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WBV

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  1. To answer the question as to why conventional exercise can't do the same? I will answer this in simple terms! (also i have posted 2 clinical studies in separate threads, please find them below) Whole Body Vibration simply explained! It goes like this, a voluntary reflex is what we use to walk, jump, run etc. During this movement you use about 40% of your muscle fibers. You think about it and you move, simple right? But think about this, when someone pushes you, you automatically push back to stop yourself from falling over. How does that happen? As with most things that are normal, we seldom look at it closely. It's called an “Involuntary Stretch Reflex” and it's what we use to balance. Our body has an automatic response built into it to try and equal the force being pushed against it (an eccentric contraction) . The important thing to note here is your body will recruit approx 100% of you muscle fibers during this moment, no expense is spared to stop yourself from falling over. And your muscles are also able to move a lot quicker in this response mode than you ever thought possible. Whole body vibration therapy with exercise enhances motor function and improves quality of life in Parkinson’s disease Thursday, June 23, 2016 O.K. Gruder, D.Y. Edmonston, G.Q. Barr, C.G. Maitland (Tallahassee, FL, USA); Meeting: 20th International Congress; Abstract Number: 2021 Objective: To evaluate the short term effects of whole body vibration and exercise in patients with Parkinson’s disease on overall quality of life, gait, tremor, and postural instability using the GAITRite®System (CRI Systems Incorporated), Unified Parkinson’s disease Rating Scale (UPDRS parts 2,3), Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Healthy Days Measure (HRQOL-14). Background: Pharmacologic intervention is the current standard of care for Parkinson’s disease (PD), yet medications frequently fail to control some symptoms, including tremor and postural instability, which degrade functional performance and quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments, including Whole Body Vibration (WBV) and exercise therapy may reduce these symptoms. We combined basic exercise therapy with WBV in a six-week treatment regimen in order to evaluate their effect on symptoms and signs of PD, with careful attention to postural stability, gait, as well as quality of life measures. Methods: 15 participants diagnosed with PD (stages 1-4) underwent 12 sessions of WBV combined with exercise therapy over 6 weeks. Patients’ Demographics and Characteristics Participant No. Gender Age (Years) Previous Level of Physical Activity* Pertinent PmHx** H & Y Staging (UPDRS Motor Score) P01 F 74 Sedentary Titanium rod in left femur, spinal stenosis 1-3 P02 M 79 Sedentary Total knee replacement in right knee 4 P03 M 79 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P04 F 72 Sedentary 4 P05 M 69 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P06 M 83 Sedentary 1-3 P07 F 75 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P08 F Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P09 F 66 Vigorous Physical Activity Previously broken left foot 1-3 P10 F 59 Sedentary Untreated torn rotator cuff, osteoporosis, sciatica 1-3 P11 F Sedentary Arthritic right knee 1-3 P12 M 77 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P13 M 79 Moderate Physical Activity Chronic neck and back pain 1-3 P14 F 69 Sedentary Arthritic right knee 1-3 P15 F 77 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P16 M Sedentary Compound vertebral fracture, valve replacement 4 P17 F 58 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 *Level of physical activity were determined using CDC and ACSM guidelines **All surgeries, replacements were at least 6 months prior to enrolling in the study“. The WBV training included a lower body exercise regimen performed on a vibratory platform. WBV and Exercise Regimen Week Number Session Numbers Exercises Duration (Seconds) Frequency (Seconds[macr]1) 1 1,2 Squats and lunges (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 30 25 2 3,4 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 45 25 3 5,6 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 45 30 4 7,8 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 30 5 9,10 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 35 6 11,12 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 35 Baseline measurements and 2 follow up data collection sessions (1 and 4 days after the final session) included an evaluation of gait via the GAITRite®System, UPDRS parts 2,3, Beck Depression Inventory, FSI, and HRQOL-14. Results: A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine differences between baseline and both post-interventional examinations in all measured parameters. UPDRS scores decreased on average from 29.53(baseline) to 18.00(1 day post-intervention) and 17.53 (4 days post intervention), p<0.001. Both part 2 and 3 of the UPDRS showed statistically significant improvement. Statistically significant improvement in both post-interventional examination for gait velocity, cadence, and double support time was also observed. No significant difference was observed for FSI, Beck Depression, Conclusions: WBV combined with exercise therapy has significant effect on motoric performance, ADL related symptoms, and postural stability. This therapy has significant short-term effects. To cite this abstract in AMA style: O.K. Gruder, D.Y. Edmonston, G.Q. Barr, C.G. Maitland. Whole body vibration therapy with exercise enhances motor function and improves quality of life in Parkinson’s disease [abstract]. Mov Disord. 2016; 31 (suppl 2). http://www.mdsabstracts.org/abstract/whole-body-vibration-therapy-with-exercise-enhances-motor-function-and-improves-quality-of-life-in-parkinsons-disease/. Accessed September 30, 2016. Res Sports Med. 2005 Jul-Sep;13(3):243-56. Effects of random whole-body vibration on postural control in Parkinson’s disease. Turbanski S, Haas CT, Schmidtbleicher D, Friedrich A, Duisberg P. Source Institute of Sport Sciences, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. turbanski@sport.uni-frankfurt.de Abstract We investigated spontaneous effects of random whole-body vibration (rWBV) on postural control in Parkinsonian subjects. Effects were examined in biomechanical tests from a total of 52 patients divided equally into one experimental and one control group. Postural control was tested pre- and post-treatment in two standardized conditions (narrow standing and tandem standing). The intervention was based on rWBV (ŷ: 3 mm, f: 6 Hz/sec) consisting of 5 series lasting 60 seconds each. The main findings from this study were that: 1. rWBV can improve postural stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) spontaneously 2. these effects depend on the test condition. 3. Based on the results of this study, rWBV can be regarded as an additional device in physical therapy in PD. PMID: 16392539
  2. Effects of random whole-body vibration on postural control in Parkinson’s disease. Turbanski S, Haas CT, Schmidtbleicher D, Friedrich A, Duisberg P. Source Institute of Sport Sciences, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. turbanski@sport.uni-frankfurt.de Abstract We investigated spontaneous effects of random whole-body vibration (rWBV) on postural control in Parkinsonian subjects. Effects were examined in biomechanical tests from a total of 52 patients divided equally into one experimental and one control group. Postural control was tested pre- and post-treatment in two standardized conditions (narrow standing and tandem standing). The intervention was based on rWBV (ŷ: 3 mm, f: 6 Hz/sec) consisting of 5 series lasting 60 seconds each. The main findings from this study were that: 1. rWBV can improve postural stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) spontaneously 2. these effects depend on the test condition. 3. Based on the results of this study, rWBV can be regarded as an additional device in physical therapy in PD. PMID: 16392539
  3. Whole body vibration therapy with exercise enhances motor function and improves quality of life in Parkinson’s disease Thursday, June 23, 2016 O.K. Gruder, D.Y. Edmonston, G.Q. Barr, C.G. Maitland (Tallahassee, FL, USA); Meeting: 20th International Congress; Abstract Number: 2021 Objective: To evaluate the short term effects of whole body vibration and exercise in patients with Parkinson’s disease on overall quality of life, gait, tremor, and postural instability using the GAITRite®System (CRI Systems Incorporated), Unified Parkinson’s disease Rating Scale (UPDRS parts 2,3), Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Healthy Days Measure (HRQOL-14). Background: Pharmacologic intervention is the current standard of care for Parkinson’s disease (PD), yet medications frequently fail to control some symptoms, including tremor and postural instability, which degrade functional performance and quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments, including Whole Body Vibration (WBV) and exercise therapy may reduce these symptoms. We combined basic exercise therapy with WBV in a six-week treatment regimen in order to evaluate their effect on symptoms and signs of PD, with careful attention to postural stability, gait, as well as quality of life measures. Methods: 15 participants diagnosed with PD (stages 1-4) underwent 12 sessions of WBV combined with exercise therapy over 6 weeks. Patients’ Demographics and Characteristics Participant No. Gender Age (Years) Previous Level of Physical Activity* Pertinent PmHx** H & Y Staging (UPDRS Motor Score) P01 F 74 Sedentary Titanium rod in left femur, spinal stenosis 1-3 P02 M 79 Sedentary Total knee replacement in right knee 4 P03 M 79 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P04 F 72 Sedentary 4 P05 M 69 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P06 M 83 Sedentary 1-3 P07 F 75 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P08 F Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P09 F 66 Vigorous Physical Activity Previously broken left foot 1-3 P10 F 59 Sedentary Untreated torn rotator cuff, osteoporosis, sciatica 1-3 P11 F Sedentary Arthritic right knee 1-3 P12 M 77 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P13 M 79 Moderate Physical Activity Chronic neck and back pain 1-3 P14 F 69 Sedentary Arthritic right knee 1-3 P15 F 77 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 P16 M Sedentary Compound vertebral fracture, valve replacement 4 P17 F 58 Moderate Physical Activity 1-3 *Level of physical activity were determined using CDC and ACSM guidelines **All surgeries, replacements were at least 6 months prior to enrolling in the study“. The WBV training included a lower body exercise regimen performed on a vibratory platform. WBV and Exercise Regimen Week Number Session Numbers Exercises Duration (Seconds) Frequency (Seconds[macr]1) 1 1,2 Squats and lunges (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 30 25 2 3,4 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 45 25 3 5,6 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 45 30 4 7,8 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 30 5 9,10 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 35 6 11,12 Squats, lunges and calf raises (static and dynamic), tandem stance (twice on each side) 60 35 Baseline measurements and 2 follow up data collection sessions (1 and 4 days after the final session) included an evaluation of gait via the GAITRite®System, UPDRS parts 2,3, Beck Depression Inventory, FSI, and HRQOL-14. Results: A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine differences between baseline and both post-interventional examinations in all measured parameters. UPDRS scores decreased on average from 29.53(baseline) to 18.00(1 day post-intervention) and 17.53 (4 days post intervention), p<0.001. Both part 2 and 3 of the UPDRS showed statistically significant improvement. Statistically significant improvement in both post-interventional examination for gait velocity, cadence, and double support time was also observed. No significant difference was observed for FSI, Beck Depression, Conclusions: WBV combined with exercise therapy has significant effect on motoric performance, ADL related symptoms, and postural stability. This therapy has significant short-term effects.
  4. My Wife and I own the largest vibration studio in Canada, 90% of our clients and customers are from our immediate vicinity. We do not supply vibration machines to the States! My goal is to educate and share a modality that can help maintain muscle strength & mobility. I would be pleased to advise any individual in what to look for in a vibration machine as many are manufactured incorrectly. The link below will explain how the technology works! https://player.vimeo.com/video/53138120
  5. I have been involved in Vibration Therapy since 2008 & in the Fitness Industry since 1995. When using correct spec machines, studies have shown very positive results for many degenerative conditions including Parkinson’s. Please read below how the technology works in regard to Parkinson’s, I will post Three Clinical Studies in the coming days. Whole-body vibration therapy can improve overall motor control because it stimulates many muscles across your body. The activity generated by vibrations can make you stronger and increase the stability that muscles and joints naturally try to maintain, according to leading research. When looking specifically at Parkinson’s disease, researchers found that a vibration therapy machine was able to create improvements in every symptom they measured. Patients had fewer tremors, less rigidity in their joints and muscles and were able to perform fine motor function tasks better. Parkinson’s disease cannot be cured today, but doctors work hard to help patients control symptoms. Whole-body vibration therapy can play a major role in keeping muscles healthy and retaining control. Every reduction in tremors is a major win for any sufferer and their family. We’re excited to see how much sufferers will benefit as vibration therapy machines become part of standard therapy and long-term studies determine the full extent of its benefits.
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