Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
Sign in to follow this  
cberninger

Parkinson's MSA or PSP symmetrical in symptoms?

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone. I am a YOPDer that was diagnosed in 5/2010 at 34. I went through the DaTscan trial in 7/2010 that confirmed dopamine loss and the diagnosis of early onset PD.

 

I am just curious on one thing even though I will post more often.

 

How is PD different from the parkinson's plus syndromes MSA and PSP

Is the distinguishing factor that MSA or PSP are symmetrical in symptoms?

 

Any info to shed light on this would be great. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

I think there are more differences between these disorders than what you have mentioned regarding symmetry of presenting symptoms.

 

The Mayo clinic has several pages of info on each of these disorders. Just enter the disorder and the words Mayo Clinic in your search box. Each page is a topic such as

symptoms or causes , risk factors, treatment,etc. I think it might be easier to compare these disorders in this way than relying on scattered bits and pieces you may gather here. Good luck with your search. I hope you learn what you need to know.

Eileen

Edited by woodbee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost forgot......welcome ...and sorry to learn that you are so young and dealing with PD or a related disorder. There are a mix of really great people here of differing ages but we share a common disease and a common desire to live our lives as best we can in spite of PD. Feel free to Join us at any time.

Eileen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost forgot......welcome ...and sorry to learn that you are so young and dealing with PD or a related disorder. There are a mix of really great people here of differing ages but we share a common disease and a common desire to live our lives as best we can in spite of PD. Feel free to Join us at any time.

Eileen

 

 

Thanks for the advice. I found what I was looking for. I am 99.9% certain that I do have YOPD, not MSA or PSP.

 

PSP - How is PSP different from Parkinson's disease?

 

Both PSP and Parkinson's disease cause stiffness, movement difficulties, and clumsiness. However, people with PSP usually stand straight or occasionally even tilt their heads backward (and tend to fall backward), while those with Parkinson's disease usually bend forward. Problems with speech and swallowing are much more common and severe in PSP than in Parkinson's disease, and tend to show up earlier in the course of the disease. Eye movements are abnormal in PSP but close to normal in Parkinson's disease. Both diseases share other features: onset in late middle age, bradykinesia (slow movement), and rigidity of muscles. Tremor, almost universal in individuals with Parkinson's disease, is rare in PSP. Although individuals with Parkinson's disease markedly benefit from the drug levodopa, people with PSP respond poorly and only transiently to this drug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

I think there are more differences between these disorders than what you have mentioned regarding symmetry of presenting symptoms.

 

The Mayo clinic has several pages of info on each of these disorders. Just enter the disorder and the words Mayo Clinic in your search box. Each page is a topic such as

symptoms or causes , risk factors, treatment,etc. I think it might be easier to compare these disorders in this way than relying on scattered bits and pieces you may gather here. Good luck with your search. I hope you learn what you need to know.

Eileen

Here's what eMedicine has to say on Multiple System Atrophy:

MSA -

Parkinsonism: The vast majority of patients with multiple system atrophy develop parkinsonism at some point, and it is often rapidly progressive.

◦Bradykinesia with rigidity, tremor, or postural instability

Although presentation can be asymmetric (as is usually the case in Parkinson disease), symmetry of onset is particularly suggestive of MSA-P.

Absence of tremor is suggestive of MSA-P (vs Parkinson disease). When present, tremor is usually irregular, postural, and often incorporates myoclonus. While resting tremor can be observed, it is uncommon.

◦Patients may have had poor response to a previous trial of levodopa.

 

•Dysautonomia: Autonomic failure to some degree is almost universal and may be the presenting symptom. Genitourinary complaints are common early in the disease.

◦Male erectile dysfunction

◦Urinary symptoms (frequency, urgency, incomplete bladder emptying, and incontinence)

◦Postural or postprandial hypotension (Syncopal events may occur secondary to cerebral hypoperfusion.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like you did your homework...thanks for sharing the differences. You were on the right track regarding the symmetry of presenting symptoms. I hope you will continue to share your journey with us here. We all learn valuable info and lessons from one another.

Have good days

Eileen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×