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Found 17 results

  1. Nutrition interventions

    Hi all - Just joined this forum specifically to participate in the nutrition forum, which I see is closed. Wondering what people are doing nutritionally and lifestyle-wise to support the meds and DBS interventions. I was diagnosed in 2011, had DBS in 2014, and am now eating a ketogenic diet, exercising, and using intermittent fasting to what feels like good effect. Any body else?
  2. I was diagnosed with idiopathic PD 15 months ago. My diet at the time of diagnosis consisted of organic, non-GMO foods, no salt or sugar, high fiber, NO processed foods, and, most importantly, low carb. This last thing was my take on Atkins/SouthBeach/Paleo/etc. I was able to lose 30 lbs. in one year. I can still afford to lose 70 more pounds to get to an appropriate weight. All my systems are in great shape (labs, B/P, EKG, etc.). However, my musculoskeletal system is the pits, and I've just had my second back surgery, so I have to start all over with exercise. In learning about living with PD, I understand now how important nutrition is to PD, and I'm trying to find out what kind of regimen will keep me healthy with regards to PD AND allow me to lose weight. LOW CARB was working great until my first back surgery, and I've gained most of the weight back. So my question is: what kind of diet/nutrition regimen should I follow that will keep me healthy vis-a-vis PD and also allow me to lose weight. I know this is a large question, so links, articles, references, or pointers will suffice. I'm a good researcher. Many thanks in advance...
  3. Nutrition and PD

    Would you comment on Mischley's recently published study? Is the methodology sound? Is there anything in there for those of us with PD, or does this study need to be replicated first before we change our diets? Thanks for your "take" on this.
  4. Hey all - a family member was recently diagnosed and has been prescribed Azilect, an MAO-B inhibitor. I'm a nutrition major, so naturally I wanted to read up on any dietary restrictions. I've read that one should avoid consuming foods that are high in tyramine when taking this medication, as it can lead to increased blood pressure. I have a list of foods to avoid, but was wondering how much restriction is necessary? What are the limitations? It would be great if a Registered Dietitian could chime in! Thanks and happy holidays
  5. So many questions

    New to the forum so I'll start with an intro. 30 year old Canadian living in China. Diagnosed a year and a half ago. Symptoms began over three years ago. No medication to date but considering starting to take Amantadine soon. I was doing pretty well until recently when some personal problems started to impact my progression. I realize now, especially living so far away from home and family, that I need contact with other people who might be dealing with PD to help me through this. So I've come here. I have a lot of questions and would appreciate any help I can get. 1. Exercise - As I've seen time and time again, exercise is vitally important to helping manage PD. I exercise regularly and if nothing else it definitely helps my mood. But I do notice that many exercises exacerbate my tremor while I am doing them. Should I discontinue doing those exercises or just fight through them? Should I cut down on weight lifting? Core and balance exercises in particular give me the shakes, though I continue to read of their importance, should I just persevere? 2. Caffeine - I've read a lot about the positive benefits of Caffeine. However, much like my exercise problem, I notice that caffeine also makes me shake more. Again, should I ignore the symptoms and drink coffee or green tea anyway because of their potential long term benefits or should I stop drinking them? 3. Diet - Turmeric. B12. Antioxidants. Q12. Magnesium. Calcium blockers. L-Tyrosine. Vitamin D. It goes on and on The list of recommended supplements is seemingly never ending. I've been advised by my specialist in Canada not to worry about them and just make sure I eat a balanced diet. Plenty of fruits and vegetables. Needless to say, it's all a bit confusing. Anybody have anything more definitive I could take a look at? 4. Retreat - I'm planning at some point in the future of going on a Parkinsons retreat of sorts. Some place where I can go for a few weeks or months and just focus on how best to manage this disease. Ideally somewhere warm with a beach where I can consult with physicians and dietitians and physiotherapists and learn how to ensure that I maintain the highest possible quality of life. Anybody know if such a place exists? 5. Isradapine - Is anybody involved or participating in the ongoing clinical trial on Isradipine? Any results, preliminary though they might be, that can be shared at this time? 6. China - I live and work in China, I've been here for four and a half years, I speak the language and have a good circle of connections here. I'm looking to see how I can help make a difference to people with PD here. I've visited a number of specialists here and have come away feeling that they are not always able to provide the best treatment to their patients. Anybody have any suggestions or know anyways that I could help bridge the divide between here and the west in terms of providing better patient care? 7. Biological determinism - I took part in the 23 and me study and it turns out that I have one of the variants associated with Parkinsons Disease. I have one copy of the N370S variant in the GBA gene. I've been told there is nothing I can really do with this information and that it does not effect how I manage the disease. That said, I'm curious to know what epigenetic factors might influence it, or have influenced it, and what does it say about how I will progress. 8. Online - In addition to this forum, what other forums should I be following for PD related information? That's it for now, thank you for taking the time to read it and if you have any information that you think might be useful please share.
  6. http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/171Ahi/zC5eI1Xn:nnQnF_.k/www.ivyious.us/2014/09/things-you-never-knew-about-bananas.html Banana....!
  7. Hello, once again it is your resident guinea pig case study representing the most all-inclusive data supported nutritional tactics in PD management. There has been some significant updates since the last thread. I hope this one will be of more long-term value. PURPOSE: There is a LOT of good information and disinformation related to nutritional tactics intended to manage Parkinson’s Disease. My goal is in 20 years to be able to look back and know that I tried everything possible to minimize the impact PD has on the quality of my life. PD HISTORY: 2012 – Occasional difficulty swallowing, walking slower, minimal sense of smell (realized later) 2013 – Fatigue, left index finger tremor, apathy MARCH 2014 – Official PD diagnosis based on neurologist observations and positive response to L-DOPA (Sinemet) Began taking 5mg x 2 of Selegiline. Symptoms subsided. APRIL 2014 – Began nutritional protocol JUNE 2014 – Discontinued Selegiline. Symptoms did not return. Felt better than had in years. NOVEMBER 2014 – Series of very stressful events, minimal exercise and reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms, including all previous symptoms and new symptoms related to a significant loss of balance, tremor occurrence and severity, dizziness, severe fatigue and other typical PD issues. Selegiline resumed and 90% of symptoms disappeared. The nutritional protocol has been adjusted based on new research. Discipline to the nutritional protocol has been elevated and re-established. PROTOCOL THEORETICAL TACTICS: · Remove neurotoxins and limit exposure to any new known neurotoxins. · Create an environment that best supports neurons (more sleep / less stress) · Support the neuron mitochondria for adequate cellular energy (glucose) · Support glucose alternate neuron cellular energy through the ketone process bypassing the issues of mitochondria deficiencies (ketone) · Directly address the common anti-oxidant deficiencies and excessive free radicals that is a cause of additional neural stress. · Minimize or remove the neural swelling that is a cause of additional neural stress. · Increase the ability to create dopamine. COMMON QUESTIONS 1) How long does it take to manage the protocol? On average, it takes me 68 minutes every two weeks to order and inventory product, and to fill two weeks worth of pill organizers. Outside of exercise, taking the supplements is minimal and is usually included in daily activities such as work, driving, watching TV, etc. However, if you do this the hard way, it could be frustrating and take a lot of time. Currently, the protocol has little to no impact on my time, which is important because I run two businesses and I have a family. 2) How much does it cost to follow the protocol as outlined below? If in the United States, and buying online from the most discounted sources, supplements only would be about $6,689.15 annually, or $557.43 per month. Most would agree that is a lot of money for an unproven protocol. I also agree. I even have to pay more because I do not live in the United States. 3) Are there risks? Yes, there are always risks. You could spend a lot of money for little gain in health. You could have an adverse reaction and cause harm to yourself. However, most of these products are known to be very safe and have known benefits outside of helping with only Parkinson’s disease. Do your own do diligence and make your own decisions. 4) Some of the data is only theoretical, or based on animal studies, why would you include that in your protocol? If I was nutritionist or doctor advising a patient, I would tell the patient to wait for more human clinical research. That is the “safe” answer. However, I currently have Parkinson’s disease today, right now. The only solution that currently exists for PD does not reverse, stop, or slow progression. This means that my PD is worse today than it was yesterday. Unless I find another solution, then that will always be true. Current medication only hides the problem for a time, until it bites you in the face later. At that point, knowing my personality, 20 years later, I would be filled with great regret and despair knowing I did not try everything I could when I could. Knowing the time tested safety of all of these products, the biggest risk is to my pocket book. I have a wonderful wife and three small children, and it makes me happy today knowing I am trying everything possible to provide to my family the best version of myself that I can. It could take five years or more for human clinical trials to occur, if even then. In PD world, five years is an eternity. In addition, many of these nutritional tactics work synergistically. Clinical trials like to test these things individually, which destroys the whole theory of this protocol. I act on the data I have today. I do not have the luxury of waiting for data that may or may not exist tomorrow. I will make my own data based on my own results and through my own decisions. 5) Would you recommend this protocol to others? Not likely. All I know is that it worked for some time, but stopped working as the protocol could not handle significant stress. Admittingly, my discipline to the protocol was lacking during this time as well. This means that the protocol certainly provides value in managing PD, but it is difficult to tell to what extent. More data and time is needed. I share the protocol because there might be others like me who hate PD as much as I do and want to do everything possible to neutralize PD symptoms or the disease itself. If such other persons exist, we can share data and results, and learn from it. RECENT CHANGES: 1) Minimizing stress is essential. I have managed to eliminate recent stress and introduce stability. To the best of my ability, I will try to control my environment and reactions to my circumstances. Stress is a nuclear bomb to PD and I was not prepared for that. 2) Discipline in exercise is critical. I allowed myself to be lazy because I was feeling great. The protocol is a life long decision. Not following the protocol exactly as I designed it proved disastrous. I suffered the consequences and I have learned from it. 3) I realized that I needed to provide my neurons an alternative energy source that is not primary dependent upon glucose. Glucose utilization is inefficient in Parkinson’s patients, and thus I was not remotely equipped to handle recent stress. My brain became starved for energy and I lost my gain in my ability to produce my own dopamine. Thus, ketones has been added to the protocol. In addition, nicotine as an antoxident/neuroprotectant, ginger as antoxident/neuroprotectant, and melatonin as a antoxident/neuroprotectant and sleep aid have been added to the protocol due to the outcome of additional research. 4) I will begin the new changes in the nutritional protocol, along with the necessary discipline in all aspects beginning December 1, 2014. I plan on reducing Selegiline by 50% on February 1 2015, and pending that outcome, then reducing Selegiline by 100% on April 1, 2015. THE PROTOCOL Sleep Adequate sleep is critical for neural health. Some of the primary functions of sleep is to detoxify the brain of toxic substances that accumulated throughout the day, eliminate free radicals, restore vital nutrients, and repair and restore damaged cells. Because Parkinson's is a chronic neural disease, inadequate sleep would only accelerate disease progression whereas sufficient sleep would contribute to slowing down progression. In addition, "The Protocol" is primarily based on nutrition. Sufficient sleep enables the brain to take full advantage of the nutrition that "The Protocol" makes available. Sleep is foundational to "The Protocol." Recommendation: Minimum of 8.5 hours of quality sleep per day. Wake up naturally instead of with an alarm. If your body needs more sleep, then let it sleep. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Exercise Besides all of the regular benefits and increased general wellness of exercise, Parkinson's patients benefit greatly with a disciplined exercise program. Parkinson's threatens mobility control and balance, whereas exercise can enhance these things. Exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which is the delivery system of all of the nutrients found in "The Protocol." Exercises assists the body with various types of stress, which allows the body to focus on healing instead of managing stress. Lastly, sweating is a means of your body to rid yourself of toxins. Toxins residing in the brain is believed to be the number one cause of Parkinson's. Recommendation: Minimum of 20 minutes of cardio 3 times per week (60-80% maximum heart rate). Full body resistance training once per week, or divided into muscle groups throughout the week. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 Stress Management Stress has shown to amplify Parkinson’s symptoms and quickly accelerate cell death. Stress alone has been clinically shown in animals to actually create Parkinson’s disease. Positive thinking and mitigating stressful situations are not only ideal, but critical. When the body is fighting stress, it is not as focused on healing or repairing your cells, tissues, or body systems. A Parkinson's patient needs to maximize the body's ability to heal, restore, and maintain cellular function. Create a daily routine and try to stick with it. Recommendation: Identify consistent and predictable stress in your life and work to minimize environmental stressors and when not possible, at minimum, learn how to control your reaction to such stress in the most positive way. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4 Neural and Body Detox (Clinoptilolite) ($359.94/Annually) Research as shown that most cases of Parkinson's are caused by environmental toxins, primary cause toxins being metals and/or pesticides. Our bodies can only process out so many toxins per day. Too many toxins causes our body to "quarantine" toxins in places so they are no longer in our blood stream. When this happens, those toxins can damage area cells. As long as those toxins are still there, slowing down Parkinson's progression is an uphill battle. First, we need to remove the toxins to, in theory, remove the cause. ZeoForce has clinical studies showing the safe removal of toxins, processed out via urine. Recommendation: We recommend purchasing two large containers to simplify your nutritional supplementation. Research or Scientific Support: ​Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4; Research 5; Research 6; Research 7; also recent anti cancer benefits have been published Research 8 Pill Organizer (2 Containers, Large, 4x Day, 7 Days a Week) The rest of "The Protocol" focuses on supplemental nutrition. This will become a lot of pills. If you do not like taking pills, this will be difficult for you. Even if taking pills does not bother you, managing them could be frustrating and complicated. Thus, in the spirit of "Stress Management" here are a couple suggestions. 1) Order 2-3 large pill organizers. 2) On your supplement containers, note on them when and how often per day each is taken. For example, for a pill that is taken 2 x morning, 0 x lunch, 1 x evening, 0 x bedtime, you may want to write "2-0-1-0" on that bottle. Then, refilling your pill container(s) each week is simplified. Keep 3 months of inventory of each product on a dedicated shelf or large cabinet. When a product is emptied, set it aside. When you are finished filling your pill containers, use the empty product bottles serve as your trigger to order that product discounted online and shipped directly to your house. If this takes you more than 90 minutes every two weeks, then you can still do better at this process. Coenzyme Q10 ($920.71/Annually) Research has shown that 1,200 mg daily reduced average Parkinson's Disease progression by 44% over a period of 16 months. The suspected reason for this is because CoQ10 supports cellular mitochondria, slowing down the death of neurons in the substantia nigra. Parkinson's patients are often deficient in coenzyme Q10 and have dysfunctional mitochondria. Mitochondria are the "energy factories" of cells. In the case of Parkinson’s, dysfunctional mitochondria can result in cellular dysfunction (temporarily no dopamine, but restorable) or neural cell death (permanent dopamine loss). Several doctors recommend 2,000 mg a day.​ Recommendation: 800mg at morning, 400mg at lunch, 400mg at evening, and 400mg at bedtime. (adjust slowly if it upsets stomach) ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4; Research 5; Research 6; Reishi (Ganoderma Lucidum) ($280.88/Annually) Abundant evidence has suggested that neuroinflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The emerging evidence has supported that microglia may play key roles in the progressive neurodegeneration in PD and might be a promising therapeutic target. Ganoderma lucidum (GL), a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has been shown potential neuroprotective effects in clinical trials that suggests that it might possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties. ​ Recommendation: 540mg at morning, 540mg at lunch, and 540mg at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1 B Vitamins (Fully Active)(LypoSpheric) ($436.80/Annually) The B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins that are required as coenzymes for reactions essential for cellular function. Folate and choline are believed to be central methyl donors required for mitochondrial protein and nucleic acid synthesis through their active forms, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and betaine, respectively. Cobalamin (B12) may assist methyltetrahydrofolate in the synthesis of methionine, a cysteine source for glutathione biosynthesis. Pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine (B6) seem to be involved in the regeneration of tetrahydrofolate into the active methyl-bearing form and in glutathione biosynthesis from homocysteine. ​ Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning, do not eat for at least 15 minutes ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 NAC ($45.56/Annually) Once it is in the bloodstream, NAC gets converted into glutathione, which is a potent antioxidant that is also made by the body. It is unclear whether the low glutathione content in the PD substantia nigra is due to impaired production, or because the burden of free-radicals is excessive. Several links exist between the two mechanisms of neuronal degeneration (i.e., oxygen radical production and mitochondrial damage) proposed to have a role in Parkinson's disease. Indeed, mitochondria are critical targets for the toxic injury induced by oxygen radicals, and experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial damage may cause an increased generation of oxygen radicals. A potentially important link between these two mechanisms of neurodegeneration is glutathione. Because of the scavenging activity of glutathione against accumulation of oxygen radicals, its decrease in the brains of parkinsonian patients has been interpreted as a sign of oxidative stress; however, this change may also result from or lead to mitochondrial damage. It is conceivable therefore that regardless of whether oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage represents the initial insult, these toxic mechanisms may both contribute to neuronal degeneration via changes in glutathione levels.​ Recommendation: 600mg at lunch, and 600mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 L-Tyrosine ($45.92/Annually) A study published in 1982 in "Life Sciences" indicates that L-tyrosine may benefit people with Parkinson's disease. Researchers administered 100 mg/kg of L-tyrosine to each of the 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. According to the researchers, L-tyrosine alleviates the symptoms of Parkinson's disease by increasing the levels of dopamine in the brain.​ Recommendation: 500mg at lunch, 500mg at evening and 500mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Vitamin D3 ($6.00/Annually) Parkinson's disease patients are deficient in D3 and research has shown that D3 slows PD progression.​ The results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial reported online on March 13, 2013 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveal a benefit for vitamin D supplementation in men and women with Parkinson's disease. Recommendation: 5000iu at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 Astaxanthin ($137.41/Annually) ATX suppresses MPP+-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells via the HO-1/NOX2 axis. ATX should be strongly considered as a potential neuroprotectant and adjuvant therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease.​ In a recent study, researchers found that Astaxanthin blocked the MPP+ related Heme oxygenase process implicated in nerve and brain cell damage. This type of oxidative damage has been linked to Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Recommendation: 4mg at morning, 4mg at lunch, 4mg at evening and 4mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Omega 3 ($139.47/Annually) Researchers observed that when mice were fed an omega-3 rich diet, they seemed immune to the effect of MPTP, a toxic compound that causes the same damage to the brain as Parkinson’s. This compound, which has been used for more than 20 years in Parkinson’s research, works faster than the disease itself and is just as effective in targeting and destroying the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. Recommendation: 500/250 of Omega 3/DHA at morning, noon, evening, and bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 Chaga (Dihydroxybenzalacetone) ($128.43/Annually) Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). 3,4-Dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL) is a small catechol-containing compound isolated from Chaga (Inonotus obliquus [persoon] Pilat), and has been reported to have beneficial bioactivities, including antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumorigenic activities, with a relatively low toxicity to normal cells. Quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibitor, abolished the protective effect of DBL against 6-OHDA. Furthermore, DBL activated stress-associated kinases such as Akt, ERK, and p38 MAPK, and PI3K or Akt inhibitors, but not ERK, p38, or JNK inhibitors, diminished DBL-induced glutathione synthesis and protection against 6-OHDA. These results suggest that DBL activates the Nrf2/glutathione pathway through PI3K/Akt, and improves survival of SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity.​​ Recommendation: 350mg at morning, 350mg at evening and 350mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1 Horse Chestnut (Triterpenoids) ($27.09/Annually) A class of antioxidants called synthetic triterpenoids blocked development of Parkinson's in an animal model. In Parkinson's patients you can clearly see a significant overload of oxidative stress, which is why antioxidents provide significant positive results to PD patients. Preliminary evidence indicates the synthetic triterpenoids also increase Nrf2 activity in astrocytes, a brain cell type which nourishes neurons and hauls off some of their garbage. Recommendation: 400mg at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1 Green Tea (GTPs) ($55.00/Annually) GTPs have antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities.There have been some studies suggesting that these compounds could have a neuroprotective effect and possibly even a treatment effect in PD.The Chinese Ministry of Health and the Michael J. Fox Foundation, with the assistance of Dr. Caroline Tanner of the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center in Sunnyvale, CA (NPF Center of Excellence) are currently studying whether GTPs can slow the progression of PD in a large, placebo-controlled study. Recommendation: 350mg at lunch, and 350mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Glutathione (GSH)(LypoSpheric) ($767.40/Annually) A powerful antioxidant and those with PD are often deficient. GSH does well in eliminating free radicals and neurotoxins and in fact, often called the mother antioxidant. PD is known to be caused by neurotoxins and neurons are also under oxidative stress. Lypo spheric delivery of GSH avoids destruction by the digestive process and ensures the best possible delivery into the blood stream. This avoids the need for intraveneously taking GSH. Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning, do not eat for at least 15 minutes ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Vitamin C (Fully Active)(LypoSpheric) ($872.80/Annually) Parkinson's disease patients given large doses of oral vitamin C and synthetic vitamin E supplements (3000mg and 3200 IU daily respectively) delayed the progression of their disease to the point where they needed l-dopa 2.5 years later than a group of patients who were not taking supplements. Later research has shown that synthetic vitamin E in itself does not retard the progression of Parkinson's disease. Thus it is likely that it was vitamin C by itself or its combination with vitamin E that was the active component in Dr. Fahn's experiment. This fits with a later finding that vitamin E, a fat-soluble vitamin, does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier nor does it accumulate in the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain. Vitamin C, on the other hand, while not crossing the blood-brain barrier does enter the cerebrospinal fluid and can be found there in concentrations proportional to dietary intake. Inasmuch as vitamin C is a highly effective antioxidant and is particularly adept in quenching hydroxyl radicals (the main culprits in the dopamine-cell destruction), it is becoming increasingly clear that this vitamin may be an excellent protector against Parkinson's disease and can materially help in slowing down the progression of the disease. Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning and afternoon on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Resveratrol ($124.54/Annually) Resveratrol attenuates 6 hydroxydopamine induced oxidative damage and dopamine depletion in rat model of Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment also significantly decreased the levels of COX-2 and TNF-alpha mRNA in the substantia nigra as detected by real-time RT-PCR. COX-2 protein expression in the substantia nigra was also decreased as evidenced by Western blotting. These results demonstrate that resveratrol exerts a neuroprotective effect on 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease rat model, and this protection is related to the reduced Inflammatory reaction. Recommendation: 200mg at lunch, and 200mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Pending Research; Amino Acids ($134.40/Annually) Amino acids stimulate nerve cells to produce dopamine and prevent degenerative changes of neurons in the substantia nigra. This results in the reduction of neurological symptoms and improvement of rigidity, bradykinesis, gait and cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson’s disease. When administering amino acid compounds, administration of levodopa can be reduced, thus reducing the side effects of the treatment. Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, 4 capsules at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Iron (Gentle Iron Recommended) ($26.19/Annually) Increased iron levels in the blood are associated with a decreased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to a new study which appears in the June 2013 issue of PLoS One. Estimated higher iron levels in the blood are associated with a three percent reduction in the risk of Parkinson’s disease for every 10 µg/dL increase in iron. Gentle iron is recommended to avoid digestive issues. Recommendation: 18mg at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; L-Carnosine ($224.28/Annually) Carnosine has been studied in Parkinson’s disease. The addition of the neuropeptide carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) as a food additive to the basic protocol of Parkinson's disease treatment results in significant improvement of neurological symptoms, along with increase in red blood cell Cu/Zn-SOD and decrease in blood plasma protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides, with no noticeable change in platelets MAO B activity. The combination of carnosine with basic therapy may be a useful way to increase efficiency of PD treatment. Recommendation: 500mg at morning, 500mg at lunch, and 500mg at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; *Pepper E, Farrell M, Nord G, Finkel S. Antiglycation effects of carnosine and other compounds on the long-term survival of Escherichia coli.Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2010;76(24): 7925-7930. Lipoic Acid (LypoSpheric and Capsules) ($767.40/Annually) Lipoic acid protects brain tissue from the long-term effects of advanced glycation end products and the resulting inflammation and oxidative damage, conditions that lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Lipoic acid reduces amyloid-beta-induced inflammation and improves brain cells’ production of the chemical signaling molecules called neurotransmitters. Mitochondrial function is significantly impaired in the brains of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease patients and lipoic acid decreases mitochondrial oxidant stress in those cells. Recommendation: 1 R-ALA LypoSpheric packet in the morning at least 15 minutes before breakfast, 250mg (R-ALA capsule) at evening, 250mg (R-ALA capsule) at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4 L-Carnitine ($40.19/Annually) Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid affect rotenone-induced damage in nigral dopaminergic neurons of rat brain, implication for Parkinson's disease therapy. Recommendation: 500mg at lunch ​Research or Scientific Support:Research 1; Research 2 PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline Quinone): ($219.36/Annually) PQQ dramatically inhibits fibril formation in C-terminal-truncated α-Syn, as well as in mixtures of full-length α-Syn with truncated variants. Moreover, PQQ decreases the cytotoxicity of truncated α-Syn. Together with other findings on the inhibitors of amyloid proteins, this suggests that inhibitors other than PQQ, which also bind to target proteins, could prevent the aggregation and fibrillation of truncated α-Syn in a similar manner. In any case, PQQ is a strong candidate for a reagent compound in the treatment of PD and related diseases. Recommendation: 20mg at evening ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4 Curcumin: ($90.48/Annually) Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. Recommendation: 630mg at lunch ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1 Caffeine: (pills - not soda or coffee) There have been several recent studies suggesting that caffeine may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by offering neural protective support. In a recent edition of the journal Neurology, there is a new study suggesting that caffeine may be a reasonable treatment for the Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms. Because caffeine is a drug (though found naturally) and not considered nutritional support, some may opt to not include this in "The Protocol." Recommendation: 200mg to 400mg per day, preferably not after 3pm and not in the form of sugary drinks. Increase dosage slowly. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Nicotine: (gum/patch) “Nicotine has separate mechanisms by which it may protect brain cells, aside from its influence on dopamine,” Boyd says. “One of the functions of nicotinic receptors is to moderate the entry of calcium into cells. The presence of nicotine increases the amount of intracellular calcium, which appears to improve cellular survival.” Because nicotine is a drug (though found naturally) and not considered nutritional support, some may opt to not include this in "The Protocol." Recommendation: 6-10mg at 2mg dosages spread throughout the day. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 DHEA (7-KETO): ($96.27Anually) Low DHEA-S is correlated with Parkinson’s and also naturally decreases with age. DHEA has been shown to help with Parkinson’s symptoms and combat aging in general. DHEA helps with inflammation, which is a known problem in the region of the brain affected by Parkinson's disease. 7-Keto is a form of DHEA that does not convert into testosterone and estrogen and is recommended over regular DHEA. DHEA is an actual hormone and it is first recommended that you see a doctor or complete labs to determine if your DHEA levels are low enough to warrant supplementation. Recommendation: 100mg DHEA 7-Keto at morning (25mg if female) ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 ​ 5 HTP: ($39.87/Annually) 5-HTP is the precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin which regulates mood and combats depression. Commercially available 5-HTP is obtained from the seeds of the plant Griffonia simplicifolia. 5-HTP has been suggested as a treatment for Parkinson's to assist with the commonly associated depression symptoms Recommendation: 200mg before bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 MK-7; VItamin K-2: ($35.64/Annually) Vitamin K2 plays a role in the energy production of defective mitochondria. Because defective mitochondria are also found in Parkinson's patients with a PINK1 or Parkin mutation, vitamin K2 potentially offers hope for a new treatment for Parkinson's. Studies using fruit flies have shown positive results. Recommendation: 100 mcg at breakfast ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Probiotic: ($59.96/Annually) Parkinson's disease patients showed improvement in multiple symptoms of the disease after being treated for Helicobacter pylori infection, researchers reported. Probiotics are a great alternative to antibiotics to replace bad bacteria with good bacteria. Recommendation: 1 capsule before bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2 Ginger: ($29.76/Annually) 6-Shogaol [1-(4-hydroxy-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-one], a pungent compound isolated from ginger, has shown various neurobiological and anti-inflammatory effects. In MPP(+)-treated rat mesencephalic cultures, 6-shogaol significantly increased the number of TH-IR neurons and suppressed TNF-α and NO levels. In C57/BL mice, treatment with 6-shogaol reversed MPTP-induced changes in motor coordination and bradykinesia. Furthermore, 6-shogaol reversed MPTP-induced reductions in TH-positive cell number in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and TH-IR fiber intensity in stratum (ST). Moreover, 6-shogaol significantly inhibited the MPTP-induced microglial activation and increases in the levels of TNF-α, NO, iNOS, and COX-2 in both SNpc and ST. CONCLUSION: 6-Shogaol exerts neuroprotective effects on DA neurons in in vitro and in vivo PD models. Recommendation: 2 capsules before bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Melatonin: ($9.28/Annually) Sleep disorders constitute major nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that have a substantial effect on patients’ quality of life and can be related to the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. They can also serve as preclinical markers for PD, as it is the case for rapid eye movement (REM)-associated sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although the etiology of sleep disorders in PD remains undefined, the assessment of the components of the circadian system, including melatonin secretion, could give therapeutically valuable insight on their pathophysiopathology. Melatonin is a regulator of the sleep/wake cycle and also acts as an effective antioxidant and mitochondrial function protector. A reduction in the expression of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors has been documented in the substantia nigra of PD patients. The efficacy of melatonin for preventing neuronal cell death and for ameliorating PD symptoms has been demonstrated in animal models of PD employing neurotoxins. A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is useful in treating disturbed sleep in PD, in particular RBD. Recommendation: 1 capsules (5mg) before bedtime Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4; Research 5; Research 6; Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT): ($384.72/Annually) Observations are supported by studies in animal models and isolated cells that show that ketone bodies, especially β-hydroxybutyrate, confer neuroprotection against diverse types of cellular injury. Scientists were able to recover some of the function of the mitochondria. Most important, the scientists report in the September Journal of Clinical Investigation, the high dose of the ketone prevented the mice from developing Parkinson's-like movement problems. The Columbia researchers' findings support the idea that ketones could help people with Parkinson's disease, says Theodore B. VanItallie of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City. "There's enough evidence available now to encourage people to test the hypothesis," he says. "There's at least a reasonable possibility that these things [ketones] will work." Recommendation: 1.5 TBS of MCT oil after breakfast, lunch, and dinner (or 2 TBS of coconut oil) ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 (clinical trial pending) Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT): Low testosterone has been shown to be a correlation, if not causal relationship, with Parkinson’s. Testosterone replacement therapy has been shown to slow or perhaps even reverse Parkinson’s progression in animal studies. Testosterone naturally decreases with age. Most "anti-aging" doctors will recommend bringing a patient back to upper natural levels of 900-1200. This is a schedule III drug and should only be considered under the recommendation and supervision of a doctor to determine if you are a candidate. It is recommended that gels are avoided and injectables be the form of testosterone delivery. Recommendation: See your doctor (a doctor that understand Testosterone Therapy and is not ok with T levels of an 80 year old. ​Research or Scientific Support: Research 1 See your doctor Multi-Mineral Support: ($142.40/Annually) It is difficult to sufficiently obtain all of the minerals your body needs through regular diet. Minerals are necessary for basic health, cellular function, and PH balance. They are a cost effective means to assist with general health and should be a component of any health maintenance program. Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, and 4 capsules at bedtime ​Research or Scientific Support: Multi-Vitamin Support: ($71.96/Annually) It is difficult to sufficiently obtain all of the vitamins your body needs through regular diet. Vitamins are necessary for basic health and cellular function. They are a cost effective means to assist with general health and should be a component of any health maintenance program. Recommendation: 1 tablet at morning ​ Water: Water is absolutely necessary for every cellular function. In addition, "The Protocol" integrates many different supplements, which can be somewhat taxing on the body to process and eliminate out of the body when more is taken in than needed. Water assists the kidneys, liver, and lymph nodes in regulating toxins out of the body as well. Enough can not be said about intaking enough water. Recommendation: 8 ounces every 2 hours Labs: Because everyone processes supplements and nutrition differently to some degree, it is important to note side effects that you may experience and adjust accordingly. In addition, examining kidney and liver health during this protocol at least every three months is considered best practice. If you already have kidney and/or liver issues, please exercise extra caution when introducing more supplements to your daily intake. Sometimes it makes sense to add things gradually and in small amounts, to see how your body reacts. Recommendation: Labs once every three months for kidney and liver functions. Lastly, consider eating healthier and minimizing exposure to toxins known to be correlated with Parkinson's disease. In addition, "The Protocol" is not an inexpensive option. It may be worth considering it for a few months and see if it provides results. Many are ok with spending hundreds of dollars a month on a house or car, but not on their health. It is all about priorities and discipline. Better health, better life.
  8. Hi, We would greatly appreciate your input on a treatment plan that another member has posted relating to treatments; the plan is entirely holistic (composed of of supplements, vitamins, etc). The member has self-reported great success with this plan. It does beg a few questions: 1) Are any of these supplements inherently dangerous, either in isolation or in combination. Of course, the efficacy of any supplement are based on individual circumstances, but are there common risks that should be discussed? 2) Are any of these supplements extraneous or redundant 3) Is there a titration protocol that should be added to this plan? 3) Is there a foundation for these supplements having the benefits described? Here is the link to the string in our "Young Onset" unmoderated forum. http://forum.parkinson.org/index.php?/topic/17676-for-me-pd-became-a-choice-maybe-it-is-for-you-too/%C2'> For convenience, I have extracted the plan of supplements below. Thanks so much for your input. Clinoptilolite Recommendation: Take two tablespoons at bedtime, at least one hour after any supplements or medications have been taken. Do this on for one month and then off for one month. Continue this cycle. Coenzyme Q10 Recommendation: 800mg at morning, 400mg at lunch, 400mg at evening, and 400mg at bedtime. (adjust slowly if it upsets stomach) Reishi Recommendation: 540mg at morning, 540mg at lunch, and 540mg at evening B Vitamins (Lypo-Spheric - Fully Active) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Glutathione (GSH) (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Lipoic Acid (R-ALA) (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Vitamin C (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes NAC Recommendation: 600mg at lunch, and 600mg at bedtime L-Tyrosine Recommendation: 500mg at lunch, 500mg at evening and 500mg at bedtime Vitamin D3 Recommendation: 5000iu at morning Astaxanthin Recommendation: 4mg at morning, 4mg at lunch, 4mg at evening and 4mg at bedtime Omega 3 Recommendation: 500 EPA/250 DHA, morning, noon, evening, and bedtime Chaga (Dihydroxybenzalacetone) Recommendation: 350mg at morning, 350mg at evening and 350mg at bedtime Horse Chestnut (Triterpenoids) Recommendation: 350mg at lunch, and 350mg at bedtime Green Tea (GTPs) Recommendation: 400mg at evening Resveratrol Recommendation: 200mg at lunch, and 200mg at bedtime Amino Acids (Complete Complex) Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, 4 capsules at evening Iron (Gentle Iron Recommended) Recommendation: 25mg at bedtime L-Carnosine Recommendation: 500mg at morning, 500mg at lunch, and 500mg at evening L-Carnitine Recommendation: 500mg at lunch PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline Quinone): Recommendation: 20mg at evening Curcumin: Recommendation: 630mg at lunch 5 HTP: Recommendation: 200mg before bedtime MK-7; VItamin K-2: Recommendation: 100 mcg at breakfast Probiotic: Recommendation: 1 capsule before bedtime Caffeine: Recommendation: 200mg to 400mg per day, preferably not after 3pm and not in the form of sugary drinks. Increase dosage slowly. DHEA (7-Keto): Recommendation: 100mg at morning (male) 25mg at morning (female) Multi-Mineral Support: Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, and 4 capsules at bedtime High Quality Multi-Vitamin Support: Recommendation: 1 dosage at morning
  9. I have not had any PD symptoms for over 4 months. I am no longer on any medication. I also feel like I am 20 again. Perhaps you can too... I often say now I don't have any choice whether or not I have Parkinson's, but surrounding that non-choice is a million other choices that I can make. -Michael J. Fox Maybe it is a choice? Sleep Recommendation: Minimum of 8.5 hours of quality sleep per day. Wake up naturally instead of with an alarm. If your body needs more sleep, then let it sleep. Exercise Recommendation: Minimum of 20 minutes of cardio 3 times per week (60-80% maximum heart rate). Full body resistance training once per week, or divided into muscle groups throughout the week. Stress Management Recommendation: Identify consistent and predictable stress in your life and work to minimize environmental stressors and when not possible, at minimum, learn how to control your reaction to such stress in the most positive way. Clinoptilolite Recommendation: Take two tablespoons at bedtime, at least one hour after any supplements or medications have been taken. Do this on for one month and then off for one month. Continue this cycle. Coenzyme Q10 Recommendation: 800mg at morning, 400mg at lunch, 400mg at evening, and 400mg at bedtime. (adjust slowly if it upsets stomach) Reishi Recommendation: 540mg at morning, 540mg at lunch, and 540mg at evening B Vitamins (Lypo-Spheric - Fully Active) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Glutathione (GSH) (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Lipoic Acid (R-ALA) (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes Vitamin C (Lypo-Spheric) Recommendation: Take 1 packet at morning on an empty stomach. Do not eat for 15 minutes NAC Recommendation: 600mg at lunch, and 600mg at bedtime L-Tyrosine Recommendation: 500mg at lunch, 500mg at evening and 500mg at bedtime Vitamin D3 Recommendation: 5000iu at morning Astaxanthin Recommendation: 4mg at morning, 4mg at lunch, 4mg at evening and 4mg at bedtime Omega 3 Recommendation: 500 EPA/250 DHA, morning, noon, evening, and bedtime Chaga (Dihydroxybenzalacetone) Recommendation: 350mg at morning, 350mg at evening and 350mg at bedtime Horse Chestnut (Triterpenoids) Recommendation: 350mg at lunch, and 350mg at bedtime Green Tea (GTPs) Recommendation: 400mg at evening Resveratrol Recommendation: 200mg at lunch, and 200mg at bedtime Amino Acids (Complete Complex) Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, 4 capsules at evening Iron (Gentle Iron Recommended) Recommendation: 25mg at bedtime L-Carnosine Recommendation: 500mg at morning, 500mg at lunch, and 500mg at evening L-Carnitine Recommendation: 500mg at lunch PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline Quinone): Recommendation: 20mg at evening Curcumin: Recommendation: 630mg at lunch 5 HTP: Recommendation: 200mg before bedtime MK-7; VItamin K-2: Recommendation: 100 mcg at breakfast Probiotic: Recommendation: 1 capsule before bedtime Caffeine: Recommendation: 200mg to 400mg per day, preferably not after 3pm and not in the form of sugary drinks. Increase dosage slowly. DHEA (7-Keto): Recommendation: 100mg at morning (male) 25mg at morning (female) Multi-Mineral Support: Recommendation: 4 capsules at morning, and 4 capsules at bedtime High Quality Multi-Vitamin Support: Recommendation: 1 dosage at morning All of this is backed by a collection of clinical research. So far, there is no "magic pill" for PD...but, maybe "magic pills" If you try this for 3 months, please let me know how it went for you.
  10. Will this make us a more informed shopper, or is it just more "stuff" to ignore on package labels? You be the judge. FDA PROPOSES OVERHAUL OF NUTRITIONAL FACTS ON LABELING Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLPRobert G. Hibbert, Anthony "Tony" Pavel and Heather A. DorseyUSAMarch 7 2014Author The first major overhaul of the Nutrition Facts panel in more than 20 years focuses on serving sizes, calories, and a refreshed design.The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) on February 27 announced (1) the forthcoming publication of two proposed rules designed to overhaul Nutrition Facts labeling: “Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels” (2) and “Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed at One-Eating Occasion; Dual Column Labling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Certain Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed; Serving Size for Breath Mints; and Technical Amendments.” (3) The proposals were published in theFederal Register on March 3, 2014.BackgroundThe Nutrition Facts label was first introduced more than 20 years ago through the implementation of the Nutrition and Education Labeling Act (NLEA) and, according to FDA, is in need of a complete makeover. FDA lists three main categories of changes in the rules: those based upon new understanding of nutrition science, those reflecting updated serving size requirements and package-specific requirements, and those implementing a refreshed design. (4) Through these changes, FDA aims to change food packaging to reflect advances in public health initiatives, including those on obesity, chronic diseases, and scientific information, which is reflected by the removal and addition of certain vitamins and minerals from the Nutrition Facts label. (5) FDA states that the goal of the revamping of the Nutrition Facts label is not to tell people what to eat, but rather to provide better information to consumers so they can make informed choices. (6) Further, FDA states that the benefits of this change outweigh the costs, estimating that the one-time labeling change will cost industry approximately $2.3 billion, while the cumulative benefits over 20 years will average between $21.1 to $31.4 billion. (7)What Is Being Removed from the Label?In total, under the proposed rule, Vitamins A and C, “Calories from Fat,” and the footnote table that lists reference values for both 2,000- and 2,500-calorie diets would be removed from the Nutrition Facts panel.Vitamins A and C would no longer be required to be listed on the Nutrition Facts panel. FDA states that data shows that Vitamin A and C deficiencies are uncommon. ( The Agency reached this conclusion after examining data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). (9) Rather than requiring Vitamins A and C to be displayed on the Nutrition Facts panel, FDA will permit manufacturers to list them if they so choose.FDA is also proposing to remove the listing of “Calories from Fat.” In the proposed rule, FDA states that “current science supports a view that the type of fat is more relevant than the overall total fat intake in increased risk of chronic diseases.” (10) Further, the Agency states that removal of “Calories from Fat” will not have an effect on consumers’ ability to determine a food’s “healthfulness.”The requirement for the footnote table that lists the reference values for certain nutrients for 2,000- and 2,500-calorie diets will also be removed. FDA will perform consumer research to determine whether this change will affect consumers’ understanding of the Nutrition Facts label. (11) What Is Being Added to the Label?Listings of “Added Sugars,” potassium, and Vitamin D would be new requirements under the proposed rule.“Total Carbs” would replace “Total Carbohydrates” to reflect the term commonly used and understood by consumers. “Sugars” would be listed under “Total Carbs,” and a new category, “Added Sugars,” would appear indented under the “Sugars” listing. FDA states that, on average, American consumers eat 16% of their daily calories from sugars that are added during food production. (12) Thus, the new listing of “Added Sugars” aims to raise consumer awareness about the extra sugars that appear in foods.Two more additions to the Nutrition Facts panel would be potassium and Vitamin D. FDA states that Vitamin D is important for healthy bones, especially for women and the elderly. (13) Potassium can lower blood pressure and prevent hypertension. FDA analyzed data from NHANES and determined that the average consumer was not consuming enough of these nutrients to protect against chronic diseases, and thus Potassium and Vitamin D would be added to the Nutrition Facts. (14) Other ChangesUnder the proposed rule, the calorie count would be the most prominent feature of the label, allowing the reader to quickly and easily identify the calories per serving. The prominence of the serving size per container would also increase, as it would be the first information presented on the Nutrition Facts label. Further, to make the serving-size information more accessible to the average consumer, it would be listed in household measures such as “2/3 cup.”Finally, and significantly, the serving sizes would be changed to more accurately reflect what consumers customarily consume. FDA set the current reference values (Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed, or RACCs) based on eating habits analyzed in studies conducted in 1977–1978 and 1987–1988.15 Because people generally consume more now than they did when these studies were conducted, the RACCs would be updated to reflect this change. Serving sizes are based on RACCs, and thus manufacturers would need to adjust serving sizes. FDA proposed that some food products that were labeled as more than one serving be labeled as one serving because consumers typically eat or drink them in one sitting. FDA lists examples of these products, including a 24-ounce can of soda, a 10.5-ounce frozen entrée, a 19-ounce can of soup, and a pint of ice cream.16FDA also proposed an alternative visual format for the Nutrition Facts panel. The alternative format utilizes three headings to organize nutrient levels and help consumers access information. First, “Quick Facts” lists the amount of total carbs, fat, and protein. Second, “Avoid Too Much” points out nutrients, such as fat, cholesterol, sodium, and sugar, that should be consumed in moderation. Third, “Get Enough” lists fiber and various vitamins. FDA is requesting comments on how these alternative headings may improve consumers’ understanding of the nutritional value of a product.17 While the proposal does not address Front-of-Pack labeling, the alternate format of the proposed Nutrition Facts panel may provide some hint of future directions with its use of “Avoid Too Much” and “Get Enough” language. FDA’s Front-of-Package Labeling Initiative has not seen significant movement since its announcement in 2009 by Dr. Hamburg.If finalized, the proposed rules would be applicable to all nonexempt food products that fall within FDA’s jurisdiction. Meat, poultry, and processed egg products regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service are not covered, but USDA has informally stated that it is contemplating similar action.The proposed rules will be open for public comment for 90 days. Any final rules will become effective 60 days after the date of publication. Manufacturers will have two years to be in compliance after the final effective date.
  11. No spicy food

    My husband used to tolerate spicy food, but now he says no to any spicy food for fear of the acid reflux, one of many PD side effects. Is that what you experience too?
  12. Meals and Levodopa effect

    I have a problem I've never heard from others. I take extreme care of the intervals between L-dopa intakes(usually a on effect of 2 hours) and its proximity to meals(minimal of 30 minutes before them). But incredibly the effect of L-dopa drops to a complete off state as soon as I finish a meal(+/-15 minutes). Even when the meal has zero protein my state wears off imediatelly. I have tried different situations such as starting the meal just after the dopa takes effect - but the effect goes down in a few minutes. I also added by doc recomendation entacapone both with the previous and post meals intakes. But it did noit work also. Is it particular to me?? Suggestions?
  13. Registered Dietition

    How does one go about finding a registered dietition who has worked with Parkinson's patients?
  14. I recently came across a book titled "Natural Therapies for Parkinson's Disease" by Laurie Mischley. Has a number of recommendations. Before I embark on implementing some of her recommendations I would like to know if you have reviewed this book and if so wherel can I find it?
  15. Hi Kathrynne, After purchasing the PDF of your Eat Well, Stay Well with Parkinson's Disease and reading through it, I was surprised my the amount of detailed information your were able to coordinate about diet and its effects on various Parkinson's treatments. I'm eager to apply that information in the on-going development of my father's care plan, but there are a number of questions that I still have and was hoping you might be able to help with. I'm posting this as a new topic here in the hope that other forum users might have answers to some of my questions as well. Let me jump right in! 1. As I mentioned above, your book Eat Well, Stay Well with Parkinson's is quite impressive but also a little intimidating. I would be very interested to meet with a nutritionalist who has experience developing meal plans for patients with Parkinson's Disease, however I have not yet been able to locate any myself. Do you (or any of the forum users) know of nutritionalist that would fit this bill? 2. One of the other questions that I had with regard to your recommendations is as follows: Often in the book you'll write something like "some people have different protein resistances" when discussing the spectrum of carb : protein (5:1 - 9:1), how exactly would this be evaluated? In other words, how are we to determine what the optimal ratio is for a given person? Particularly when much of the processes your referencing (intestine -> blood, blood -> brain) happen internally, I'm left wondering how to make these judgements that seem so central to a successful application of your information. Thanks! Dave
  16. Swallowing and Diet

    Many people with Parkinson disease experience some difficulty with eating. Multiple aspects of eating are important. Diet is about what you eat and drink to maintain hydration and nutrition. Registered dieticians are the experts in this area. Other important aspects of eating are concerned with the consistency of foods that you eat and how to swallow them safely to maximize safe and efficient swallowing. Speech-language pathologists are the experts in these areas. We welcome your questions, concerns and comments on this website regarding swallowing or diet consistency or how to take pills safely. Looking forward to hearing from you. Please let us know about any topics that you would like us to write about in forum posts. Sincerely, Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP
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