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lethe

medical marijuana

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Lethe,

 

I am seriously considering trying marijuana for my tremor, which is still not adequately controlled with exercise.  I live in a state where marijuana is not legal, but it is decriminalized below 100 grams.

 

I have 4 questions:

 

1) do you think it would be possible to buy "street" marijuana that would be helpful for tremor.  Do street dealers typically sell different varieties of marijuana?  If so, is there a common variety that I should ask for?

 

2) if I vaporize the marijuana, will I smell like pot?  Does the vapor smell like pot?

 

3)  Is there an advantage to making oil/wax from the plants?  If so, what is the most effective way to use the oil/was?

 

4) I'm thinking about buying a Haze Vaporizer.  Are you familiar with that device and would you recommend it?

 

Thanks for your help!

 

 

In case Lethe doesn't respond....

 

1) Sometimes you can find growers that are growing for medicinal purposes but more than likely it's recreational. Street growers aren't tested. Organic grows are the best. It'll likely not have a lot of CBD. CW Botanicals is a great source for CBD. Use the tincture with and without your street weed. I think CBD is highly beneficial. Next; Sativa vs Indica vs Hybrid.... Sativa's don't do enough for me regarding pain. They are a bit more of a head buzz. I like hybrid's and Indica dominant strains. Sativa hybrid for day/provides a bit of a lift. Indica's for sleepy time. My all time Indica favorite is Couchlock, it lives up to it's name. I started cannabis for my PD at the same time as Sinemet. My tremor went away but I can't say for sure from what. I no longer take sinemet but use mucuna... still the tremor has not returned except an occasional transient tremor after mucuna. I do believe it helps. You'll love the body stone from a good Indica!!

 

2) Vapor smells like pot but the vapor doesn't linger. Once it dissipates it's like it was never there (no smell). You won't smell like pot.

 

3) Ive used alcohol tinctures (double boil the alcohol and you'll have straight oil). This method is very effective and discrete. It's milder compared to vaping (IF YOU DON'T OVER DO IT!!) Edibles and oils can rip you and send you into outer space if you are not careful with the dose.

 

4) The Haze looks great! I have the Pax 2 and the Herbalizer. The Pax 2 and Haze are similar in use but the Herbalizer is way more efficient. The Volcano or Herbalizer would be the way to go if you use it primarily at home. The desk tops are well worth the money. I would lean toward the Volcano since the Herbie is a bit too pricey.

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Stiffler,

 

Thanks for your reply. I appreciate the info. Do you have a specific CBD product from CW Botanicals that you would recommend?

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be helpful for tremor.  Do street dealers typically sell different varieties of marijuana?  If so, is there a common variety that I should ask for?

    

Technically, “medical”marijauna is the same as regular commercial MM, the only difference is that commercial growers normally don’t really know (or care) about the genetics - they for the most part just plant their no-name seeds and just call it “weed”, though that may be changing quickly as medical marijuana gains recognition and the public discovers the ever expanding world  of strains.

 

The only real difference between the two is that the genetics of MM is known and it is carefully cultivated for maximum health benefits.

 

The chances are that, unless you are real lucky and know someone, you will end up with no-name M, though that is not necessarily bad and will still contain beneficial compound, just not the potency of MM.

 

Any grass will help you relax, which will give you mild temporary relief from tremors, but for deeper relief it takes about 2 months of regular use to really kick in. I found this to be true.  Originally a Czech    survey of PWP found this out. I’ve posted do this before and Dr Okun mentions it in his review of MM research,and that this  two month delay would rule out the placebo effect.

 

    2) if I vaporize the marijuana, will I smell like pot?  Does the vapor smell like pot?

 

     No, the vapour doesn’t linger but quickly dissipates. Because there is no burnt material it doesn’t linger and stick to everything. And you won’t smell of it either

 

    3)  Is there an advantage to making oil/wax from the plants?  If so, what is the most effective way to use the oil/was?

 

     Yes, with concentrates it’s much faster to do and stronger so you don’t have to smoke as much. Making it into food is a good way, but it take up to two hours and is 6 times stronger from going thru the liver. Unfortuntely I have slow stomach motility (PD) so that’s not effective for me.

 

    4) I'm thinking about buying a Haze Vaporizer.  Are you familiar with that device and would you recommend it?

 

     I checked it out online and I wasn’nt that impressed. It’s a portable and uses batteries -short lived.  I am on my 2nd Herbalaire. It’s not sexy with only one knob to operate, but that mean less parts to break. It’s a work-horse, first one lasted me 7 years of heavy use.  I use bags to vaporize and the Herbal Aire has two other methods to smoke. It’s known for extracting the most vapour and it costs about $!80 !  I don’t like the volcano, it’ s more for partying with others. I also own the Plenty -made by the same people who make the Volcano - and th solo portable

.

You can check out the websites as well as youtube reviews on all the vaporizers...

 

Edited by lethe

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Stiffler,

 

Thanks for your reply. I appreciate the info. Do you have a specific CBD product from CW Botanicals that you would recommend?

 

All of it. The MCT taste better than the olive oil. I buy the bigger bottle as it is a better value.

 

I'm real curious to how you will respond. I wish that I would have started cannabis separately before starting L-dopa. I can't say for sure which benefits better. Please keep us posted.

 

Lethe - I may have already asked you this but is cannabis your sole treatment or are you taking some other meds as well?

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All of it. The MCT taste better than the olive oil. I buy the bigger bottle as it is a better value.

 

I'm real curious to how you will respond. I wish that I would have started cannabis separately before starting L-dopa. I can't say for sure which benefits better. Please keep us posted.

 

Lethe - I may have already asked you this but is cannabis your sole treatment or are you taking some other meds as well?

 

  i was diagnosed, from physical symptoms, about 15 years ago. I had minimal symptoms - mild tremor right arm, stiffness.  About 12 years ago I went on mirapex - 2 daily. Within  2 years I had a bad psychotic and physical reaction that it took a while to recover  from and was put on 10 levadopa a day. The max a family DR will prescribe, but  with specialists the sky (and than some) is the limit.  About 2 years ago I tapered off to 6 leva dopa daily, plus 2 selegiline. I hope to go down further.

 

My advice in general  is to avoid pharmaceutics whenever possible, but when they are needed they should be taken with the idea that eventually they be replaced wiith stress reducing techniques (and MM :-P ).

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http://fox13now.com/2016/04/23/utah-democrat-governors-nominee-reveals-investigation-for-medical-marijuana-use/

 

Utah Democrat governor’s nominee reveals investigation for medical marijuana use

 

Posted 6:02 pm, April 23, 2016, by Ben Winslow, Updated at 09:26pm, April 23, 2016

 

 
 

SALT LAKE CITY -- The Utah Democratic Party's nominee for governor stunned the state party convention by revealing that his wife is facing a criminal investigation for marijuana use.

 

"In the last 72 hours, we learned that my wonderful wife of 20 years, Donna, is under investigation for possession of marijuana," Mike Weinholtz told the crowd.

 

Weinholtz said his wife has been using marijuana to treat arthritis and chronic pain.

 

"She has only used cannabis for medical reasons to relieve her chronic pain," he said to cheers from the audience, adding: "The issue of medical cannabis touches everyone."

 

In an interview with FOX 13 on Saturday, Mike and Donna Weinholtz said they learned Wednesday she was facing an investigation by law enforcement and have been cooperative.

 

"I don't believe in abusing any substance," Donna Weinholtz told FOX 13. "I don't believing in abusing alcohol, I don't believe in abusing this and that's not what this is about. This is about being able to sleep, being able to relax and not have the pain from arthritis and I know the folks out there know what I'm talking about."

 

Mike Weinholtz said he disclosed it to the Utah Democratic Party Convention to be transparent, saying that if news broke of her medicinal marijuana use broke afterward it would appear "dishonest" to voters.

 

"We're happy to be the public face for this issue now and we hope it will help Utahns, which is why we got into this race in the first place," he said, hugging his wife.

 

Weinholtz said if elected governor, he would sign a medical marijuana bill. The Utah State Legislature considered the issue earlier this year, but the House did not pass any legislation. The

issue will be back before lawmakers in the interim session.

 

After the disclosure, Weinholtz won the Democratic nomination for governor, defeating challenger Vaughn Cook with 80-percent of the delegate vote.

 

In other convention results, Misty Snow and Jonathan Swinton will face off in a primary race for the Democratic Senate nomination. The winner of that race will go up against incumbent Republican Sen. Mike Lee.

 

 

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I have a question to those who are already using MM for their PD...

 

Aside from symptomatic efficacy of MM or its potential long-term side effects -which are yet unknown- what about practical issues?

 

For a patient who is still working for example,  or who is socially active for the most part of the day, this is an impossible alternative. What am I supposed to do when I go to work? Carry my personal vaporizer with me? inhale pot in front of patients and colleagues? Go to the bathroom for a few tokes when my symptoms return? Get high every 4 hours? How is this compatible with improved quality of life?

 

That said, I am very interested in the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids. And looking forward to isolation of these compounds in drug form, devoid of the unwanted side effects of the herb.

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Christie,

 

From a practical standpoint, you could take it to work as a liquid, a gell, or in food - no need to inhale. Also, just speaking for myself, I am not planning to get high. Enough MM to stop the tremors and not one bit more.

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inhale pot in front of patients and colleagues?

 

Now that I think of it, most patients in the oncology clinic wouldn't mind at all...  8) LOL

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UBCO   posted April 20, 2016 by   Alex Soloducha

 

    UBCO researchers create portable marijuana breathalyzer

 

A small device that easily pairs to a cellphone could help police catch impaired drivers, or keep you from getting behind the wheel drunk or high.

 

The device which was developed by UBC Okanagan researchers tests the smell of your breath and determines if you’re too stoned to drive.

 

UBC Okanagan engineering professor Mina Hoorfar created the microfluidic breath analyzer which detects the presence of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in cannabis, in a person’s breath.

 

 

“It’s very easy to test for THC as it is a big molecule that stays in your breath for a long time,” said Hoorfar, who was recently named UBC Okanagan’s researcher of the year. “There is a period of 12 hours after you have consumed THC when it can still be detected in your breath.”

UBC Okanagan engineeringer in Kelowna. professor Mina Hoorfar and PhD student Mohammad Paknahad created the breathalyzer
 

Hoorfar is the head of the Advanced Thermo-Fluidic Laboratory (AFTL) where she and PhD student Mohammad Paknahad created the breathalyzer.

 

Currently, roadside testing analyzing blood or spit tests holds up results, although THC stays in blood and saliva. Their device, which is about the size of two fingers together, would allow police to find out if a person is impaired within seconds.

 

The device costs about $15 to manufacture and is Bluetooth-enabled so data can be sent directly to a cellphone.

 

According to Hoorfar, the device isn’t just helpful to police, people can also use it to self-monitor their alcohol or marihuana consumption.

 

“People can consciously make the choice to test themselves after they have consumed THC or alcohol,” she said.

 

The breathalyzer was made with a 3D printer at the UBC’s campus in Kelowna. It uses a single gas sensor along with a micrometer deep channel that’s thinner than a strand of hair.

 

Hoorfar said they were spurred to create the product because of the possibility of decriminalization of cannabis in Canada, meaning driving while high would likely become an enforcement matter.

 

The device can also register odours other than THC. It is currently being tested for ketones, meaning diabetics may eventually be able monitor their glucose levels with a breathalyzer rather than a pin prick. The device is also being tested above gas lines, using a drone, to see if it can detect gas leaks.

 

 

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http://seniordirectory.com/articles/info/10-things-seniors-should-know-about-medical-marijuana

 

  10 Things Seniors should know about Medical Marijuana

 

 

Harvest of Tempe is a state licensed medical marijuana dispensary. Our facility is tasteful, organized, and is staffed with friendly knowledgeable people ready to help you.

 

We understand many senior citizens come to us without much information about marijuana as a medicine. Our goal is simple: we want to assist aging adults to improve their quality of life.  There are many misconceptions about medical marijuana, especially among senior citizens. The first step is learning about what we do and the products and services we provide. Harvest of Tempe offers a free new patient orientation class every month during which our medical director, Dr. William Troutt NMD, will discuss risks and benefits, realistic expectations and outcomes, dosages, and different ways of using marijuana (such as edibles, liquid tinctures, topical ointments, and smoking). Dr. Troutt will always make himself available to chat with you and address your specific questions and needs. You do not need a medical marijuana card to attend the orientation and we encourage family and health care workers to attend.

 

  10 Things Seniors should know about Medical Marijuana

 

 

1. Marijuana is SAFER than many commonly prescribed medications

 

Most seniors take prescription drugs on a daily basis. The “side effects” of marijuana are insignificant in comparison to the side effects of many prescription drugs, and not a single person has ever died from a marijuana overdose. An ongoing 30-year study found that a person weighing 140 pounds would have to consume over 4 pounds of marijuana in one sitting to reach toxic levels, and that still would not be a fatal dosage. The powerful anti-oxidant effects of marijuana can provide relief for many disorders including liver inflammation from Hepatitis C, lupus, irritable bowel syndrome, and many other serious medical conditions that all involve inflammation and oxidative damage.

 

  2. Marijuana is not physically addictive

 

Many seniors fear that if they start using marijuana they will become addicted. People can use marijuana daily and then stop “cold turkey”.  Discontinuing the use of marijuana has much the same response as quitting the consumption of coffee. Many people who seek welcome and effective respite from chronic pain, anxiety, and stress use marijuana as a daily medicine.

 

  3. Marijuana can reduce and possibly replace many prescription medications

 

A major complaint of seniors regarding their daily medications is that the first pill often causes side effects that the second one is supposed to “fix.”  "Marijuana's healing properties target various conditions such as inflamed joints, high blood pressure, chronic pain, digestive disorders, constipation, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, cognitive awareness, and more Marijuana has the potential for accentuating the effect of many commonly prescribed drugs (blog.norml.org)." For example, opiate based painkillers are typically enhanced when marijuana is used concurrently, often resulting in a reduction of pharmaceutical medicines.

 

  4. There are many different types, or “strains” of marijuana

 

Growing this plant is not terribly different from gardeners attempting to create the perfect rose or tomato plant.  Each plant has it’s own personality and effects. There are strains that are very helpful for chronic pain relief and strains Some strains can make one feel very focused and energized, while others can be relaxing and help with a good nights sleep.  The major strains of marijuana are Sativa and Indica.  Learn more about about the difference between Sativa and Indica for seniors

 

  5. There are marijuana strains without “the high”

 

“If I could get the medical benefit from the plant without the high, I’d consider it.” said many of the seniors we’ve spoken to.  Harvest cultivators have developed and are currently producing potent CBD genetic strains that have minimal psychoactive effect.  CBD, or cannabidiol, is tremendous for inflammation, eases pain, stimulates bone growth, suppresses muscular spasms, reduces anxiety, and increases mental focus. Harvest currently carries liquid extracts that have no “high” at all. These have proven extremely successful for persons suffering from arthritis pain, nausea, and muscle spasms.

 

  6. There are ways to use marijuana other than smoking it

 

One common misconception among aging adults is that they have to smoke marijuana to gain the medicinal benefits. Harvest of Tempe provides liquid extracts, infused honey,candies, baked goods, and other products to choose from. Marijuana can be added to just about any regular recipe in the form of marijuana infused butters or oils. This opens up so many options for your medicine.

 

  7. Marijuana-infused ointments can be very effective in alleviating arthritis and neuropathy pain

 

Locally made, medicated creams are very popular for sore joints and muscles and back pain. They are very effective, smell nice and give a you no “high” so you can feel comfortable using the products throughout the day.

 

  8. Marijuana does not lower your IQ or cause brain damage

 

Another common misconception aging adults have with marijuana is that can lower intelligence or cause brain damage . There is no documentation that shows that marijuana reduces or “kills brain cells.” Studies with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients indicate that marijuana gradually encourages new neural pathways, allowing those with impaired brain function to potentially halt further degeneration and even encourage brain function.

 

  9. Marijuana can help increase your appetite

 

One of the most dangerous health risks among senior citizens is the loss of appetite, leading to weight loss. Marijuana has been extremely successful in alleviating nausea and as an appetite stimulant. That being said, A new study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds an intriguing connection between marijuana use and body weight, showing that rates of obesity are lower by roughly a third in people who smoke marijuana at least three times a week, compared with those who don’t use marijuana at all.

 

  10. The stigma around medical marijuana use is fading

 

Seniors are the fastest growing population of new medical marijuana users. There is no other reason for this other than it is working work for them. If you are in discomfort or chronic pain and would like other options. Those options consist of an organically and locally grown herb that is 3rd party tested, legal in the state of Arizona and can be purchased from a conscientious and responsible business that will provide you with friendly service and education. Medical marijuana can be a valuable tool in your “wellness toolbox”. The Harvest of Tempe is here to help.

Edited by lethe

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http://seniordirectory.com/articles/info/10-things-seniors-should-know-about-medical-marijuana

 

  Another common misconception aging adults have with marijuana is that can lower intelligence or cause brain damage . There is no documentation that shows that marijuana reduces or “kills brain cells.” Studies with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients indicate that marijuana gradually encourages new neural pathways, allowing those with impaired brain function to potentially halt further degeneration and even encourage brain function.

Let's hope so!

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I'm find it interesting that Montel claims pwp don't get the same euphoria from cannabis as folks without Parkinson's.  I find that true when drinking an alcoholic beverage.  My experience prior to P is different than it is now.  I've often wondered if others with P have noticed the same?  Despite growing up in the Woodstock era, I'm a new comer to cannabis.  Consequently, I don't have a before and after to compare it to.  If I consume too much of either, I will have many of the signs of over indulgence but feeling high or euphoric is not among them.  Bearing that in mind, I have no desire to "get high" - I just want to reach that sweet spot where I notice some relief but still have good command over myself.  I'm curious if this is more common than not among us pwp,    

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 06:37 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19839934

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 2009 Dec;8(6):432-9.

Cannabinoids and Parkinson's disease.
García-Arencibia M, García C, Fernández-Ruiz J.
Source

Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040-Madrid, Spain.
Abstract

Cannabinoid-based medicines have been proposed as clinically promising therapies in Parkinson's disease (PD), given the prominent modulatory function played by the cannabinoid signaling system in the basal ganglia. Supporting this pharmacological potential, the cannabinoid signaling system experiences a biphasic pattern of changes during the progression of PD. Thus, early and presymptomatic stages, characterized by neuronal malfunctioning but little evidence of neuronal death, are associated with desensitization/downregulation of CB(1) receptors. It was proposed that these losses may be part of the pathogenesis itself, since they can aggravate different cytotoxic insults which are controlled in part by cannabinoid signals, mainly excitotoxicity but also oxidative stress and glial activation. By contrast, intermediate and, in particular, advanced stages of parkinsonism characterized by a profound nigral degeneration and occurrence of major parkinsonian symptoms (e.g. bradykinesia), are associated with upregulatory responses of CB(1) receptors, possibly CB(2) receptors too, and the endocannabinoid ligands for both receptor types.

 

This would explain the motor inhibition typical of this disease and the potential proposed for CB(1) receptor antagonists in attenuating the bradykinesia typical of PD. In addition, certain cannabinoid agonists have been proposed to serve as neuroprotective molecules in PD, given their well-demonstrated capability to reduce excitotoxicity, calcium influx, glial activation and, in particular, oxidative injury that cooperatively contribute to the degeneration of nigral neurons. However, the potential of cannabinoid-based medicines in PD have been still scarcely studied at the clinical level despite the existence of solid and promising preclinical evidence. Considering the relevance of these preclinical data, the need for finding treatments for motor symptoms that may be alternative to classic dopaminergic replacement therapy, and the lack of efficient neuroprotective strategies in PD, we believe it is of major interest to develop further studies that allow the promising expectations generated for these molecules to progress from the present preclinical evidence towards a real clinical application

 

 

 

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This sounds promising. Unfortunately, people that are living with PD today simply don't have the time for the idiots in the Federal Government to decide that marijuana is not heroin and then a bunch of technocrats to decide that marijuana slows or stops the progression of PD. People living with PD now need to slow or stop the progression of their PD NOW.

 

The good news is that with an ever-increasing number of states approving medical marijuana, we should soon have a large repository of anecdotal evidence regarding the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of MM.

Edited by PatriotM

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I'm find it interesting that Montel claims pwp don't get the same euphoria from cannabis as folks without Parkinson's.  I find that true when drinking an alcoholic beverage.  My experience prior to P is different than it is now.  I've often wondered if others with P have noticed the same?  Despite growing up in the Woodstock era, I'm a new comer to cannabis.  Consequently, I don't have a before and after to compare it to.  If I consume too much of either, I will have many of the signs of over indulgence but feeling high or euphoric is not among them.  Bearing that in mind, I have no desire to "get high" - I just want to reach that sweet spot where I notice some relief but still have good command over myself.  I'm curious if this is more common than not among us pwp,    

 

 

    If you just take enough to replace the dopamine as well as the other natural chemicals, then you would  not feel high, but more than that and you will get some mild euphoria. This is desireable in people who suffer from stuff like depression, apathy, anxiety and who need that extra boost.

 

Because of the intensity of my symptoms (and the fact that I have slow stomach motility) as well as having smoked  for many years I have to use a large amount. As an example, If I cut down on the amount I consume my tremors will increase.....  It takes me a while of vaping before I start feeling mild euphoria.  Up until that point I do feel effects, but not necessarily euphoria.

 

As MM gains credibility hopefully a language will evolve that is able to express the wide psychological “headspaces” and experiences - inner space, the final frontier.  :)

 

In the 60's when “consciousness expansion” and exploration were popular the term (ASC) “Altered State of Consciousness” was used in attempt. to explore these subtle states.

 

And though these days I’m slowing down on vaping, there are times when “heavy” medication is needed. After I had my very bad reaction to meds and went from a few mild symptoms to strong physical impairment I was very self-concious in public and it helped to get very “stoned’ to go out in public.

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Hey Lethe,

 

If you haven't tried it yet, add some CBD in with your mix. Whether it's a tincture before you vape or add some CBD flowers/wax in your mix. I have felt that it works by itself to repair from THC as well as it works symbiotically together. I feel that I need less with CBD in the mix. It also works to knock out the paranoia (it is very anti-anxiety) effect of high amounts of THC (if I go overboard vaping). Since I started using a tincture in daily rountine, I feel much more balanced and the effects of vaping seems to last longer. After one year of daily use, I still only need a small amount.

Edited by Stiffler

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Stiffler,

 

Have you tried any of the strains high in CBD?  What did you think of them?  I've been using Cannatonic (7.6 THC, 15.8 CBD) for quite some time and recently got new (new to me) one called Mob Boss (9 THC, 18 CBD).  It's harder to go overboard with the Cannatonic, but I am slightly less sleepy with the Mob Boss and like the taste and smell for a change (when compared to the Cannatonic). 

 

Do you use on a fixed schedule or as needed?  I'm just looking for some direction as for the most part it has been trial and error.  I use an ipuff and as a general rule only take two tokes.  I only take as needed - usually 1 or 2 times a day.  I try not to take it at all if I know I'm going to be driving.

 

I've tried the just the CBD tincture alone but have never tried it in combination with the ipuff.  What is your daily routine?   

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