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Found 13 results

  1. Hello, This is my first post. I have enjoyed reading and educating myself on here. I was just diganosed in May 2017. I year ago I was diagnosed with Hypo Aldosertonism (rare Kydney disease). For the longest time, I blamed my symptoms on that but my levels were good. I was sent to a nuerologist and after several clinical test and an adnormal Dat scan I was diagnosed with YOPD at 43. I am on Ropinorole extended release, started me out with 2mg for a week, then 4 for a week, now 6 for this week. and 8mg next week. Is this an average dose? what should I expect? My symptoms are: extreme fatique, inconsistent tremor in right hand, slowness on right side, and I also shake upper body-(more on right side) when Yawning, I get extremely sore all over and especially in neck and back. I jerk and shake all night long about every 45 sec or so, resulting in no sleep. I guess what I am trying to ask is what do I look for? Medicene has helped sleep and shakiness some but still have symptoms come and go. Is all of this normal? thanks for you time...Stu
  2. Cannabis is legal in my state . If there any benefits for using it with PD? I see how it could change your mood.
  3. pain meds

    dr. orkin, i see my regular dr. and neurologist twice a year, unless i have an issue. i won't see them again until may ( it is a 2 plus hour drive.....so i avoid it because of my PD exhaustion ). i wonder if you could answer a question for me ? i take norco for my different pain situations ( fibromyalgia for example ), and find that i can all of a sudden, get up and get things done after i take them, where i am too tired before. i avoid stimulants, because they bring out my PD symptoms like crazy ( i am on mirapex for both, and sinemet for PD, which has been a miracle ). i wonder why the pain med. makes me get up and get so many things done. it is a godsend, but i can't make the connection. why does pain medicine, after it kicks in, get me up and helps me get many things done. i wish i could take more, but that would just cause addiction problems etc. can you tell me why i all of a sudden find myself cleaning house, doing dishes, organizing, all the things i barely get done sans pain meds. why do they have this effect ? i would appreciate knowing why this happens..........if you have an answer off the top of your head. i find it curious. thank you, lu states
  4. Hi I am New here. Excuse my English. About a year ago I was involved in a bike accident I lost my concuse for short time and was injured severelly. I was hospetolized and went through 2 surgeries one in my lungs Who was punctured and another one in my shoulder Who was crushed. All together I was hospetolized for a month. From day one I was wallking very slowly and had an uncontrolable tremor on my right foot. It looked like a normal recovery both to my wife and the staff. It went on at home but stil we thought that they were all a part of recovery specially because I was under heavy pain keelers Inc opiats. After 2 to 3 month my wife forced me to go and get checked. To cut a long story short I was diagnosed with PD. I Did not have any symptoms what So ever before the accident. I am sure that the accident was the treager for the eamerging of the PD. I would appreciate very much if the doctor could reply and share his thought and his expirence regarding cases like the ebove. And if there another way to ask the Dr please lets me know and instruct me. Tnx a lot.
  5. Virtigo with fluctuating BP

    Sir, I am Animesh Kundu writing from Nachipur, Hooghly ,West Bengal, India. My father Sri Sambhunath Kundu Age 67 Years suffering from PD last 20 Years. He is currently under treatment of Dr P. Chakraborty MD (Gen Med) MD (Neuro) Ex Fellow- The National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery, London, Member of American Academy of Neurology at Kolkata India. He has a mild brain stroke in last July. His current medication is going on is : Syndopa Plus (125) : 4 Tab/day Ropark 0.5 : 2 Tab/day Syndopa CR (250) : 2 Tab/day Preva 75mg : 1 Tab/day Tonact TG : 1 Tab/day Roliflo OD 4mg : 1Tab/day Floricot 0.1mg : 1 Tab/day Currently He is facing following difficulties: 1) Virtigo almost all over day, sometimes little sometimes heavy. Reported to Dr P.Chakraborty and as per his advice I have measured BP with the help of Omron BP Monitor and found as under: By Sitdown : 76/114 After five minutes By Sitdown : 91/153 After one minutes By Standing: 78/120 After one minutes By Sitdown : 90/157 After one minutes By Standing: 82/137 After five minutes By Sitdown : 80/8135 Then doctor advised Floricot 0.1mg 1/2 Tab/day then after seven days 1 tab/per day. But till date he has fluctuating BP and problem of virtigo. 2) Sometimes he has feeling forceful bending down towards front. He has taking Ropark 0.5 : 2 Tab/day but still sometimes it occurs. 3) Sometimes he is feeling inflammation all over the body. Please advice how to rid of these problems.
  6. Let Us Not Be The Forgotten Ones

    Happy new year to all! You're favorite pharmacist is back for another year behind the intergalactic pharmacy bench and is ready to answer you're questions. First off, I would like to clean up some old business. A friend of mine from across the pond, Miss Lisa Vanderberg, sent me this Public Service announcement that has been circulating around. I have seen it, I like it, it is to the point, and it is true. I hate to say this but, many of the donors that put money into the NPF, or other Parkinson's organizations, are people who either have PD or know someone who has PD. My challenge is simple. So simple it hurts that I did not think of it earlier. How many people heard about the girl who sold Girl Scout Cookies outside of a legal medical marijuana dispensary? Was that a no brainer or what. Now, I am neither condemning nor condoning the use of marijuana, what I am doing is applauding the entrepreneurial skills of this girl. BRAVO! Now we, meaning us with Parkinson's, are kind of tired of chipping into our own till all the time to help "us." If you think of it, we already are putting our money in the till. We pay for Dr visits to a Parkinson's Dr, we pay for Parkinson's medication, we pay for things to help us around the house (canes, lift chairs, special beds, holders for the bath tub, etc). My challenge is this: I would like for everyone out there who belongs to a non-Parkinson's organization, to get just 1 person to donate $1 to the NPF. This way we are going outside of our group to get help for us and for you. Below is the link to the service announcement. Please, copy and paste it and send it to the other organizations you are in, you can even include it with you're emails, or if you know someone who owns a company, have them put this on their outgoing email. I know we can do this. We are off to battle Parkinson's Disease, and I would bring everyone of you with me. Why? Because you are strong, you persevere, you are head strong, and you are fighters. The best part is, we do it every day of our life. In fact while I was writing this, my insurance agent called, and I figured I would throw it by him. I figure, I give him money, the least he can do is donate $1. I walked him through the steps to get to site and where to donate, and BANG....we just got $10 bucks. It's time to fight for us, so copy this link below, and feel free to pass along you're success stories. Heck, pass along any story that worked. Let's get it on people! The challenge starts now, and does not stop. Good luck!
  7. Happy new year to all! You're favorite pharmacist is back for another year behind the intergalactic pharmacy bench and is ready to answer you're questions. First off, I would like to clean up some old business. A friend of mine from across the pond, Miss Lisa Vanderberg, sent me this Public Service announcement that has been circulating around. I have seen it, I like it, it is to the point, and it is true. I hate to say this but, many of the donors that put money into the NPF, or other Parkinson's organizations, are people who either have PD or know someone who has PD. My challenge is simple. So simple it hurts that I did not think of it earlier. How many people heard about the girl who sold Girl Scout Cookies outside of a legal medical marijuana dispensary? Was that a no brainer or what. Now, I am neither condemning nor condoning the use of marijuana, what I am doing is applauding the entrepreneurial skills of this girl. BRAVO! Now we, meaning us with Parkinson's, are kind of tired of chipping into our own till all the time to help "us." If you think of it, we already are putting our money in the till. We pay for Dr visits to a Parkinson's Dr, we pay for Parkinson's medication, we pay for things to help us around the house (canes, lift chairs, special beds, holders for the bath tub, etc). My challenge is this: I would like for everyone out there who belongs to a non-Parkinson's organization, to get just 1 person to donate $1 to the NPF. This way we are going outside of our group to get help for us and for you. Below is the link to the service announcement. Please, copy and paste it and send it to the other organizations you are in, you can even include it with you're emails, or if you know someone who owns a company, have them put this on their outgoing email. I know we can do this. We are off to battle Parkinson's Disease, and I would bring everyone of you with me. Why? Because you are strong, you persevere, you are head strong, and you are fighters. The best part is, we do it every day of our life. In fact while I was writing this, my insurance agent called, and I figured I would throw it by him. I figure, I give him money, the least he can do is donate $1. I walked him through the steps to get to site and where to donate, and BANG....we just got $10 bucks. It's time to fight for us, so copy this link below, and feel free to pass along you're success stories. Heck, pass along any story that worked. Let's get it on people! The challenge starts now, and does not stop. Good luck! https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/we-forgotten-patients-lisa-vanderburg
  8. Fuctuating Symptoms

    My husband has been having fluctuating LBD symptoms. They seem to come during stressful times in his life. He has mostly good times. He is an outgoing, busy man, always working in his shop, going for walks with the dogs, etc. Sometimes he complains about having "heavy legs" where he can't seem to take another step. He forces his way through them. He's a 70 year old former Marine so he says he is too tough to have Parkinsons. He won't tell me when he's having difficulty. I do notice when he gets tired and standing he leans at odd angles against the counter. He doesn't have tremors. My question is, can Parkinson's have fluctuating symptoms too? He doesn't always have heavy legs. He does have minor symptoms like dandruff on his right eyebrow, oily skin, red flushing on face, diarrhea, runny nose. I'm not even sure those are connected to PD, but I have read that they are. My question is, can Parkinson's have fluctuating symptoms too? He doesn't always have heavy legs.
  9. My father (aged 82) has advanced PD, first diagnosed in 2006. Starting in 2011, his symptoms progressed into dementia. By the end of 2011, he was no longer able to function independently (e.g., driving) and has since consistently declined. After initial hallucinations (e.g., flutters and little bugs), he began seeing imaginary people and having delusional thoughts (e.g., characters in TV shows becoming family members). To combat this, over 3 years, we began administering more Sinemet, introduced Sinemet CR during the day, added Azilect and Seroquel. Though his mental capacity had severely diminished, this combination kept him from having too many off times and kept him relatively mobile -- but introduced a new problem: hyperactivity and mania. In one such manic state, when my father had too much energy, and was he fell on the foyer floor and broke his hip. Since then, he had surgery and a partial hip replacement. Recovery was slow and difficult, resulting in a stay at a nursing home for 2 months and a return to home on father's day. Since his initial injury, he dislocated his hip twice, forcing additional anesthesia and procedures to re-insert the hip. Since then, he has been placed under extreme precaution - he uses a hip brace 24-7, sits in his wheelchair, and goes up and down the stairs once per day through a chair lift. My father's manic behavior subsided in the 4 months or so from the time he was injured to now. But recently, he has started having these episodes again. With so much energy and lack of concentration, he is jeopardizing his health - trying to get up and walk even though he cannot do so, contorting his body in ways that violate rules of his hip replacement and risk re-injury, and resisting attempts to help and guide him from my family and our full-time caregiver. At this point in his life, I think it's best that his mobility be limited given that his hyperactivity contributed to his initial injury and continues to pose a threat to his well-being. Although down times are difficult for him, it may be a lesser evil than having him happily manic. Would you please review his current list of medications and suggest your changes? I think we can reduce his Sinemet by half every other dose, but I fear that he will have such low times that he will be constantly depressed and in a vegetable state. Another option I have researched is to remove Azilect... seemingly with a similar risk of increased low times: 7 am Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab Levothyroxine – 1 tab Sucralfate 1GM- 1 tab 10 am Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab Azilect 1mg - 1 tab Allegra (Aller-Fex) 180 mg– 1 tab After shower/cleansing EXELON 9.5mg/24 hr patch 11 am Nexium 40 mg– 1 cap Amlodipine Besylate 5 mg – 1 tab 1 pm Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab Quetiapine Fumarate (Seroquel) 25 mg–1 tab Crestor 5mg – 1 tab Allopurinol 100 mg- 1 tab Sucralfate 1GM- 1 tab 4 pm Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab Venlafaxine 37.5 mg– 1 cap 7 pm Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab 8 pm MultiVitamin – 1 caplet Vitamin D 2000– 1 cap CoQ10 200mg– 1 cap Vitron C – 1 tab 10 pm Sinemet 25/100 mg - 1 tab Quetiapine Fumarate (Seroquel) 25 mg–1 tab Aspirin 81mg – 1 tab Pepcid 40 mg– 1 tab Sucralfate 1GM- 1 tab
  10. Cognitive Changes

    Hello. My husband is 70 years old, a Vietnam Veteran and up until the last year has been very healthy and active. He does have Type II diabetes and high blood pressure. His VA doctor says his diabetes is a result of his exposure to Agent Orange. We have been aware that Parkinsons Disease sometimes is linked to Agent Orange. In the past months I have noticed some changes in his health that I read might be early signs of Parkinsons. He has had a sleep disorder for years. At first it was just PTSD flashback dreams only occurring at certain times of the year. But for at least 3 years he suffers from REM Sleep Disorder Behavior. It ranges in severity from just rigid, tight, stiff arms and legs to full blown yelling, kicking, hitting, jumping out of bed and into walls type of dreams. He has had more memory problems lately, and has a very confused look on his fact when he realizes he can’t find something. He’s more serious looking, often staring into space. Also while on a driving vacation, he mentioned he feels his peripheral vision is different. Once he pulled off the road on the wrong side of a stop sign to turn left. He was confused and didn’t know why he did it when I asked. He is also depressed. The only physical signs of Parkinsons are what he describes as “heavy legs.” This seems to come and go. Because these symptoms come and go, he feels they are only caused by stress. (We do have a lot of stress in our life now, that will be resolved in a month.) He doesn’t want to go to the doctor for them. Should I insist on a check up, or wait and see? Thank you, Worried Wife
  11. How is PD effecting You TODAY?

    How is PD effecting your life today? So far, as of 7am, PD has had very little effect on me. I've taken my Mirapex and I feel pretty good (in stark contrast to yesterday morning when I felt quite sick). However, I've got a big day planned today. I have five large garden beds to till and a big pile of brush to run through the chipper. I'll post later how that goes. How is PD effecting your life today? Is it preventing you from meeting your goals for today? Is it only a minor inconvenience or a major hurdle?
  12. Work Advice

    Hello, My wife went into work today and her Boss asked to speak with her. She didn't know what he wanted at all she was very curious on what this could be about. Her Boss came out and said to her that they are worried about her medical condition that it seems to be getting worse. My Wife is 46 she was diagnosed about 3yrs ago with PD, and she decided not to tell anybody at work. She is a Outside Sales Rep. for a local newspaper. She ended up telling her boss that she has PD and that her clients don't know either. She is more obvious now because the doctor is regulating her script every 6months. Her Boss said that he is worried she is driving and walking to the clients and she could get hurt and SUE. He also said that he would like her doctor to conference in with him to say she is okay to do her job. I told my wife that ridiculous, the doctor will not do that and its also a privacy issue. But we are going to the Doctor in 2 weeks and ask his advice. My Wife also said he could put her in a part time position in the office and she could collect disability. I don't like the fact that the Boss also the owner just came out and said this to her. He also asked if she would be getting worst in time, she told him yes and we all know it does. I don't know.....Does anybody have any advice.......we are a 2 income family.......I wish she didn't have to work fulltime but its not a good time. Please advise
  13. My 91-year-old mother-in-law has had PD for 10 years. For the past 18 months she has been in a skilled nursing/nursing home facility. For many years she has dealt with UTI's, and for the past year she has had frequent ones. Most recently she was hospitalized for two weeks receiving two different antibiotics through an IV. During her stay in the hospital she did not experience anxiety or freezes, her voice was strong and she ate very well and left the hospital stronger and better than she had been for months. Upon returning to the nursing home, she immediately experienced anxiety, freezes, a great deal of writhing (not present in the hospital), agitation, weak voice, dementia and is once again not eating very well (all of these were present before going to the hospital). Her neurologist and psychiatrist are located out-of-town but we are working with them to regulate medications. The agitation and negativity is our greatest concern at the present; these were not issues for the two weeks she was in the hospital. She is once again resisting medications and help from the CNA's. Tonight we got a call from the facility requesting we come over to encourage her to take an Ativan. She was accusing her son of punching her (which did not happen) and occasionally when she is like this the calls we receive from her are accusing the staff of killing people and giving lethal injections (when in actuality they are dispensing insulin shots). She has called the police on a couple of occasions in the night to report what is going on at the facility. We do not know what to do; we visit her every afternoon so are alert and sensitive to her actions and behaviors. We are going to request another UA tomorrow even though she just had one a week ago that was clear. We want to be able to help her and advocate for her but are out of ideas. We feel truly helpless and are obviously exhausted. Where do we turn for help?
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