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Found 8 results

  1. Of Possible Interest

    A new (May, 2017) peer-reviewed PubMed Norwegian Parkinson’s Study supporting the infectious cause of Parkinson's: Berstad and Berstad: "Parkinson’s disease; the hibernating spore hypothesis" http://www.medical-hypotheses.com/article/S0306-9877(17)30077-4/pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28673590
  2. Question regarding symptoms

    Hello Sir/Madam, My name is Karthik Ramaraju, I'm 26 years old. Today I had an unusual feeling of eye twitching. It was started one week before. So when I googled it, I found eye twitching categorized under Parkinson's Disease. I think I'm also having other symptoms which are mentioned in one of the website. The symptoms are, 1. Resting tremor - A little shaking of hands is there since long time. 2. Orthostatic hypotension - It happened for me 2 times. I think It will happen when I'm affected by cold. 3. Eye twitching/Vision problem - The eye twitching came recently. But I have loss of vision also since I'm working in front of monitor always. 4. Cognitive issue - I can say I think more slowly 5. Aching neck - My neck at back side always ache when I sit. I fear now that I may be also victim of Parkinson's disease. Please help me in what steps I need to take further? Thanks and Regards, Karthik Ramaraju
  3. Got Milk?

    Interesting article here possibly linking pesticide found in milk in the 1980's to Parkinson's disease. Neurology Journal Abstract here.
  4. PD Positive Deviants

    I am participating in a 5 year Parkinson's Disease study, entitled CAM Care in PD. CAM is an abbreviation for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The premise of this study is that "that in every community there are certain individuals or groups (the positive deviants), whose uncommon but successful behaviors or strategies enable them to find better solutions to a problem than their peers. These individuals or groups have access to exactly the same resources and face the same challenges and obstacles as their peers." The study overview says "Parkinson's Disease is often said to be an incurable, progressive, and degenerative disease. It is our hypothesis that some of you do not, or will not, have a progressive disease. The goal of this PD study is to collect as much data as possible over a five-year period with the hope of finding dietary and lifestyle factors associated with a slower disease progression." It is my observation that in addition to positive deviants, there are Parkinson's Disease Negative deviants - those that are diagnosed with PD and talk themselves into almost immediately being totally disabled. Are you a PD positive deviant? A PD negative deviant? Just along for the ride? What could you do to put yourself in the positive deviant group?
  5. Let Us Not Be The Forgotten Ones

    Happy new year to all! You're favorite pharmacist is back for another year behind the intergalactic pharmacy bench and is ready to answer you're questions. First off, I would like to clean up some old business. A friend of mine from across the pond, Miss Lisa Vanderberg, sent me this Public Service announcement that has been circulating around. I have seen it, I like it, it is to the point, and it is true. I hate to say this but, many of the donors that put money into the NPF, or other Parkinson's organizations, are people who either have PD or know someone who has PD. My challenge is simple. So simple it hurts that I did not think of it earlier. How many people heard about the girl who sold Girl Scout Cookies outside of a legal medical marijuana dispensary? Was that a no brainer or what. Now, I am neither condemning nor condoning the use of marijuana, what I am doing is applauding the entrepreneurial skills of this girl. BRAVO! Now we, meaning us with Parkinson's, are kind of tired of chipping into our own till all the time to help "us." If you think of it, we already are putting our money in the till. We pay for Dr visits to a Parkinson's Dr, we pay for Parkinson's medication, we pay for things to help us around the house (canes, lift chairs, special beds, holders for the bath tub, etc). My challenge is this: I would like for everyone out there who belongs to a non-Parkinson's organization, to get just 1 person to donate $1 to the NPF. This way we are going outside of our group to get help for us and for you. Below is the link to the service announcement. Please, copy and paste it and send it to the other organizations you are in, you can even include it with you're emails, or if you know someone who owns a company, have them put this on their outgoing email. I know we can do this. We are off to battle Parkinson's Disease, and I would bring everyone of you with me. Why? Because you are strong, you persevere, you are head strong, and you are fighters. The best part is, we do it every day of our life. In fact while I was writing this, my insurance agent called, and I figured I would throw it by him. I figure, I give him money, the least he can do is donate $1. I walked him through the steps to get to site and where to donate, and BANG....we just got $10 bucks. It's time to fight for us, so copy this link below, and feel free to pass along you're success stories. Heck, pass along any story that worked. Let's get it on people! The challenge starts now, and does not stop. Good luck!
  6. Happy new year to all! You're favorite pharmacist is back for another year behind the intergalactic pharmacy bench and is ready to answer you're questions. First off, I would like to clean up some old business. A friend of mine from across the pond, Miss Lisa Vanderberg, sent me this Public Service announcement that has been circulating around. I have seen it, I like it, it is to the point, and it is true. I hate to say this but, many of the donors that put money into the NPF, or other Parkinson's organizations, are people who either have PD or know someone who has PD. My challenge is simple. So simple it hurts that I did not think of it earlier. How many people heard about the girl who sold Girl Scout Cookies outside of a legal medical marijuana dispensary? Was that a no brainer or what. Now, I am neither condemning nor condoning the use of marijuana, what I am doing is applauding the entrepreneurial skills of this girl. BRAVO! Now we, meaning us with Parkinson's, are kind of tired of chipping into our own till all the time to help "us." If you think of it, we already are putting our money in the till. We pay for Dr visits to a Parkinson's Dr, we pay for Parkinson's medication, we pay for things to help us around the house (canes, lift chairs, special beds, holders for the bath tub, etc). My challenge is this: I would like for everyone out there who belongs to a non-Parkinson's organization, to get just 1 person to donate $1 to the NPF. This way we are going outside of our group to get help for us and for you. Below is the link to the service announcement. Please, copy and paste it and send it to the other organizations you are in, you can even include it with you're emails, or if you know someone who owns a company, have them put this on their outgoing email. I know we can do this. We are off to battle Parkinson's Disease, and I would bring everyone of you with me. Why? Because you are strong, you persevere, you are head strong, and you are fighters. The best part is, we do it every day of our life. In fact while I was writing this, my insurance agent called, and I figured I would throw it by him. I figure, I give him money, the least he can do is donate $1. I walked him through the steps to get to site and where to donate, and BANG....we just got $10 bucks. It's time to fight for us, so copy this link below, and feel free to pass along you're success stories. Heck, pass along any story that worked. Let's get it on people! The challenge starts now, and does not stop. Good luck! https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/we-forgotten-patients-lisa-vanderburg
  7. Today I would like to begin answering this question based on my own personal experiences. I would also like to initiate dialog with people whose lives have been affected by these disorders and people who have actively searched for answers to this question. I became a biophysicist because I wanted to define the magic of life with mathematical models. Finding treatments for diseases was not something I had ever given much serious thought to. Then, within a few years, several eye-opening events took place and changed my views on what was important in my work. Early on, I lost a young colleague to a heart condition. My colleague’s death was a devastating loss not only for me but for everyone who knew him. It was an even more devastating loss for his family, because he was the fourth of five brothers succumbing to the same heart ailment. I, however, was certain that modern medicine had done everything it could do to save my colleague’s life. After all, my colleague had three heart surgeries and several devices implanted. Furthermore, his father was a physician, and I was positive he had uncovered all medical treatments that could save his son’s life. A few years had gone by, and I hadn’t given much thought to my colleague’s heart condition. Then, as I was settling into a new position, preparing my lectures for medical students, I came across some astonishing information. One of the topics I was assigned to cover was channelopathies. Channelopathies are disorders caused by defects in the structure and function of different ion channels. The ion channels are signaling molecules in the cell membrane that allow neighboring cells to communicate with each other. As I was reviewing the scientific literature, I came across studies that had identified my colleague’s heart condition. Had the cardiologists who treated my colleague read the same studies, they would have known that some of the devices they implanted did not benefit my colleague, but rather that they contributed to his death. At this point, I realized that what I do and learn as a biophysicist can translate into effective treatments for some of the most devastating disorders. At the same time, I recognized the presence of the dangerous gap between scientific research and current medicine even when the two target the same medical condition. One cannot help but wonder how many lives are lost in this gap. One thing for sure, I constantly wondered about the toll this gap had on many human lives. Therefore three years ago when we discovered a vast signaling network in the brain that controls motion and cognition, we went into overdrive to characterize this network. We established that current medications that slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease work through this same network. Furthermore, we found ways to enhance the effects of such medications. Finally, we established that the progression of Parkinson’s disease and the escalation of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia are results of the deterioration of this brain network. However, when I tried to publish the results of our work and make this knowledge available to the entire scientific community, I was stopped by anonymous reviewers of our work. Scientific publishing is a difficult process – every scientist is well aware of this fact. My initial reaction was to provide all additional data requested by the reviewers in order to have our discovery published so that the floodgates of development of new treatments for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases would open. Two years later, I realized that our critics would never be satisfied with our data because our work has nothing to do with the established theory of neurodegeneration and formation of amyloid plaques in the brain. In response, I formed Cognistrata Inc. (www.cognistrata.org) with the mission to translate our scientific discovery into new treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. I also decided to turn directly for financial help to the families whose lives are affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. In my next blog entry I will explain why no one was able to discover this brain network before we stumbled upon it. But first, I would like to initiate a dialog and hear directly from you. Does it matter to you who will develop effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease? Would you support a woman biophysicist in her quest to find such treatments? Does it matter to you that most of the work that enabled us to discover the brain network was done in the heart? Or you would rather support the road well-traveled and the $400 million a year money pit focused on amyloid plaques research? I would like to hear your voice and your thoughts publicly or privately (just press the Contact us button at www.cognistrata.org). Thank you. Tatyana Ivanova-Nikolova, Ph.D. Principal Investigator and President of Cognistrata Inc.
  8. PD CME Opportunity

    Caring for a person with Parkinson’s can be challenging. As motor skills decline, simple tasks may become more difficult. Patients with Parkinson’s disease may progressively struggle to be independent. The main focus of our program is to address the gaps in knowledge and enhance the existing level of care. For more information about this online neurology CME activity and to register, please visit http://www.pdcme.com or give us a call at 855-276-6855.
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