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lethe

medical marijuana

750 posts in this topic

http://tinyurl.com/3qegn7p

Pot laws ruled unconstitutional

 

Jennifer Yang Staff Reporter

 

An Ontario Superior Court judge has ruled that the federal medical marijuana program is unconstitutional, giving the government three months to fix the problem before pot is effectively legalized.

 

In an April 11 ruling, Justice Donald Taliano found that doctors across the country have “massively boycotted” the medical marijuana program and largely refuse to sign off on forms giving sick people access to necessary medication.

 

As a result, legitimately sick people cannot access medical marijuana through appropriate means and must resort to illegal actions.

 

Doctors’ “overwhelming refusal to participate in the medicinal marijuana program completely undermines the effectiveness of the program,” the judge wrote in his ruling.

 

“The effect of this blind delegation is that seriously ill people who need marijuana to treat their symptoms are branded criminals simply because they are unable to overcome the barriers to legal access put in place by the legislative scheme.”

 

Taliano declared the program to be invalid, as well as the criminal laws prohibiting possession and production of cannabis. He suspended his ruling for three months, giving Ottawa until mid-July to fix the program or face the prospect of effectively legalizing possession and production of cannabis.

 

The judge’s decision comes in a criminal case involving Matthew Mernagh, 37, of St. Catharines who suffers from fibromyalgia, scoliosis, seizures and depression.

 

Marijuana is the most effective treatment of Mernagh’s pain. But despite years of effort, he has been unable to find a doctor to support his application for a medical marijuana licence.

 

Mernagh resorted to growing his own cannabis and was charged with producing the drug.

 

Taliano found doctors essentially act as gatekeepers to the medical marijuana program but lack the necessary knowledge to adequately give advice or recommend the drug. He also found that Health Canada has made “no real attempt to deal with this lack of knowledge.”

 

Taliano said the issue is Canada-wide.

 

Twenty-one patients from across the country testified in the case, saying they were rejected by doctors a total of 113 times.

 

One Alberta patient was refused by 26 doctors; another in Vancouver approached 37 physicians without finding a single one to sign off on the form.

 

Patients also face lengthy delays — as long as nine months — in having their medical marijuana applications processed by Health Canada.

 

“The body of evidence from Mr. Mernagh and the other patient witnesses is troubling,” Taliano wrote. “The evidence of the patient witnesses, which I accept, showed that patients have to go to extraordinary lengths to acquire the marijuana they need.”

 

Lawyer Alan Young, a longtime advocate of marijuana legalization, said the ruling is a step in the right direction.

 

“It’s significant because it’s a Superior Court ruling which has binding effect across the province,” Young said.

 

“By enacting a dysfunctional medical program the government now has to pay the high cost of losing the constitutional authority to criminalize marijuana.”

 

He said the real test, however, will be whether the judgment stands up in the Ontario Court of Appeal.

 

“If the government is not successful on appeal, they are going to be caught between a rock and a hard place because they don’t have an alternative program in mind,” he said. “They don’t have a plan B. They’re in trouble.”

 

The medical profession has been wary of the medical marijuana program since it came into effect in August 2001.

 

On May 7, 2001, the Canadian Medical Association wrote a letter to the federal health minister expressing concerns with recommending a drug that has had little scientific evidence to support its medicinal benefits.

 

“Physicians must not be expected to act as gatekeepers to this therapy, yet this is precisely the role Health Canada had thrust upon them,” the letter stated.

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This is a link to Jack Herer's website, the grandfather of the American medical marijuana movement. He died recently and his famous book on the history of marijuana, "The Emperor Wears No Clothes" is now available free. Many facts will surprise you.... Here is the 1st chapter.

 

http://www.jackherer.com/thebook/

 

 

1

 

The Emperor Wears No Clothes

 

By Jack Herer

 

Overview of the History of Cannabis Hemp

 

For the Purpose of Clarity in this Book:

 

Explanations or documentations marked with an asterisk (*) are listed at the end of the related paragraph(s). For brevity, other sources for facts, anecdotes, histories, studies, etc., are cited in the body of the text. Numbered footnotes are at the end of each chapter. Reproductions of selected critical source materials are incorporated into the body of the text or included in the appendices.

 

The facts cited herein are generally verifiable in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, which was printed primarily on paper produced with cannabis hemp for over 150 years. However, any encyclopedia (no matter how old) or good dictionary will do for general verification purposes.

 

Cannabis Sativa L.

 

Also known as: Hemp, cannabis hemp, Indian (India) hemp, true hemp, muggles, weed, pot, spinach, marijuana, reefer, grass, ganja, bhang, the kind, dagga, herb, etc., all names for exactly the same plant!

 

What’s in a Name?

 

(U.S. Geography)

 

HEMPstead, Long Island; HEMPstead County, Arkansas; HEMPstead, Texas; HEMPhill, North Carolina, HEMPfield, Pennsylvania, among others, were named after cannabis growing regions, or after family names derived from hemp growing.

 

American Historical Notes

 

In 1619, America’s first marijuana law was enacted at Jamestown Colony, Virginia, “ordering” all farmers to “make tryal of “(grow) Indian hempseed. More mandatory (must-grow) hemp cultivation laws were enacted in Massachusetts in 1631, in Connecticut in 1632 and in the Chesapeake Colonies into the mid-1700s.

 

Even in England, the much-sought-after prize of full British citizenship was bestowed by a decree of the crown on foreigners who would grow cannabis, and fines were often levied against those who refused.

 

Cannabis hemp was legal tender (money) in most of the Americas from 1631 until the early 1800s. Why? To encourage American farmers to grow more.1

 

You could pay your taxes with cannabis hemp throughout America for over 200 years.2

 

You could even be jailed in America for not growing cannabis during several periods of shortage, e.g., in Virginia between 1763 and 1767.

 

(Herndon, G.M., Hemp in Colonial Virginia, 1963; The Chesapeake Colonies, 1954; L.A. Times, August 12, 1981; et al.)

 

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew cannabis on their plantations. Jefferson,3 while envoy to France, went to great expense, and even considerable risk to himself and his secret agents, to procure particularly good hempseeds smuggled illegally into Turkey from China. The Chinese Mandarins (political rulers) so valued their hemp seed that they made its exportation a capital offense.

 

The Chinese character “Ma” was the earliest name for hemp. By the 10th century, A.D., Ma had become the generic term for fibers of all kinds, including jute and ramie. By then, the word for hemp had become “Ta-ma” or “Da-ma” meaning “great hemp.”

 

The United States Census of 1850 counted 8,327 hemp “plantations”* (minimum 2,000-acre farms) growing cannabis hemp for cloth, canvas and even the cordage used for baling cotton. Most of these plantations were located in the South or in the Border States, primarily because of the cheap slave labor available prior to 1865 for the labor-intensive hemp industry.

 

(U.S. Census, 1850; Allen, James Lane, The Reign of Law, A Tale of the Kentucky Hemp Fields, MacMillan Co., NY, 1900; Roffman, Roger. Ph.D., Marijuana as Medicine, Mendrone Books, WA, 1982.)

 

*This figure does not include the tens of thousands of smaller farms growing cannabis, nor the hundreds of thousands if not millions of family hemp patches in America; nor does it take into account that well into this century 80% of America’s hemp consumption for 200 years still had to be imported from Russia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Poland, etc..

 

Benjamin Franklin started one of America’s first paper mills with cannabis. This allowed America to have a free colonial press without having to beg or justify the need for paper and books from England.

 

In addition, various marijuana and hashish extracts were the first, second or third most-prescribed medicines in the United States from 1842 until the 1890s. Its medicinal use continued legally through the 1930s for humans and figured even more prominently in American and world veterinary medicines during this time.

 

Cannabis extract medicines were produced by Eli Lilly, Parke-Davis, Tildens, Brothers Smith (Smith Brothers), Squibb and many other American and European companies and apothecaries. During all this time there was not one reported death from cannabis extract medicines, and virtually no abuse or mental disorders reported, except for first-time or novice-users occasionally becoming disoriented or overly introverted.

 

(Mikuriya, Tod, M.D., Marijuana Medical Papers, Medi-Comp Press, CA, 1973; Cohen, Sidney & Stillman, Richard, Therapeutic Potential of Marijuana, Plenum Press, NY, 1976.)

 

World Historical Notes

 

“The earliest known woven fabric was apparently of hemp, which began to be worked in the eighth millennium (8,000-7,000 B.C.).” (The Columbia History of the World, 1981, page 54.)

 

The body of literature (i.e., archaeology, anthropology, philology, economy, history) pertaining to hemp is in general agreement that, at the very least:

 

From more than 1,000 years before the time of Christ until 1883 A.D., cannabis hemp, indeed, marijuana was our planet’s largest agricultural crop and most important industry, involving thousands of products and enterprises; producing the overall majority of Earth’s fiber, fabric, lighting oil, paper, incense and medicines. In addition, it was a primary source of essential food oil and protein for humans and animals.

 

According to virtually every anthropologist and university in the world, marijuana was also used in most of our religions and cults as one of the seven or so most widely used mood-, mind-or pain-altering drugs when taken as psychotropic, psychedelic (mind-manifesting or -expanding) sacraments.

 

Almost without exception, these sacred (drug) experiences inspired our superstitions, amulets, talismans, religions, prayers, and language codes. (See Chapter10 on “Religions and Magic.”)

 

(Wasson, R. Gordon, Soma, Divine Mushroom of Immortality; Allegro, J.M., Sacred Mushroom & the Cross, Doubleday, NY, 1969; Pliny; Josephus; Herodotus; Dead Sea Scrolls; Gnostic Gospels; the Bible; Ginsberg Legends Kaballah, c. 1860; Paracelsus; British Museum; Budge; Ency. Britannica, Pharmacological Cults; Schultes & Wasson, Plants of the Gods; Research of: R.E. Schultes, Harvard Botanical Dept.; Wm. EmBoden, Cal State U., Northridge; et al.)

 

Great Wars were Fought to Ensure

 

the Availability of Hemp

 

For example, the primary reason for the War of 1812 (fought by America against Great Britain) was access to Russian cannabis hemp. Russian hemp was also the principal reason that Napoleon (our 1812 ally) and his “Continental Systems” allies invaded Russia in 1812. (See Chapter 11, “The (Hemp) War of 1812 and Napoleon Invades Russia.”)

 

In 1942, after the Japanese invasion of the Philippines cut off the supply of Manila (Abaca) hemp, the U.S. government distributed 400,000 pounds of cannabis seeds to American farmers from Wisconsin to Kentucky, who produced 42,000 tons of hemp fiber annually until 1946 when the war ended.

 

Why Has Cannabis Hemp Been

 

so Important in History?

 

Because cannabis hemp is, overall, the strongest, most-durable, longest-lasting natural soft-fiber on the planet. Its leaves and flower tops (marijuana) were, depending on the culture, the first, second or third most-important and most-used medicines for two-thirds of the world’s people for at least 3,000 years, until the turn of the 20th century.

 

Botanically, hemp is a member of the most advanced plant family on Earth. It is a dioecious (having male, female and sometimes hermaphroditic, male and female on same plant), woody, herbaceous annual that uses the sun more efficiently than virtually any other plant on our planet, reaching a robust 12 to 20 feet or more in one short growing season. It can be grown in virtually any climate or soil condition on Earth, even marginal ones.

 

Hemp is, by far, Earth’s premier, renewable natural resource. This is why hemp is so very important.

 

Footnotes:

 

1. Clark, V.S., History of Manufacture in the United States, McGraw Hill, NY 1929, Pg. 34.

 

2. Ibid.

 

3. Diaries of George Washington; Writings of George Washington, Letter to Dr. James Anderson, May 26, 1794, vol. 33, p. 433, (U.S. govt. pub., 1931); Letters to his caretaker, William Pearce, 1795 & 1796; Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson’s Farm Books; Abel, Ernest, Marijuana: The First 12,000 Years, Plenum Press, NY, 1980; Dr. Michael Aldrich, et al.

 

Chapter Two – http://www.jackherer.com/thebook/chapter-two/

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Dr. Oz had a very interesting program on medical marijuana with Montel Williams and several other people presenting the problems and benefits.

 

Several things stood out. You can google his show and probably get the entire presentation by the way.

 

1. He said 1 out of 7 will become addicted to marijuana and use it as a gate way drug to more dangerous drugs.

 

2. The California laws regarding medical marijuana are generally considered a joke - you can get medical marijuana for dry skin for example. New Jersey is just as bad because they have legalized it for medical purposes but it is not available to those who really need it.

 

3. Some people achieve major benefit from marijuana - in particular relief from pain for cancer and chronic diseases as well as some finding relief from problems from AIDS.

 

4.Dr. Oz's final statement about medical marijuana said what I expect most of us with extensive experience with people who use/d it for escape believe also - MEDICAL MARIJUANA SHOULD BE USED TO GIVE YOU BACK YOUR LIFE, NOT TAKE YOU AWAY FROM LIFE and the laws should be adjusted so those who will benefit have access and those who are using it to get high to escape can get help with their addiction problems because they will abuse something else whether it be legal or not.

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One more comment, not to hijack the thread, but if we legalize medical marijuana we will have to deal with it - those of you who do not have addiction problems, in many cases, have no idea just how serious this problem is as a health issue. It is not a self control issue, it is a medical problem. Some people have "the addiction gene" but have brakes on behavior and will avoid anything that they realize could become an addiction but others do not have these brakes and in fact medical science is studying PD because they feel perhaps understanding it better will allow them to provide the brakes addicts need to stay away from their addictions once they know they exist. We all know how addictive the opiates are. One study provided unlimited access to heroin to cancer patients with unbearable pain. The interesting part of this study is that some of the cancer patients did survive and at least go into remission for quite a while and, guess what, they had no problems at all stopping the heroin. If you don't have the addiction gene or you have the brakes that allows you to avoid what you are attracted to, you can stop any time. My parents had no problems stopping smoking when they decided it was impacting their health. Other people go to the grave still smoking, even when on oxygen because of emphysema. This is a HUGE medical problem that will bankrupt the health system and the prison system because addicts will kill their own mother and sell their children to get the drugs they want. Let's hope that our most annoying problem, PD, will indeed help solve this devastating epidemic so that these powerful drugs will be much easier to obtain for those who really need them.

 

Sorry I'm on this soapbox but a friend's daughter was beaten almost to death by her boyfriend a couple of days ago, went to a domestic safe house and got kicked out because of drug use and had her kids taken away from her. They have no idea where she is now. A smart beautiful kind and caring young woman destroyed by drug addiction. . And it's rampant. I can't tell you how many personal friends are raising grandchildren dropped off by their drug addicted kids who have the baby, bring it to "mom and dad", stay a little while, then disappear. I'm so sad

Edited by netgypsy

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netgypsy, I found your post on addiction very succinct and interesting. I am very sorry to hear that you have family members in such a bad situation.

 

regards

Sue

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Thanks Sue. They are dear friends who are like family and whose kids I've known since they were tiny. I do have a first cousin though whose oldest son went to prison because of an addiction problem so yes it's in my family also. It impacts everyone and will continue to do so until the problem is solved by medical science with the help of the rest of us.

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A video by Gary Wenk, professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the Ohio State University, on how marijuana and coffee are good for you.... The recent discoveries concerning cannabinols and the body has revolutionized understanding of how and why marijuana is a powerful and safe natural medicine.

 

 

http://tinyurl.com/69vbpcc

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Sorry I'm on this soapbox but a friend's daughter was beaten almost to death by her boyfriend a couple of days ago, went to a domestic safe house and got kicked out because of drug use and had her kids taken away from her. They have no idea where she is now. A smart beautiful kind and caring young woman destroyed by drug addiction. . And it's rampant. I can't tell you how many personal friends are raising grandchildren dropped off by their drug addicted kids who have the baby, bring it to "mom and dad", stay a little while, then disappear. I'm so sad

 

Yes, please get off your soapbox and high horse and stop hijacking my thread on MEDICAL MARIJIUANA !!

Honestly, it seems like all your friends, family, and neighbours have serious drug issues.... I've never known anyone end in jail or anything other than rehab.... I guess it all depends on your environment.

 

It's funny how when people take their opiate-based meds they don't think of heroin addicts, or as they drink their fine wine or beer they don't think of alcoholics (or their partying university sons) laying in vomit, but marijuana? Prison, addictions, etc - "Reefer Madness".

 

You wanna hijack my thread! Fine, I'll just have to join in on some religious discussions.... hehehe

 

Here's something to think about:

 

"Religion is the opiate of the masses."

Marx

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Lethe, please dispense with the accusations and threats. Both you and Netgypsy made legitimate points.

Personally I have seen more of the behavior that netgypsy describes than people using and benefiting from medicinal use of mj. My niece who is in remission from cancer recently shared with me that she had used mj. I asked her if it had helped. she responded it helped a lot with chemo/cancer symptoms but she was "too stoned" to do anything else and felt "removed from daily living" (her words, not mine) and so she quit using it. I have heard of people who genuinely benefit from it's usage...I just don't know any personally. I do not object to med use of mj.

 

As regards threatening netgypsy: He probably would not care or mind if you hijacked the religion threads as he has a strong science background and does not appear to be religious.

 

I believe the only thing he really uses his soap box for these days is to get on one of several( high ) horses he owns.

 

Lighten up, it's a public forum...you don't own the thread. If you put out a viewpoint on a public forum you can or should expect a wide degree of responses could occur (Hopefully however, people will be respectful and demonstrate critical thinking.)

 

One last but interesting statistic:(study was done in the US....I don't know if the stats apply to other countries)) 85% of people look for info to support their current beliefs and opinions. A mere 15 % actually can examine information that might contradict their opinions/beliefs and adapt their thinking as new information presents itself or as the person becomes aware of it.

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there our lots of other things that can become addictive....not just MJ mundane things like shoppin sex food ect ect.....

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Lethe if you have PD I can't imagine that you would have any problem at all getting all the marijuana you need if it helps you. My aunt who had cancer was able to get it easily in a very conservative state where it is not legal. So why the religious fervor in your promotion of legalization and the visceral hostility toward anyone who remotely suggests caution?

 

Carol42 that's for sure - I took requip for about 5 years and had some serious compulsions that luckily went away when I stopped taking it and didn't get me in trouble. Obesity is an addiction problem and overspending and gambling and so on and too many times when one addiction is overcome it is replaced by another. It's really a serious issue.

Edited by netgypsy

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Lethe, as a fellow Canadian I wish I could support your stance more but:

 

90 % of crime stems from drug trade. Most drug users started with MJ and worked up

 

Sucking smoke into your lungs has to gum them up

 

The possibility of addiction is real, therefore it is related info and isn't a hi jacking

 

And the following applies to alot of studies; your statement;

 

A video by Gary Wenk, professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the Ohio State University, on how marijuana and coffee are good for you.... The recent discoveries concerning cannabinols and the body has revolutionized understanding of how and why marijuana is a powerful and safe natural medicine

 

I think that any statement uttered about almost anything could with some digging find some academic study group to verify the statement as true.

 

And Lethe, don't forget to vote on Monday

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@netgypsy "if you have PD I can't imagine that you would have any problem at all getting all the marijuana you need if it helps you. My aunt who had cancer was able to get it easily in a very conservative state where it is not legal. So why the religious fervor in your promotion of legalization and the visceral hostility toward anyone who remotely suggests caution?"

 

I have PD and I know that from dabbling with the use of marijuana years ago, that it would help with the insomnia I'm currently suffering from. The stuff always knocked me out. However since it is illegal in my state, I'd not dream of going out and buying it. I'd love to see it legalized or at the very least decriminalized. While I watched my dad die a slow painful death from cancer, I offered to buy him some marijuana to help with the side effects of chemo. He wouldn't let me because he didn't want me to break the law. No over the counter nausea med worked for him, neither did the prescription ones.

 

@jb...There are other ways of ingesting marijuana. It does not have to be smoked. In the past most drug users might of started with MJ but I'd bet most MJ users never moved on to harder drugs. In my part of the world, MJ isn't the drug I worry about with the teenagers. Meth and huffing are much more readily available along with prescription drugs like xanax. I think Meth is the new gateway drug :(

 

Here is an interesting article about gateway drugs...It's an easy read.

Marijuana as a Gateway Drug: The Myth That Will Not Die Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2010/10/29/marijuna-as-a-gateway-drug-the-myth-that-will-not-die/print/#ixzz1L5A7yHJH

Edited by CynthiaM

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What a very interesting thread....

 

In particular, a few points that jump out..

 

Coffee....The first (and possibly the last) book I read specifically on parkinsons was 'Stop Parkin and Start Livin' by John Coleman. I have sort of followed his advice on and off for the past couple of years and find his ideas very sensible. In his list of 'good' and 'bad' foods (created by a nutiritionist)...coffee came out on the 'bad' list....but I have subsquently read (and again here) that it should be on the 'good' list.....can anyone shed any light on this? (or perhaps I should post this to Kathrynne Holden...)

 

A very powerful message coming from one of these articles was EAT LESS. How interesting. And how revolutionary....i've read about this before...that the best thing you can do for your body is to just stop stuffing so much into it....which is totally at war with the modern advertising campaigns which all focus (of course...because it makes money)...on the pleasure to be derived from eating...drinking...constant stimulation and over-stimulation....why would kids just drink water when fifty different versions of fizzy pop, semi-fizzy pop, still pop and every other sort of flippin pop are available? I'm beginning to think we'd be better off if the whole lot was just ripped out of the shops and banned along with all the other processed junk we (I) eat because it's convenient...it tastes nice....it gives us (me) some sort of satisfaction of craving....I watched a nature programme the other day.....these guys spent days waiting to catch some bats. They caught them.They ate the lot including the wings. Job done. I've read many times that it isn't so much the quantity or even the variety of food you eat that is important...it is merely the quality....and the right quality of food tells you that you are full when you are.

 

Eileen, your last paragraph was very interesting and pertinent and should remind all of us to challange ourselves...in fact that is what threads like this do for me...remind me to wake up and smell the coffee..... :wink:

 

And Lethe...I loved your quote....I think that would make a very interesting debate for a cold and windy night....hot toddy's all round!

 

my best to everyone...and hi Carol.....straight on the money as always!

 

On a final note, I have heard of 'pot' being baked into cakes....i've never tried one but am curious...

 

Sue

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Sue, I've read about it being baked in baked goods also. But I wonder how you would control consumed amount. Doesn't sound very scientific.

 

I went through chemotherapy and it made me very nauseous. Nothing helped. I didn't think about medical marijuana. It was illegal in my state anyway. I did hear from other people from legal states that said it did help with nausea. Not sure if they smoked it.

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Lethe if you have PD I can't imagine that you would have any problem at all getting all the marijuana you need if it helps you. My aunt who had cancer was able to get it easily in a very conservative state where it is not legal. So why the religious fervor in your promotion of legalization and the visceral hostility toward anyone who remotely suggests caution?

 

Your aunt was lucky, as I recently posted that a Canadian judge threw out marijuana laws here (temporarily suspended) because of the fact that many seriously sick people could not get their Drs to sign on and many of these people would never get it off the street as it's too dangerous.

 

Three years ago I had a severe psychotic and physical reaction to medicine which put me in the hospital (intensive care) and advanced my PD, giving me even more symptoms. Many of these symptoms have not been responsive to medicine. Many PWP are taking a wide variety of meds, in many cases some of these meds are not actually treating PD but the side-effects of some of the meds. Marijuana effectively treats many of my symptoms. Without it life is flat and there is no escaping PD, it is front and centre every minute of the day. With MM I am able to transcend the negative symptoms and PD symptoms recede into the background, allowing me to feel close to normal. There are many silent PWP who are unable to do things, even get out of bed. My `religious fervour` in promoting marijuana is to make these people aware that MM might just effectively treat their symptoms.

 

My `hostility` with people who post the same old tired cliches about the `dangers` of M is because I`m tired of wasting my time responding to such knee-jerk responses. We are all adults here and I`m sure we`ve all heard about M `dangers`. We are all very sick too, so you lecturing about its imaginary dangers it just trying to hijack the thread, cause god-forbid anyone uses such an evil weed!

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Lethe, as a fellow Canadian I wish I could support your stance more but:

90 % of crime stems from drug trade. Most drug users started with MJ and worked up

Sucking smoke into your lungs has to gum them up

The possibility of addiction is real, therefore it is related info and isn't a hi jacking

And the following applies to alot of studies; your statement;

 

A video by Gary Wenk, professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the Ohio State University, on how marijuana and coffee are good for you.... The recent discoveries concerning cannabinols and the body has revolutionized understanding of how and why marijuana is a powerful and safe natural medicine

 

I think that any statement uttered about almost anything could with some digging find some academic study group to verify the statement as true.

 

 

90% crime stems from drug trade - That number is obviously off the top of your head and not fact-based. The War on Drugs is not only a failure, it actually helps organized crime strengthen their grip on drugs.

 

Most drug users started with marijuana - Baloney. Does that include pharmaceutical addicts..... I`ll bet more started with cigerettes...

 

I rarely smoke. I vaporize, which is healthy.... you can also cook or bake with it.

 

It`s not addictive. I`m sorry JB but I don`t have the time or energy to correct all your misconceptions, but if you are genuinely interested some of the videos I post will better inform you....

 

Yes, you can find anything online to back up a viewpoint, but all the more reason to carefully look over a source - is it reputable, what year was it done, who financed it, etc.

 

Another video:

http://tinyurl.com/3tjcsvx

Edited by lethe

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Lethe,

 

I am grateful for some of the things i've learnt from this thread but lets be clear here, marijuana (as opposed to medical maijuana...not clear of the desinction?) can be very addictive and some of here have had personal experience of that.

 

To suggest otherwise would be very misleading to anyone who reads this thread.

 

Sue

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Good Morning Lethe

 

1. I tend to talk before finding out facts

2. I am pretty conservative (voted for Harper,again!)

3. You nailed me with off the top of my head 90% crime rate, I did make that up

4. Tried mj only once, prefer beer,

5. used to smoke cigs, addictions`are bad

6. have talked to lots of people about Medical Marij and found out more

7. Have been surprised by the number of people who use

8. Bad car accident nearby last week, Driver causing it was stoned on mj

9. Hemp which is pushed as a renewable fibre crop and grown by George Washington doesn't produce the potent smoke desired by users

10. Mj does have, as other drugs do, unwanted side effects such as memory loss and cardiovascular issues

11. People with license for Medical M, want the more potent and juiced up street m anyway

12. I am very happy that you find it helpful, I wouldn't deny it to anyone that it helps

13. I would try it if I thought it would help me

14. I try to stay open minded

15. I will read more

16. Pot conventions on the street corner or Parliament Hill with crazed looking teens sucking on fat reefers on the evening's 6 oclock news don't paint a good picture for legalization of mj

17. I agree that beer and liquor are as bad. More controls on all these substances may be needed

18. mj probably doesn't need to be criminal.

19. Mj needs to remain a controlled substance

20. I sincerely wish you well in your battle with PD. Use whatever tools you think are best. At the end of the day, it is up to ourselves to seek, demand and use what we think is best.

 

Okay Lethe? I hope that you have a good day.

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The following article is long but worth reading and bookmarking; to read full article follow link - here is a paragraph specifically relating to Pakinson's.

 

Harm reduction-the cannabis paradox

Robert Melamede

 

"The use of cannabinoids in the treatment of Parkinson's disease is an example of a condition where excessive or deficient cannabinoid activity may prove problematic. Parkinson's disease results from the loss of levo-dopamine (L-dopa) producing neurons. In an animal model of Parkinson's disease, L-dopa producing cells are killed with 6-hydroxydopamine. Rats so treated exhibit spontaneous glutamatergic activity that can be suppressed by exo- as well as endocannabinoids [61]. The standard treatment for Parkinson's disease involves L-dopa replacement therapy. Unfortunately, this treatment often results in dyskinesia (abnormal voluntary movements). Recent clinical trials have shown that cannabinoid treatment reduces the reuptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and relieves the L-dopa-induced dyskinesia [33], as well as L-dopa induced rotations in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats [62]. In contrast to the potential benefits of cannabinoid agonists just cited, using a different animal model, the cannabis antagonist SR141716A reduced reserpine-induced suppression of locomotion [63]. Thus, in this model locomotion was restored by inhibiting the endocannabinoid pathway."

 

http://www.harmreductionjournal.com/content/2/1/17

Edited by lethe

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Thanks Lethe. Very informative article. It makes me sad that more research on cannabis wasn't done years ago when it might have been a benefit to my sweet momma. She suffered horribly from chronic progressive MS for 30 years. She had to take very strong pharmaceuticals to help with the muscle spasms in her legs and arms. The "legal" drugs would totally wipe her out so she'd resist taking them for the relief from the spasms and the pain.

Edited by CynthiaM

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Lethe,

 

Thank you for taking the time to point out some positive facts about Medical MaryJ. I know that I am a little uptight about some things. You have shown me some things to think about. The Jury in my mind is still out but, maybe I will use it one day too. Good luck in your fight with Parkinsons and use whatever weapons you find helpful.

 

Sincerely john

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http://tinyurl.com/3ws4esy

 

War on drugs a flop, global panel says

 

 

Michelle Nichols Reuters

 

NEW YORK—A high-profile group of global leaders declared the “war on drugs” a failure Thursday and urged governments to consider decriminalizing drugs in a bid to cut consumption and weaken the power of organized crime gangs.

 

The Global Commission on Drug Policy, which includes former presidents of Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Switzerland, said a decades-long strategy of outlawing drugs and jailing drug users while battling cartels that control the trade had not worked.

 

“It’s not peace instead of war, it’s a more intelligent way to fight ... the use of drugs,” former Brazilian president Fernando Henrique Cardoso, chair of the commission, told a news conference in New York. “Stop the war on drugs and let’s be more constructive in trying to reduce consumption.”

 

“We cannot have one recipe. It’s not so easy to say, ‘Stop the war on drugs and let’s legalize’; it’s more complicated than that,” he said. “Between prohibition and legalization there is an enormous variety of solutions in between.”

 

The commission recommended that governments experiment with the legal regulation of drugs, especially cannabis, referring to the success of countries such as Portugal, Switzerland and the Netherlands, where drug consumption has been reduced.

 

In 2001, Portugal decriminalized all drug consumption and users now face fines and treatment instead of jail time, while in Holland heroin can be medically prescribed and in Switzerland addicts get free methadone and clean needles.

 

But the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy said in a statement that making drugs more available would make it harder to keep communities healthy and safe. The United States is the biggest market for illegal drugs.

 

Ruth Dreifuss, former president of Switzerland, told reporters: “Drugs can be sexy when they are underground ... If you medicalize, it’s no longer sexy.”

 

Users “know now that they are ill persons and not rebels in society. It’s no longer sexy and it’s no longer attractive for future rebels,” she said.

 

The commission, which also includes former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan, former U.S. Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker and British billionaire Richard Branson, said drug users should be offered health and treatment services instead of being treated like criminals.

 

There are 250 million users of illicit drugs worldwide, with less than one-tenth classified as dependent. Millions are involved in cultivation, production and distribution, according to UN estimates quoted in the commission’s report.

 

“The war on drugs has increased drug usage, it’s filled our jails, it’s cost millions of taxpayer dollars and it’s fueled organized crime,” Branson said. “It’s estimated that over $1 trillion has been spent on fighting this unwinnable battle.”

 

The commission — which grew from the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy convened by Cardoso, former Colombian president Cesar Gaviria and former Mexican president Ernesto Zedillo — also hopes to spark a UN debate.

 

“What we are arguing (to the United Nations) is: Open up the debate, be more flexible and learn other lessons from other countries who have changed their drug policies,” said former German government drug commissioner Marion Caspers-Merk, adding that the world body had criticized some of her drug policies.

 

Rafael Lemaitre, communications director of the White House drug policy office, said in the statement: “The bottom line is that balanced drug control efforts are making a big difference.”

 

“Drug use in America is half of what it was 30 years ago, cocaine production in Colombia has dropped by almost two-thirds, and we’re successfully diverting thousands of nonviolent offenders into treatment instead of jail by supporting alternatives to incarceration,” he said.

 

The commission recommended that countries continuing to invest in a mostly law enforcement approach should focus on violent organized crime and drug traffickers, and that reduced sentences should be promoted for people at the low end of the trade, such as farmers, couriers and petty dealers.

 

“In Europe, it’s easy to treat the question as just a health problem,” Cardoso said.

 

“In Latin America, it’s not just a health problem, it’s also a problem of gangs and ... violence and the control of local power by drug lords, so it’s more complicated and the government has to be much more active in fighting,” he said.

 

The commission said money governments waste on futile drug war efforts could be better spent on various ways to reduce drug demand and the harm caused by drug abuse.

 

The full report is available at www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/Report.

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