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Found 2 results

  1. Last Friday, I finished the five-day inpatient portion of a Phase 1 clinical trial for BIIB054, an immunotherapy treatment for PD being tested for the pharmaceutical company Biogen. Details of the trial (still recruiting at some locations, I believe) are here: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02459886 Overall, the experience of participating in the trial has been very worthwhile. As the saying goes, there were stretches of boredom punctuated by brief moments of--okay, certainly not terror--but heightened anxiety. To prepare for the trial, I was required to stop some medications, and undergo blood and urine tests, an EKG, an MRI, and a DaTScan. Blood, urine, EKG, and MRI were to confirm good health (apart from PD); the DaTScan confirmed my dx. Cost of all testing (including DaTScan) was covered. Infusion of the study drug was done during a five-day, four-night inpatient stay in a research clinic. The study drug (or placebo) had already been administered in higher doses to 40 volunteers without PD, and a handful of volunteers with PD, with no significant side effects. My MDS is one of the study doctors--I felt the potential benefits for research and for myself outweighed the modest risks. I was well compensated for travel and time, and the catered meals were *far* better than hospital food. Day 1 was a battery of blood and urine panels, plus multiple EKGs, blood pressure readings lying down and standing up, MDS exams, and collection of cerebral spinal fluid via lumbar puncture (spinal tap). I was more than a little nervous about the spinal tap, but it turned out to be much less of a big deal than I imagined. Very little pain (just a little poke from the lidocaine injection, and a bit of pressure when the needle went it). After that, I was hooked up to radio telemetry to continuously monitor heart rate for the next 48, and spent the next several hours in the clinic's waiting room. By the evening, when we moved to the clinic annex where the bedrooms were located, I had a fair amount of discomfort in my lower back. This may have been a reaction to the lidocaine. I was given ibuprofen, which provided good relief, and was fine the next morning. There was another volunteer participating in the trial at the same time--that, plus books and internet, was a good distraction from a whole lot of sitting around waiting for the next blood draw, the next EKG, etc. Day 2 was infusion of the study drug (2/3 chance, two possible doses) or placebo (1/3 chance). Infusion was via IV and took about an hour. Some combination of fasting, lying flat on my back for an hour and who-knows-what caused pretty bad heartburn during the last 15 minutes of the the procedure. When I mentioned this, I was given immediate EKG and had blood pressure checked to rule out possible complications. For the rest of the day, we had regular blood draws to monitor the drug as it moved toward and crossed the blood-brain barrier. Day 3 was more of the same. The telemetry came off, and by afternoon, we were given the chance to take a shower and get out of the clinic for a few hours. I met up with a friend in the area and we went for a hike in a nearby park. Good to move the legs after 2 1/2 days sitting. Day 4 was another MRI in the morning, more routine blood draws and EKGs, plus another afternoon release (for good behavior?) On Day 5, when the results from the MRI came back, we had final MDS exams, and were released. There will be a series of followups over the next 16 weeks, including two more spinal taps and another MRI. I was told BIIB054 isn't expected to offer symptomatic benefits, but may (if it works, and if I got the active drug) slow progression by 4-5 times the rate without the drug. As I understand it, the drug is an antibody engineered to bind with the clumping form of alpha-synuclein, and clear it from the brain. The 'moonshot' (as my MDS put it), is that the drug will prevent the formation of Lewy bodies, and even reverse some disease progression. Needless to say, everyone at the clinic is very excited about this trial (and very appreciative of the patient volunteers). Given the lack of negative side effects, a Phase 2 trial is expected very soon (perhaps this fall), and it appears Phase 1 patients will also be eligible for Phase 2. I don't know if Phase 2 testing will be as invasive or require an inpatient stay. We often hear that new drugs take a very long time to pass human trials and get released to market--what I heard from clinic researchers was that with good recruitment and positive results, new drugs can be released quite quickly, perhaps 4 years or less from initial human testing. I feel fortunate to have an MDS committed to active research as well as top-notch patient care, and clinical research facilities located relatively close by. In fact, my MDS will be conducting Phase 2 trials of the drug Nilotinib soon. I don't know if I'll qualify, but it's exciting having cutting-edge stuff happening so close to home. Finally. a little soapbox: with a number of promising PD treatments in the pipeline, this is an excellent time for PWPs to get serious about research, by volunteering for trials (not for everyone, I know), and/or by contributing to organizations that support research (like the Fox Foundation), and advocating for increased support and funding for basic research through NIH and NSF. The basic research underlying all these new treatment has been twenty years or so in the making--too long a horizon to payback to expect private companies to do it alone.
  2. Hello all, It's been a while since I've posted. This coming Monday, I start the inpatient segment of a Phase 1 double blind clinical trial, testing a new immunotherapy treatment for PD. Details of the trial are here: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02459886 The trial is fairly invasive, including IV administration of the study drug (or placebo), five days of inpatient stay with 24 hour monitoring, multiple lumbar punctures (spinal taps), and MRIs. To qualify, I've had to drop all meds except Azilect (people on stable doses of Sinemet also qualify, I believe), and undergo a series of health screens, including DaTScan. Reasonably good health (apart from PD) and a positive DaTScan are required. Since most Phase 1 trials don't pan out, and I have a 1/3 chance of getting the placebo, I'm not expecting personal benefit. But the science is very cool--the hope is the compound (engineered antibodies) will clear misfolded alpha-synuclien proteins from the brain and dramatically slow PD progression. Immunotherapy treatments from other companies have already made it past Phase 1, and are starting Phase 2, so even if this particular trial doesn't produce good results, it seems the general approach has a lot of promise. My MDS is one of the study doctors, so I feel like I'm in good hands, and compensation for my time and travel is quite reasonable. Certainly there are risks involved, but I believe they are relatively small and manageable. I'll post more as the experience continues.
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