilect (people on stable doses of Sinemet also qualify, I believe), and undergo a series of health screens, including DaTScan. Reasonably good health (apart from PD) and a positive DaTScan are required. Since most Phase 1 trials don't pan out, and I have a 1/3 chance of getting the placebo, I'm not expecting personal benefit. But the science is very cool--the hope is the compound (engineered antibodies) will clear misfolded alpha-synuclien proteins from the brain and dramatically slow PD progression. Immunotherapy treatments from other companies have already made it past Phase 1, and are starting Phase 2, so even if this particular trial doesn't produce good results, it seems the general approach has a lot of promise. My MDS is one of the study doctors, so I feel like I'm in good hands, and compensation for my time and travel is quite reasonable. Certainly there are risks involved, but I believe they are relatively small and manageable. I'll post more as the experience continues.
  2. 6 points
    Mplsgrl86, I can relate, our four children were 3,5,7, and 9 when this started and it was diagnosed almost three years later. my first reaction was grief for the first week. My DW was a Pollyanna and wouldn't let it get her down. The problem was she would only look at the good things and let everything else go so there was no line of communication between us. That has continued until lately and it still isn't completely open. Getting on the same page with your husband to me is the most important thing going forward. Get all of the crap stuff out of the way so you won't have to worry about things later. I have had to do all of the financial planning, and lately got her to do some estate planning. I would get your wills in order, medical power of attorney, durable power of attorney, living wills and things our of the way. That way you don't have to make decisions when you are possibly really stressed later and can think things through. Having a child makes one aware of, who will be the guardian, how will they be taken care of, etc. more apparent. I can't believe how many people that don't have medical problems do not have a will in place. One big piece of advice from a dear departed friend, was that if you have seen one person with Parkinson's you have seen one person with Parkinson's. I think the people that face a lot of problems tend to post here, people that don't have to deal with much don't since they don't feel the need. Don't let the posts on here worry you too much, you can't predict how long this journey will be, what symptoms will show up, how fast it will progress, etc. Make your plan for the future and adjust it as life comes. I think that can ease your mind a lot. Message me or others if you have questions you do not want the public to see, people are really helpful on here. Coach T
  3. 6 points
    this a few days ago and lost it three times. It just reappeared today. It's a beautiful day in my neighborhood, too. Mister Rogers was my daughter Lillian's favorite program when she was young. I love your description of the magic of gardens growing, jb. As part of a workshop that I attended 30 years ago, I was asked to fold a large piece of white paper into thirds and draw a picture of my past, present, and future on each of the panels. I drew my past showing a very hard-shelled seed with all the colors of the rainbow inside it under snow covered ground, surrounded by creepy insects. The present showed a small sapling with a few branches and leaves. I depicted my future as a full grown tree with flowers of many colors. It has all come true. From a frightened child in a hostile environment to a small but earnest sapling, to a mature tree in full and glorious bloom, I have and will continue to realize my full potential. This has come about not in spite of PD but because having PD has forced me to nurture myself or be miserable.
  4. 6 points
    We had our annual Golden Retriever Rescue group swim this weekend. Storms held off, but 110 Golden Retrievers and 117 people it was a great turn out. We took the harness off my Golden, who is my Service Dog, and told her to go play! She was swimming almost non-stop. Few hundred tennis balls, but she would get a sandy one and come up to the ball bucket and drop it in and get a new one!
  5. 6 points
    Everything in life involves trade offs. Meds for PD are no exception. Ive been taking carbidopa/levodopa since my Dx 19 months ago. Only side effect since then was daytime sleepiness. So I switched from the regular instant release (often called Sinemet) to an extended release version (Rytary). Same medication, just different rate of release. I feel like I did 5 years ago as a result. However I know that the trade off is a high probability of dyskenisia (bad movements) at some point in the future. However, the latest research shows that you probably aren't saving yourself much if anything by delaying those meds. It is the total dose of levodopa that causes that side effect more so than duration of taking it. There are other meds you can try too. Primarily the dopamine agonists like Requip and Mirapex. However those have their own risks, including impulse control disorders, and sleep attacks (suddenly falling asleep when that is inappropriate like while at work or driving). Some on here choose to not medicate at first. For them exercise is a key part of fighting the disease, as it really should be even if you are taking meds. It will boil down to whether the symptoms are more bothersome for you than the risks of the side effects. But the meds are not something to fear, just something to consider with deliberation.
  6. 5 points
    Good morning...nothing better then a sunset at the beach! Have a good day everyone ! ps...jb... The "boy" I taught to tango was my fellow Parkinson wellness recovery classmate...I have two of them and they are 70+ years old but we call them the "boys" LAD
  7. 5 points
    Wow Luke you are very upset. I support Miracle because of the ongoing support she has given me through the years, I won't apologize for that. I don't think pitting people against each other in your dis take with Miracle is appropriate. I will support you as quickly when it's earned. We all need to understand that we're all at different stages, different head spaces and different approaches on this insidious decease. Chill out. We need all our energy to battle Parkinson's not each other. D
  8. 5 points
    1) Explain parkinsonism vs Parkinson's. What symptoms do I have (or don't have) that make it different? 2) Could it be MS, since lesions show on the MRI? 3) What is typical for progression? What symptoms come first, and what can I expect going forward? 4) What are the obvious symptoms, and what are the non-motor symptoms? (i.e. depression, apathy, confusion...) 5) There is evidence that some people may exaggerate symptoms subconsciously. Make a list of symptoms you can't fake, in case they decide to dismiss your initial diagnosis, and discuss them in detail. They call it "giveaway" on some motor and strength tests. I had a neurologist (non-MDS) say early on that I had giveaway. I had to look it up after I saw the post-appointment notes. You obviously don't want PD, but the mind is a crazy thing if you're convinced you have PD... In hindsight, I wish I could have asked him whether my confirmed sleep apnea and REM Behavior Disorder were fake. Or if I intentionally wet the bed with my incontinence. MDS's are smart and they should be trained to see the differences. No need to exaggerate, just be yourself... Good luck to you! ,
  9. 5 points
    Good Morning, I hope that everyone had a good weekend, a good nites sleep and has ideas for a good week . Yesterday, my Mom came out to the Farm from the retirement Manor for Mothers day. She is 88, needs to use her walker, but is ready to go anywheres. I have 3 brothers and 2 sisters with spouses and kids,and some grandkids that were coming for lunch. Some of my cousins that live nearby came as well. Everyone brought salads and butter tarts, cheese cake and the usual assortment of summertime food. I cooked some pork loin roasts for sandwiches the night before. I still had lots to do to get ready for the 25 plus people coming for lunch when I got up Sunday morning. Vacuuming, clean the bathrooms, get myself cleaned up, put the extra leaves in the dining table, slice the meat and all that stuff. I used to be able to fly through a list of those things. A 5 minute shower use to take me only 3 minutes. I could vacuum with one hand and dust the cabinets with the other. Unload the dishwasher, and fill pickles dishes at the same time. But not now. I realized that dragging that unwelcome, leeching companion named Parkinson that has been riding my back for the last 10 years is causing me trouble. He is getting heavier, my back gets sore, my arms sometimes feel like lead, My feet drag across the floor like I was wading through waist high molasses. I was up at 7:00 to finish preparing, People would be arriving at high noon. I said to myself, "Self, just relax. What gets done, gets done. It is just family, the food will get served, Everything will be fine" I was running the vacuuum with short pushes and pulls, one eye on the clock, and tottering around, wondering if I really took pills this morning when my Sister from next door came in. An angel to my rescue at about 10:30. She, I often call her St. Susie, soon had me on track to finish things needing to be done. Instead of skittering from job to job with no accomplishment. She took quick and efficient steps as she always could, and soon had the kitchen stuff organised, table set and we were ready when people started to arrive. I swear, she could organise violent rioters in the street into a Sunday School Picnic. I think everyone had a good day, Everyone got filled up with yummy food. There was still a dozen people stayed for supper of leftovers and a big feed of asparagus which quickly disappeared. I even had leftover cheescake for breakfast today. Yesterday reinforced two things that I already knew: One being that my parkinsons symptoms are more pronounced and stress makes them worse to the point of freezing up. The faster I go, the slower I am. And second, but first, I am lucky to have grown up and lived with my own family within a bigger family that has always been close and supportive of each other. I hope everyone has a good day today and can pull some contentment out of this trainride called Life: with its delays, detours, unmarked stations, speeding downhill runaways clinging onto tight bends, dark tunnels, high trestle bridges over vast gorges, and slowly chugging uphill tracks. But always with new views and outlooks, challenges and rewards: travelling this railroad, knowing where you have been, wondering whats around the next bend. jb
  10. 5 points
    The rocket thundered on takeoff from ``other places``, or was it Outer Spaces, picked up shuttles that clicked onto our Rocket from other galaxies, skimmed through Milky Ways, Black Holes and Time Warps. The online show was a new sitcom produced by a Miss Feisty Folder and proved very interesting. The flight was ``Out of this`World``. Pun intended. Very modern it was, But with very little ceremony they prepared me for exit and my return Home and I was ejected out of the Air Canada Rocket by an older than me gentleman, a former WW 2 Air Force Crewman, a bomb aimer I believe he may of been, who calculated wind drift, our Mach 7 ground speed my weight and the heftiness of my carry on luggage that I clutched,(hoping he wouldn`t discover my Trail Mix raisins and peanuts from some other stratosphere), and pushed me out the Arriving Somewhere Rocket Exit Tube as we passed over Kilkenny on the next orbit of the earth. I fell, the chutes opened, I drifted, I saw land, I saw ocean, flooded rivers and cars and cows and people and landed in my backyard. The horse knickered for a bale of hay and the dog needed out to pee. It was nice to get home.
  11. 5 points
    Had a PD -0 ...ME - 1 moment today hiked a trail to incredible lookout today!
  12. 4 points
    Without any attempt to start a thread I post a periodic Bible verse that may be the source of some strength, comfort, or inspiration to my fellow "Parkies" in the best or worst of times as we deal with our challenges. Feel free to add a verse if you wish for those so inclined on this topic. It would be helpful if you mention what bible translation your verse is from if you do post. Have a great week. Romans 8:35-39 (KJV) Paul to the church at Rome Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are counted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.
  13. 4 points
    Welcome. I am 46 and I probably started with my significant problems at about 40, probably some minor ones before that. I am glad you found it so early and have time to plan while he can take on diet and exercise. I was un-medicated until I turned 44 and I did ok, but was relieved to find answer by then because things were getting difficult. So, now I am on meds and doing ok. I have 4 kids, and they have managed pretty well with it also. It really affects the whole family in some ways, but everyone understands. So, I know I will be managing ok for a few years on medicine alone because I haven't been on C/L until late 2015. I also started on Neupro; which was great until I had problems with side effects. I was doing it for the same reason you are concerned about. I am now looking at DBS as an option to hopefully reduce the medications and have another tool to fight the natural progression. Even without it, I am able to get on my bike and take short trips with the kids. Things are better for us than they were before, so we have we don't see it as despair, but a chance to do more together than I originally thought possible. You will find there are many options available for him and the path is not as grim as it may seem today.
  14. 4 points
    As a 45 year old mom of 3 boys and a YOPD....I understand your fears. It's incredibly overwhelming and there is a whole process of emotions but your family will be ok. It may not seem like it right at this moment, but eventually PD becomes part of your life. You can't control the fact that it has become part of your life, but you can control how you respond to it. It is not all sunshine and roses but it's not gloom and doom either. Exercise is key. A PD specific one is beneficial. There are lots of programs...educate yourselves and pick one that works. When I was DX, one doctor recommended dancing. My husband and I now take ballroom dance lessons. We even go to formals now...gown & tux. Never in a million years would I had guessed we would ever take dance lessons. As much as I feared things PD would take from us, I never thought it would bring us something but it did. And when we are busting a move in the living room, I forget I have PD. My kids are older than yours but I think they are more aware that anyone may be fighting a battle that you cannot see and they have definitely learned what it means to be married and love unconditionally. PD was not in the plan. Life will be different but it can still be great. PD does not define me, it's a part of who I am now. I have learned to be present - seize the day. Eat ice cream for breakfast with your toddler. I just listened to a webinar on the Michael J Fox foundation. It was about YOPD. It was very informative but not overwhelming. You can find it on their website under webinars. Good luck and welcome to the forum. LAD
  15. 4 points
    Some one explained exercise like this to me and it help me keep up the motivation. (I have almost the same issues you do during and after exercise). "Doing an exercise routine that gets the heart rate up for 1/2 hour or more is like making a deposit in your 401K. It is not immediately beneficial but will help you in the future." This helped me to understand that I may not see a benefit that day, but I will see it in the future. I can say that after 2 years of maintaining an active life with exercise, I am still on the same dose we first found worked for me and my last MDS visit I had the same scores I did when I first saw them. Good luck and hang in there. It does get better. Attitude is everything with this disease. Every day try and find something to celebrate (be happy abut). It can be as simple as waking up in the morning and putting you slippers on with out meds. This way of celebrating the little thing helps me stay in a positive mind set each day. Blessings Adam
  16. 4 points
    Great thread! Thanks for starting it. I know the following is referring to possessions but it still makes me stop and think before fretting over the everyday stuff---including my future with PD. Its been posted on my refrigerator long before my diagnoses.
  17. 4 points
    loveya1971, The first thing to do is take a deep breath. Absolutely nothing has changed simply because you were diagnosed with PD. You are no worse off the day after you were diagnosed than you were before being diagnosed. Were you crying and feeling lost in the months and years before being diagnosed? The latest thinking is that people likely have PD for 20 years before being diagnosed. You've likely had PD for 2 decades and didn't even know it. Nothing has changed, you still have PD. Next, realize that you can and should get BETTER! That's right, better! Now that you know you have PD, you can start treatment. No, I'm not talking about taking any of the dangerous PD drugs that are often worse than the disease itself. I'm talking about EXERCISE, which is the only thing shown to slow the progression of PD. Furthermore, starting a PD exercise program should improve your symptoms and help you to feel better than you have in years. When I was first diagnosed with PD, I walked like a 90 year old man. I had to hold both rails to walk down the stairs in the morning. Daily exercise fixed that. I now walk a MINIMUM of 12,000 steps a day (about 5 1/2 miles) and usually walk a lot more than that. Last week, I had two days that I hit 30,000 steps. When you are diagnosed with PD, you have a choice. You can sit in the corner and cry; go get a handicap sticker; buy a walker; and decide that your life is over. OR, you can decide to take your life in your own hands and fight!!! You can start a PD exercise program; eat healthy; maintain a positive attitude; and live your life normally. The choice is YOURS!
  18. 4 points
    Advice? Have as much fun while you can, and don't fret. Key thought? "You will NEVER feel better than you do today"....so, anything you want to do: travel, sports, work, love, etc, do now. Yeah, maybe they will cure it in 10 years. We can all hope. But in the mean time, live for today. I am having more fun NOW than I did 20 years ago. I am a little worse today, than this time last year. And last year I was a little worse than the year before. Don't let time sneak past you. Go out and have fun.
  19. 4 points
    Good Morning Everyone, And special good morning to Ella. Pretty quiet on the board today isn't it. Maybe everyone had too many hotdogs on Memorial Day. Good Advice you gave me yesterday Ella. I decided what the heck as I got out of bed this morning and began "The Trudging" around the house for the regular eye opening, muscle stretching, bladder relieving, TV tuning, pill popping, cereal slurping, coffee making, bread toasting, followed by laptop reading and then the dog is on my lap for some sports report watching and then we maybe even do a little bit of eye shut napping. That is the usual routine. Back to your advice, I don't have to follow the old routine, I can make my own decisions. I have no boss, so today, I went crazy and instead of oatmeal porridge I went to my cookie jar and grabbed 2 chocolate chip, and 3 Oatmeal with chocolate chips, raisins and coconut cookies and they tasted good. I don't usually eat cookies before breakfast, but today I am a Rebel. Have a great day Ella, and Everyone else too. jb
  20. 4 points
    Be afraid, very afraid . . . la-fi-hiltzik-trump-disabled-20170522-story.html Hope NPF and others come out with strong positions on this one. SS Disability is a benefit we pay for through our payroll taxes and a lifesaver for many with Parkinson's disease and other debilitating conditions. "Disability insurance is an inextricable part of Social Security. It’s a core part of the program, just like retirement benefits. It was created as an add-on to Social Security in 1956, under President Eisenhower. It’s financed by the payroll tax, and the reserve funds that cover both aspects of the program are more entwined than ever, thanks to a reform measure passed by Congress in 2015."
  21. 4 points
    Actually, a pretty good post, IMO. I could have written it myself. I was extremely angered when my wife kept mentioning how her social life has been ruined by my lack of interest in what we used to enjoy together. I didn't ask for the change in out social priorities, and I certainly don't like it; but I considered it a guilt trip on her part. Was I being selfish? Maybe, but marriage is a two-way street. I need to understand her concerns; but she needs to understand that my mind is now different than before. I'm actually appalled by some of the responses here. I don't think you're a moron, and I don't think that you have to be "nicer to her" so she doesn't bail on you. You are reacting to negative cues like any other normal person would. Talk it out; do research together; and find common ground, if possible. If she doesn't attend all of your Dr appointments; bring her along and talk to the Doc! I think my wife and I finally worked through it, but it took a while. Hopefully, you can as well Thanks for posting!
  22. 4 points
    Bluemoon, Welcome. I was diagnosed at age 35 almost 3 years ago. I understand how you feel and what you thoughts are. I took me a good year before I could honestly say that I had accepted what was happening to me. Now 2.5 years later I am happier now than I have ever been. The biggest thing is don't stop anything until you have had a chance to work with your new reality for awhile. Just because you finally have a label for the problems you have been noticing does not change the fact you have been coping with those problems for many months or even years before now. This disease is slow progressing. Trust me you have time to processes and change you mind set before you make any quick decisions. For now maintain a healthy diet, keep you fiber up so you can keep your bowl regular. Keep active and exercise when ever possible. It helps and make a big difference. Don't let the PD monster kill your entire future. It is still your future. It just might not be the way we thought it would be. Take time, reflect on where you have been and where you want to be. You will still get there. For me researching treatment and getting to know this disease intimately has really helped me decide when and what meds I want to take. There will be hurdles. Just like your past there were hurdles you had to overcome. Some tougher than others. Celebrate those accomplishments daily. Every morning I wake up and my legs are stiff, my feet are hurting and my head wants to pull down to my right shoulder. I slowly stretch, slip on my clothes, hobble down the stairs and let the dog out. As the dog is doing her business I take a moment and celibate the fact that I did all that without taking my first dose of meds. Every time I do something that takes a lot of fine motor skill and concentration I celebrate that I was able to do it. It sound cheesy but the more moments you can find to be happy the happier you will be. Feel free to contact me if you need anything Sorry you had to join our club but glad you found us. Blessings Adam
  23. 4 points
    That always has seemed to be the problem: we live in a world where half the people think the only way to get what they want—they call this the common good-- is to use the force of Government to extort compliance from the other half who view their solutions and tactics as counterproductive and an attack on personal freedoms. It amazes me how your Democratic party can claim moral righteousness on so many issues and at the same time deny the humanity of half the American people. Yes, it’s shameful for a country not to take care of the truly needy but it’s immoral not to distinguish those who can’t take care of themselves from those who won’t. Adding insult, your “Party’s” continual belittling and demonization of anyone who opposes them. Your characterization of our leadership as being chaotic and lead by “whim” simply demonstrates your unwillingness or incapability to understand what they are doing. If your “party” truly wants things to change for the better, they need to entertain the idea that the old way of doing things is only going to result in more of the same old results and that introducing meaningful change, although uncomfortable is only part of the growing process. What world would you rather have your children inherit: one dominated by convoluted Government regulations designed to benefit big corporations, bureaucrats, and special interests or one of self-determination where citizens willfully look after the welfare of each other? I personally think that many Democrats are acting out of self-interest or have so little faith in the humanity of their fellow Americans that they prefer the iron fist over willful cooperation. Where does it end—you did say “healthcare is just one of our struggles”—if forced to comply with the whim of my neighbor at what point is he my Master? Vote no on intrusive Government control.
  24. 4 points
    And Good morning tonite. Hope everyone is having a good week. Rather, had a good week. This is Friday morning isn't it. I just wanted to catch up on some replies and comments. The Count..I like your sign in name. Were you a big fan of the Muppets per chance? Azilect......I was on it. Very e$pen$ive and didn't seem to do much for me. But drugs work different for different people. Good Luck with it. And I am more emotional now than I was. Parkinsons, drugs, older, I don't know. Lad., you like slogans and such. A long time ago, we had a thread about what we would put on T shirts for Parkys . I wonder if I could find it again. You like to go hiking. When you stood on top of that mountain, did you sing the Rocky theme song to yourself? Twitchy M and Linda, sometimes when I run into someone in town and they say , oh you are looking pretty good (healthy they mean), I think to myself yeah, but you should of seen me before I felt good enough to drive in here. And like a CinderFella, there is a time constraint and I better be home before these damn pills wear off. Hi Serenity. Feel free to post on this thread whenever you want to. Feisty Folder, your evolving television production is very interesting. Tom, I'm glad that you are not getting washed away with the storms in Texas that we hear about and see on the news at night. And that is a lot of dogs. Do they all get along with each other? Hi #57 from Wisconsin. Dianne, I am glad to see you on the board. I hope you are feeling more comfy. FF, you have a sweet and Tender relationship with your Mom I am thinking. TM, you will love BC. Right Bard? And EM, I think I saw you talking to your neighbour and I did wave to you and tossed a litre of syrup to you. I think it landed in Ireland. Hmm. Wonder if Lucy picked it up... Ella, its the price of gas and the low Canadian dollar that restricts me from the USA food truck market. That and the protective trade barriers and pancake protectionists and syrup sanctions and subsidies. Its a real waffle war going on there. And Dianne again, hope you win your battles with pain, doctors, landlords and government. And then, the hour getting late, I selected a sleeping pod that was designed to look like an old stage coach of the west. I set the timer for 6 hours and climbed up into it and pulled the door shut. Photo strips of the Wild West played on the wall to create the illusion that I was actually moving. Or was I really? The mini bar was actually a mini Walgreens and there was a full selection of Parky medications. I decided on a couple Mellow Yellow Levadopas and washed them down with a drink from a bottle that said Rotgut Whiskey but I knew it was really just orange juice. I adjusted the sound track of a six horse team galloping down a rocky road with a teamster whistling out to them and geeing and hawing on the reins that made slapping sounds over the rhythm of 24 steel horse shoes striking the flinty road while another voice, that would of belonged to the guy who would be riding shotgun, sung "Get Along Little Doggies". I settled in for a nice sleep on the horse hair cushioned bench. It had a massage feature so I thought what the heck and pushed in a couple coins and set the movement for "Realistic Stage Coach Ride" but then reduced it back to the "Let the Horses Walk While I Sleep" setting after falling out of the bed to the floor a couple times and getting my Roy Rogers pyjamas all dusty. I ended up sleeping good, but I awoke in some place called Abilene when the timer went off and I don't even know where that is. Now what?
  25. 4 points
    The point of the exercise isn't to address the current symptoms (and in fact for most of us the exercise is be difficult and can exacerbate current symptoms). The stiffness I felt after a work 3 years ago is no where near how stiff and achy hurt I feel after I work out today. My tremor goes crazy while I work out, and the fatigue hits like a brick shortly after too. BUT, the physical act of exercising actually has the therapeutic benefit of resisting neurodegenerative diseases. When you work out hard, to the point of actually tiring yourself out, there can actually be measurable increases in dopamine in the stiatum. Regularly working out, even moderately, has been prove as one of the more effective ways to enhance the plasticity of the central nervous system. That means it it makes your brain better able to adapt and resist the effects of PD. This isn't sales pitch type stuff from an infomercial on late night TV, its scientifically documented fact. So, yes it sucks. It can hurt, and I'd agree that it can even cause symptoms to flare up. But, if that means my current symptoms flare and I slow down the progression of new ones, I'm all for it.
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