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lethe

medical marijuana

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Rocki    35

I agree, as a practicing nurse I could lose my license and be forced to go to a 5 year follow up program if I'm caught with Marijuana. My MDS is against it since a. it may only last a few hours (remind you of any drug we may know?) or b. it has a placebo effect and works because we we want it to. He then told me that the azilect was really working for me in slowing progression. Got angry when I replied "Placebo effect?

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Stiffler    13

I agree, as a practicing nurse I could lose my license and be forced to go to a 5 year follow up program if I'm caught with Marijuana. My MDS is against it since a. it may only last a few hours (remind you of any drug we may know?) or b. it has a placebo effect and works because we we want it to. He then told me that the azilect was really working for me in slowing progression. Got angry when I replied "Placebo effect?

Rocki, I'm sorry to hear that. I microdose during the day and most of the time the effects last 4 hours. Who gives a $hit if it's only 2, micro a bit more. The crap they want to feed us... grrr, pisses me off. Can you go to work for a functional medicine doctor or a practice where they don't care? Sometimes I feel just like that woman in the video. Two puffs and ahhhhh.... quite a release from pain and rigidity. Early on I had always felt like the inside of my brain was getting a massage. I think this was the inflammation easing. I don't get that feeling as much but generally I feel better overall than before I started cannabis and likely have less inflammation going on is my guess.

 

I wish you could feel it!!

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jsaltsgaver    6

We live in a state where they're still screwing around with the MM legislation.  A friend of mine has a sister with state 4 cancer who has used "the real thing" with great success.  She game me a small amount to see if it helps us.  The last time I smoked a joint was 40 years ago, so I'm completely out of the lingo loop.  I've tried to take notes about what to buy, but it would be really nice if someone would give me a list of things as a starter kit.  I don't want to spend a bunch of money until I know it will help and I'd like to keep it as simple as possible for now.  I guess I would just go to a smoke shop and ask for X, Y, and Z?  Help??

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wilsons66604    35

We live in a state where they're still screwing around with the MM legislation.  A friend of mine has a sister with state 4 cancer who has used "the real thing" with great success.  She game me a small amount to see if it helps us.  The last time I smoked a joint was 40 years ago, so I'm completely out of the lingo loop.  I've tried to take notes about what to buy, but it would be really nice if someone would give me a list of things as a starter kit.  I don't want to spend a bunch of money until I know it will help and I'd like to keep it as simple as possible for now.  I guess I would just go to a smoke shop and ask for X, Y, and Z?  Help??

There has been a lot of talk on here about the machines to process the herb but I am partial to the old school ways.

Here is a short article that may help with the vocabulary..

 

A Bic lighter and a small pipe keeps it simple. 

 

I recently came upon several samples of legally packaged buds. They ranged in THC & CBD content so I've been trying to determine what works best for me.

I really like the buds with no THC content ("Sour Tsunami" THC 0% CBD 18.93%). I don't get stoned but it calms me & my tremors. Similar results with the buds containing THC but I get that stoned effect...that helps me sleep.

Edited by wilsons66604

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PENNYBUTLER    2

This is a very long thread with much info, so forgive me if the answer to my question is hidden in the many posts and I just missed it. That being said, I have zero experience and would like to know how many of you use mm for sleep issues. I recall someone posting something about 1/4 brownie before bed, but that's it. I am very sleep deprived. Fall asleep just fine, but wake up in an hour. The anxiety I am feeling since diagnosis isn't helping. I believe that if I could just get some sleep I would be better prepared to deal with the beast that is PD. Any suggestions on what might help?

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Feisty Folder    162

I don't use MM personally. What I do use is catnip, it's incredible how well it works to help me get a decent nights rest. I also know that several people on this forum use melatonin for sleep. As for MM, hopefully someone with experience can give you some guidance.

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Stiffler    13

This is a very long thread with much info, so forgive me if the answer to my question is hidden in the many posts and I just missed it. That being said, I have zero experience and would like to know how many of you use mm for sleep issues. I recall someone posting something about 1/4 brownie before bed, but that's it. I am very sleep deprived. Fall asleep just fine, but wake up in an hour. The anxiety I am feeling since diagnosis isn't helping. I believe that if I could just get some sleep I would be better prepared to deal with the beast that is PD. Any suggestions on what might help?

 

I use cannabis for pain, rigidity, tremor, and sleep!

 

Indica strains are better for sleeping. Strains high in CBN help you sleep. If you are in a legal state, look for CBN in the test results. THC converts to CBN as it degrades (old weed makes you sleepy) If you are not, try just about anything. Take a few puffs in the evening. Release your pain, rigidity and sleep will come easy. Before cannabis, I was having a heck of a time sleeping. It really helps for me.

 

There are energizing sativas as well. Stay away from them if you can. IMHO you'll likely find hybrids on the streets (they are easier to grow than straight sativas).

 

A 1/4 brownie might do nothing or it might make you very uncomfortable. Be careful with edibles, they can really come on strong. Edibles last longer but to me it's easier to dose in a tincture, vape or smoke.

 

https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/what-is-cbn-and-what-are-the-benefits-of-this-cannabinoid

Edited by Stiffler

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lethe    199
saving countless lives.

 

As the DEA contemplates whether or not to reschedule marijuana based on its potential medicinal value, those states that have already legalized medicinal cannabis have witnessed a dramatic decline in prescriptions written for antidepressants and painkillers; dropping by approximately 1,800 daily doses.

 

“The researchers found that in states with medical marijuana laws on the books, the number of prescriptions dropped for drugs to treat anxiety, depression, nausea, pain, psychosis, seizures, sleep disorders and spasticity. Those are all conditions for which marijuana is sometimes recommended.”

 

Thanks to the infinite hypocrisy of our federal government, which still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 narcotic while holding a patent on the plant’s cannabinoids, physicians in MMJ states are restricted from prescribing medicinal cannabis; However, they can write a recommendation for it. As such, insurance plans are currently unable to cover the cost – at least for now.

 

“If the DEA made marijuana a Schedule II drug, the move would put it in the company of drugs such as morphine and oxycodone, making it easier for doctors to prescribe and more likely that insurance would cover it.”

 

While recreational pot smokers, patients, and scientists sit on the political sideline of the rescheduling debate, anxiously waiting for the feds to wake up and remove cannabis from its restrictive classification, many of today’s forward-thinking politicians are pressing the DEA to reschedule marijuana now

 

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lethe    199
 
(Honest folks...... I didn't make this one up)
 
Extensive Early Cannabis Use Mitigates Effects of ‘ES’ on Neurocognitive Performance

 

By Monterey Bud on July 8, 2016

Health & Medicine, Studies

 

And yet another study demonstrates the beautiful synergistic interplay between our endocannabinoid system and marijuana’s many cannabinoids.

 

Thanks to the diligent work by our cannabis loving friends at the University of Haifa, there’s new research indicating a prolific use of cannabinoids during early adulthood can reverse the vile effects of “Early life stress (ES)” on our neurocognitive performance.

 

 

While I would imagine there would be minimal ES for those early extensive users (ages 18 – 25), on June 17thPubMed.gov confirmed the obvious:

 

reverse the effects of early stress on neurocognitive performance in adulthood.”

 

After first warning of the debilitating effects of ES on our neurocognitive performance; “significantly increases predisposition to psychopathologies,” the report then quantifies the potential benefits of marijuana consumption during late adolescence, and how that might reverse the long-term effects of ES on our neurocognitive function later in life.

 

The Israeli study suggests that males and females who consume “extensive” amounts of cannabis during “late adolescence” could thwart ES and its “impaired performance in short-term memory in adulthood.”

 

Chalking up another one for the home team, the study concluded: “There is a crucial role of the endocannabinoid system in the effects of early life stress on behavior at adulthood.”

 

As the threatened hoards of Big Pharma CEOs look down on this type of scientific research, yet another recent study found marijuana “innocent” of causing any long-term health issues in teens that smoke habitually.

 

That sounds like a win-win to me…

 

 

 

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Shaker Dave    37

Some good news From MJFF:

 

MJFF Signs Letter Supporting Medical Cannabis Research

 

by Allyse Falce,

July 13, 2016

 

 

 

On July 12, The Michael J. Fox Foundation joined a group of 13 patient advocacy organizations asking for greater research freedom around medical cannabis. The group sent a letter to key leadership in the U.S. House and Senate urging them to move forward with the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States (CARERS) Act, which would lift barriers to medical cannabis research in the United States.

 

The full text of the letter can be found below.

 

The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism will hold a hearing on medical marijuana on July 13.

 

Read our Ask the MD blog for more information on medical marijuana and Parkinson's disease.

 

Dear Senators Grassley and Leahy and Representatives Pitts and Green:

 

On behalf of the patient community, we, the undersigned organizations, urge you to allow a committee vote for the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States Act (CARERS, S.683, H.R. 1538) which would facilitate safe and legal access to medical cannabis for patients and physicians acting in accordance with state law and lift federal barriers to research.

 

Our organizations advocate for the millions of Americans living with the various severe and debilitating medical conditions that our organizations respectively represent. We have seen firsthand the devastation that these conditions can inflict upon patients and their loved ones. This is why we are committed to exploring and advocating for all potential treatment options, including medical cannabis for those individuals who could benefit from its therapeutic use.

 

The CARERS Act would lift barriers that have prevented medical cannabis research in the United States. Due to the onerous restrictions on cannabis, the U.S. is restricting innovation rather than cultivating it. Moving cannabis from Schedule I in the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and ending the Drug Enforcement Agency-mandated National Institute on Drug Abuse monopoly on the research supply would lift major federal barriers to medical cannabis research. The CARERS Act would also remove low-THC cannabis from the CSA allowing individuals in states that have created protections for low-THC therapies to more easily access this potential treatment option.

 

Not everyone should or would use medical cannabis as a treatment option, and further research is needed on the connection between cannabis and the conditions we represent. But medical cannabis may be the best alternative for some individuals when other options have failed or come with significant side effects that impact health, quality of life, and ability to stay on a medication. We urge you to allow the CARERS Act a vote in your respective committees. Only the CARERS Act would provide the necessary safe and legal access and protection for patients while removing federal barriers to research that can improve the safety and efficacy of medical cannabis treatments.

 

If you have any questions, please contact Steph Sherer, executive director of Americans for Safe Access, at steph@safeaccessnow.org.

 

Sincerely,

 

Americans for Safe Access

Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE)

Danny Did Foundation

Epilepsy Foundation

Finding a Cure for Epilepsy and Seizures (FACES)

Hope4Harper

Hope for Hypothalamic Hamartomas

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) Foundation

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

National Women's Health Network

Realm of Caring

The Michael J. Fox Foundation

Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance

 

TAGS: Public Policy

 

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Shaker Dave    37

Medical Marijuana for Central Nervous System Disorders

July 25, 2016

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

PHOTO CREDIT: MEDICAL MARIJUANA INC.

 

We just discussed cannabis' neuroprotective properties in relation to the central nervous system (CNS). Now, we'll talk about how it can manage the symptoms associated with various central nervous system disorders.

 

Cannabis helps fight Alzheimer's disease by slowing the production of beta-amyloid proteins and thereby the progression of the disease, by protecting brain cells from the deleterious effects of amyloid beta, by reducing inflammation, and by enhancing the birth of new cells in order to facilitate brain repair. Dystonia patients could benefit from a reduction of involuntary muscle contractions. By reducing or eliminating seizures, CBD can help those who suffer from epilepsy. Studies have found fibromyalgia patients witness improvements in sleep disruption, pain, depression, joint stiffness, anxiety, physical function, and overall quality of life.

 

Cannabis' analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties may offer relief for patients with lupus. Its analgesic property could also inhibit the pain response produced by migraines. Patients with Multiple Sclerosis benefit from cannabis' ability to reduce pain and muscle spasms, and one study on animals found cannabinoids even provided neuroprotection by reducing damage to the myelin caused by inflammation. The progression of Parkinson's disease is reduced thanks to cannabis' neuroprotective effects and benefits on cell health. Parkinson's disease patients have even been able to better manage tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia, motor disability and impairments, and sleep problems. Lastly, cannabis reduces tics from Tourette syndrome.

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wilsons66604    35

Can you provide a link to the original article please?

Medical Marijuana for Central Nervous System Disorders
July 25, 2016
Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.
PHOTO CREDIT: MEDICAL MARIJUANA INC.
 

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Shaker Dave    37

ttp://www.cannabestmedical.com/cannabest-medical-blog/2016/7/18/medical-marijuana-for-central-nervous-system-disorder

 

Hopefully this link works for you.

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lethe    199
 
 
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THC-A Crystalline: The Strongest Hash in the World?
By Allie Beckett on July 25, 2016

420, Concentrates, Dabs, Education

 

There’s a new kid on the block; her name is Crystalline, and she’s from the Hash Family.

 

Crystalline hash is the latest craze in the hash community, and everyone wants a taste. The demand is so high that THC-A Crystalline is going for $200 a gram in southern California dispensaries.

 

Testing in at an astonishing 99.9% THC, Crystalline is officially the strongest hash on the market. Other concentrates such as ice hash, rosin, and BHO range from 50-80% THC.

 

Cannabis concentrates are known for their variety of textures and forms, from shatter to wax to crumble, there’s something for everyone to enjoy. What many extract lovers don’t realize is that these various textures develop from the solvent used to make the concentrate and the methods of purging the solvent out of the final product. However, when THC is reduced to its purest state, it crystallizes, creating crystal ‘rocks’ which look very different than any other marijuana concentrate on the market.

 

Crysaline turns many people off just because of its looks. The internet is filled with scornful reviews of its meth-like appearance, and this criticism is entirely valid.  But don’t judge a book by its cover because cannabis crystalline is the purest form of THC and provides sufficient relief for many patients suffering from debilitating and fatal illnesses. And hey, it’s not THC’s fault that it’s a compound with a crystal structure.

 

Guild Extracts, a Southern California extraction company, is the current leader of crystalline production. Their crystallizing process is kept under lock and key, but they claim the ability to make THC-A Crystalline out of any starting material ranging from hydrocarbon extract, CO2 extract, and ice water concentrate. One thing Guild Extracts has made clear is that they are not using a solvent to create this hash, rather, they are extracting pure THC from their starting materials.

 

You may be wondering, what exactly is THC-A Crystalline? Well, before THC is combusted (lit on fire or vaporized) it sits in its raw acidic form, also known as THC-A. THC-A by itself is completely inactive, meaning if it is ingested it will not get you high (but it does have an extraordinary amount of medicinal benefits). When THC-A is activated through heat in a process called decarboxylation, the acidic carbon atom (the “A” in THC-A) is removed leaving behind the psychoactive THC that so many of us know and love.

 

Now remember, this pure THC does not contain terpenes (the magical compounds that give cannabis strains their distinctive aroma and flavor profiles while contributing to their therapeutic effects). To make up for the lack of flavor, Guild Extracts has become famous for the “dip n dab,” dipping the crystalline concentrate into terpenes extracted from strains like Goji OG, Tangie, and Sherbert.

 

While the sky-high potency may scare some away, THC-A Crystalline provides a surprisingly clean, focused, and inspired high. Plus, health nuts can rest easy knowing that THC-A Crystalline is completely free of any chemical inputs (think butane).

 

 

About Author

Allie Beckett

 

Allie is a NW-based content curator for Marijuana.com and an organic farmer at TKO Reserve. She has been a professional in the marijuana industry since she was 18 years old, spending the first five years of her career working for Dope Magazine as lead photographer. Allie has worked on mainstream projects such as Idiot's Guide: Growing Marijuana, Branding Bud: The Consumerization of Cannabis and her own self-published book, As The Grass Grows.

 

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