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lethe

medical marijuana

745 posts in this topic

Firstly thanks for the background and comprehensive reply. I am glad for you that you have had relief from so many symptoms. It is clearly a complex topic. A couple of follow up points:

1. Regarding the efficacy of mm as a treatment option: I looked at a few of the you tube posts and it appears that the medical focus appears to be on a few specific areas of neurological outcomes. At least where I could stretch my little Aussie brain around the breadth of discussion.

2. IMHO there is also significant confusion around this topic. Based on my experience i tend to be cautious of "cure all" outcomes - I have been disappointed in the past when trying to get the same outcomes for myself. Perhaps I missed this part of the discussion but I could not find any background on Pharmacieutical companies driving/lobbying from this traditionally lobby ready industry to move the govn on this issue. Let's not forget that the FDA is not without bias and is subject to influence. I also don't get why my money grubbing friends in the pharma industry aren't all over mm if it has such broad appeal and offers such a range symptom relief.

 

In my own experience suffering with PD for the past 4 years is that maj was somewhat helpful when I could no longer stand the pain and needed to separate my brain from my body it was a helpful alternative to opioids. I struggled however, with the blunting side effects. If it is to be legalized, again IMHO there needs to be some help from big pharma to get the recipe right.

 

Lethe your knowledge of the strains, usage and efficacy paths in general is amazing and helpful; big pharma could leverage your insight.

 

Big Pharma wants nothing to do with MM because there's no real money in it, plain and simple....

It costs next to nothing to grow and anyone can do it. Also, as MM can replace many pharmaceuticals it threatens their profits.

 

Which side effects are you referring too?

Edited by lethe

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http://tinyurl.com/cs4cvvx

 

Marijuana relieves muscles tightness, pain of multiple sclerosis: Study

Paul Irish Life Reporter

 

Smoking marijuana can relieve muscle tightness, spasticity (contractions) and pain often experienced by those with multiple sclerosis, says research out of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

The findings, just published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, included a controlled trial with 30 participants to understand whether inhaled cannabis would help complicated cases where existing pharmaceuticals are ineffective or trigger adverse side effects.

MS is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain and spinal cord.

The disease attacks the myelin, the protective covering wrapped around the nerves of the central nervous system, and — among other symptoms — can cause loss of balance, impaired speech, extreme fatigue, double vision and paralysis.

The average age of the research participants was 50 years with 63 per cent of the study population female.

More than half the participants needed walking aids and 20 per cent used wheelchairs.

Rather than rely on self-reporting by patients regarding their muscle spasticity — a subjective measure — health professionals rated each patient’s joints on the modified Ashworth scale, a common objective tool to evaluate intensity of muscle tone.

The researchers found that the individuals in the group that smoked cannabis experienced an almost one-third decrease on the Ashworth scale — 2.74 points from a baseline score of 9.3 — meaning spasticity improved, compared to the placebo group.

As well, pain scores decreased by about 50 per cent.

“We saw a beneficial effect of smoked cannabis on treatment-resistant spasticity and pain associated with multiple sclerosis among our participants,” says Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom of the university’s department of neuroscience.

Researchers found that, although generally well-tolerated, the cannabis had the expected short-term but acute cognitive effects.

Corey-Bloom says larger, long-term studies are needed to confirm findings and determine whether lower doses can result in beneficial effects with less cognitive impact.

The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada says Canadians have one of the highest rates of the disease in the world. The disease is the most common neurological diseases affecting young adults in this country and every day three more people in Canada are diagnosed with MS.

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this isnt law enforcement forum

how many of you have tried and have been helped by pot

and what did your neurologist say

it realy works for me but im nervous to use it since I take other drugs and

obviously have a hurt brain already

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http://www.nytimes.c...juana.html?_r=2

 

nytlogo110x16.gif

 

Op-Ed Contributor

 

A Judge’s Plea for Pot

 

By GUSTIN L. REICHBACH

 

Published: May 16, 2012

 

 

THREE and a half years ago, on my 62nd birthday, doctors discovered a mass on my pancreas. It turned out to be Stage 3 pancreatic cancer. I was told I would be dead in four to six months. Today I am in that rare coterie of people who have survived this long with the disease. But I did not foresee that after having dedicated myself for 40 years to a life of the law, including more than two decades as a New York State judge, my quest for ameliorative and palliative care would lead me to marijuana.

 

My survival has demanded an enormous price, including months of chemotherapy, radiation hell and brutal surgery. For about a year, my cancer disappeared, only to return. About a month ago, I started a new and even more debilitating course of treatment. Every other week, after receiving an IV booster of chemotherapy drugs that takes three hours, I wear a pump that slowly injects more of the drugs over the next 48 hours.

 

Nausea and pain are constant companions. One struggles to eat enough to stave off the dramatic weight loss that is part of this disease. Eating, one of the great pleasures of life, has now become a daily battle, with each forkful a small victory. Every drug prescribed to treat one problem leads to one or two more drugs to offset its side effects. Pain medication leads to loss of appetite and constipation. Anti-nausea medication raises glucose levels, a serious problem for me with my pancreas so compromised. Sleep, which might bring respite from the miseries of the day, becomes increasingly elusive.

 

Inhaled marijuana is the only medicine that gives me some relief from nausea, stimulates my appetite, and makes it easier to fall asleep. The oral synthetic substitute, Marinol, prescribed by my doctors, was useless. Rather than watch the agony of my suffering, friends have chosen, at some personal risk, to provide the substance. I find a few puffs of marijuana before dinner gives me ammunition in the battle to eat. A few more puffs at bedtime permits desperately needed sleep.

 

This is not a law-and-order issue; it is a medical and a human rights issue. Being treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, I am receiving the absolute gold standard of medical care. But doctors cannot be expected to do what the law prohibits, even when they know it is in the best interests of their patients. When palliative care is understood as a fundamental human and medical right, marijuana for medical use should be beyond controversy.

 

Sixteen states already permit the legitimate clinical use of marijuana, including our neighbor New Jersey, and Connecticut is on the cusp of becoming No. 17. The New York State Legislature is now debating a bill to recognize marijuana as an effective and legitimate medicinal substance and establish a lawful framework for its use. The Assembly has passed such bills before, but they went nowhere in the State Senate. This year I hope that the outcome will be different. Cancer is a nonpartisan disease, so ubiquitous that it’s impossible to imagine that there are legislators whose families have not also been touched by this scourge. It is to help all who have been affected by cancer, and those who will come after, that I now speak.

 

Given my position as a sitting judge still hearing cases, well-meaning friends question the wisdom of my coming out on this issue. But I recognize that fellow cancer sufferers may be unable, for a host of reasons, to give voice to our plight. It is another heartbreaking aporia in the world of cancer that the one drug that gives relief without deleterious side effects remains classified as a narcotic with no medicinal value.

 

Because criminalizing an effective medical technique affects the fair administration of justice, I feel obliged to speak out as both a judge and a cancer patient suffering with a fatal disease. I implore the governor and the Legislature of New York, always considered a leader among states, to join the forward and humane thinking of 16 other states and pass the medical marijuana bill this year. Medical science has not yet found a cure, but it is barbaric to deny us access to one substance that has proved to ameliorate our suffering.

 

 

Gustin L. Reichbach is a justice of the State Supreme Court in Brooklyn.

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medical marajawana has become yet another wedge issue for partisan gain,

we need to elect moderate politicians who aim for finding the common ground of simply doing what good can be accomplished

and fostering good will to get momentum to do more

after all what sane person wouldent be convinced be previous post, its got to be about something else

scott

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Please pass me one AND PLEASE note the sign at the 2:07 marker. It ought to say PD. lol

 

Edited by Luthersfaith

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Please pass me one AND PLEASE note the sign at the 2:07 marker. It ought to say PD. lol

 

Please pass me one AND PLEASE note the sign at the 2:07 marker. It ought to say PD. lol

 

 

Considering that you're the guy who believes the bible literally and does'nt believe in science or evolution, I suspect you've smoked more than enough of something..... :-P

 

"I have told you these things, so that in Me you may have [perfect] peace and confidence. In the world you have tribulation and trials and distress and frustration; but be of good cheer [take courage; be confident, certain, undaunted]! For I have overcome the world." - Jesus (John 16:33)

 

Modern translation: Don't worry.... be happy! :arrow::-P

Edited by lethe

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Considering that you're the guy who believes the bible literally and does'nt believe in science or evolution, I suspect you've smoked more than enough of something..... :-P

 

Hi there Lethe, I believe in science when it is truly seeking truth and it is not biased. And please remember its the Theory of Evolution not the Fact of Evolution. :wink: And the Bible… some parts are to be taken literally and other parts are symbolic. Basically I believe in the 10 commandments and the fact of the birth, death and resurrection of Jesus.

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Yes… One needs faith to believe a theory. I propose that you need faith to believe in evolution, just like I need faith in the God of the Bible.

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In the past I would of said that I really believe in science. However I was in a rather melancholy mood today. I got to thinking (which can be dangerous) ...anyway I asked myself, What was the last major disease for which a cure was found? I thought maybe Polio back in the 1950's, but it wasn't cured in as much as a preventative was found. There have been some other advancements in prevention and in treatments but can anyone tell me what was the last disease that an actual cure has been discovered? It just seems that with the technological revolution there should be much more advancement in cures or at least much better treatments than there are currently. Assuming that there hasn't been as much advancement in finding cures as there should be, what is slowing the advancement?? Big Pharma and the lack of money to be made by finding a cure...or something else? Thoughts?

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My thoughts: I see this as the problem:

 

Genesis 3:17ff: And to Adam he said,

 

“Because you have listened to the voice of your wife

and have eaten of the tree

of which I commanded you,

‘You shall not eat of it,’

cursed is the ground because of you;

in pain you shall eat of it all the days of your life;

thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for you;

and you shall eat the plants of the field.

By the sweat of your face

you shall eat bread,

till you return to the ground,

for out of it you were taken;

for you are dust,

and to dust you shall return.”

 

We are all under a curse that only God can take away when he returns the second time. Yes there have been, will be and are medical breakthroughs, due to "money and technological revolution" but disease and sickness AND DEATH will not be eradicated until Jesus returns the second time. And when he does, everyone will know it, both the living and the dead. So what is really important? Read John chapter 1 and do all the good you can to comfort those in dis-ease… even if its pot that brings comfort.

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My thoughts: I see this as the problem:

Genesis 3:17ff: And to Adam he said,

“Because you have listened to the voice of your wife

 

Oh yes, blame it on women, sinful creatures that they are....

 

 

re all under a curse that only God can take away when he returns the second time. Yes there have been, will be and are medical breakthroughs, due to "money and technological revolution" but disease and sickness AND DEATH will not be eradicated until Jesus returns the second time. And when he does, everyone will know it, both the living and the dead. So what is really important? Read John chapter 1 and do all the good you can to comfort those in dis-ease… even if its pot that brings comfort.

 

And this is what I hate the most.... being preached at by people whose only source of ìnformation is that hodge-podge of texts called the bible. Reminds me of those people you see on street corners with glazed looks giving out a religious tract called Àwake``

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Rodney Dangerfield's Lifelong Romance With Marijuana

 

The comedian’s widow gave this talk at the Patients Out of Time conference on cannabis therapeutics in Santa Barbara April 7.

 

If Rodney were here today he would say something brilliant. He would probably open with a marijuana joke. He’d say, “I tell ya, that marijuana really has an effect on you. The other day I smoked a half a joint and I got so hungry, I ate the other half.”

 

Rodney had a fantastically unique mind. Few people knew he was a mathematical genius, but everyone knew he was hilarious. His humor was a razor thrust into social hypocrisy and the little injustices of life. He wrote “killers” and made the world laugh.

 

Another thing that was not widely known about Rodney is that he endured quite a bit of personal suffering in his life. He was heartbreakingly neglected as a child. We’ve all heard the expression “the tears of a clown,” and in many ways Rodney embodied that experience. Like most geniuses, the special chemistry that created his remarkable mind also created certain psychological challenges. Acute anxiety and manic depression were congenital issues that plagued Rodney’s life.

 

To give you an idea of how his anxiety would manifest itself, Rodney couldn’t sit still. In Caddyshack, his character, Al Cervic, is constantly fidgeting like he’s about to burst out of his skin. The truth is, this was no act. Rodney was under duress. He felt Chevy Chase was talking too slowly and it got on his nerves. Rodney’s impatience would come out through his body. The pace of the whole world was too slow for him until he found marijuana.

 

Rodney first lit up back in 1942 when he was 21. He was hanging out with a comic named Bobby Byron and his friend Joe E. Ross —some of you might remember Joe E. Ross from Car 54. They went to the Belvedere Hotel in New York where Bobby lived. The night would prove to have such an impact on Rodney’s life that he even remembered the room number they were in —1411.

 

Although he was supposed to be enjoying himself with friends, Rodney was characteristically agitated and anxiety ridden. It’s how he felt every day of his life to that point. But when Rodney got high, he couldn’t believe it.

 

For the first time in his life, he left relaxed and peaceful, and had a sense of well-being. That night marijuana became a new friend that would be in Rodney’s life for the next 62 years.

 

I met Rodney in 1983, and after a 10-year courtship, Rodney and I enjoyed 11 years of marriage. I must admit that when I became a part of Rodney’s life, I did not approve of his marijuana use. My Mormon background hadn’t given me experience with any illegal substances and I was always afraid Rodney would get arrested.

 

Rodney was concerned about my feelings and agreed to look for legal alternatives to treat his ailments. Over the years we consulted the best experts we could find in search of legal anti-anxiety and pain medications and even tried Marinol. But nothing worked for him the way real marijuana did.

 

A couple of years ago Rodney was in the process of writing his autobiography, in which he wanted to be very candid about everything in his life. He even wanted to title the book “My Lifelong Romance with Marijuana.”

 

I was sure then that Rodney would be arrested. So I looked for, and found, Dr. David Bearman here in Santa Barbara.

 

Dr. Bearman examined Rodney and obtained records from Rodney’s other doctors for review. In addition to his anxiety and depression, at the time Rodney’s medical conditions included constant pain from the congenital fusion of his spine, an inoperable dislocated shoulder and rotator-cuff tear and arthritis. Rodney wasn’t able to take traditional pain medications because of their interactions with his blood-thinning medication, Coumadin.

 

We were elated a few days after that initial visit with Dr. Bearman when Rodney’s medicinal use was approved. Rodney showed the approval letter to everyone and carried miniature versions in his pockets. Ever the worried wife, I included a copy of the letter in the memory box of his casket in case the feds were waiting for him at the Pearly Gates.

 

Even though Rodney endured numerous health challenges over the years, including aneurysms, heart surgeries and a brain bypass, he remained active and vital during his last incredible year. He swam regularly, went on a multi-city press tour to promote his best-selling book (the publisher made him change the title to “It’s Not Easy Bein’ Me”), recorded an album of love songs called “Romeo Rodney,” and wrote countless new jokes.

 

After all those years of pot smoking, his memory and his joke-writing ability did not suffer and his lungs were okay. He was as sharp as ever.

 

Even moments after brain surgery Rodney didn’t miss a beat. Rodney’s doctor came to his bedside after he was taken off the respirator. He said, “Rodney, are you coughing up much?” And Rodney said, “Last week, five-hundred for a hooker.”

 

Some of you may be aware that 4:20 is a symbolic time of day for many marijuana enthusiasts. About a year after Rodney’s brain surgery, he had heart surgery and due to complications his life

ended... Coincidentally, or perhaps meaningfully, at 4:20 p.m. EST.

 

By Joan Dangerfield

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Wow! This went from MM to religion...... I believe your life is what you make of it. Not what is wrote down and altered over the years.

 

How's the saying go?

 

 

Insanity is believing your hallucinations are real, Religion is believing other peoples hallucinations are real!

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Hi there,

Awake when I should be asleep...I found the question posed by Cynthia very thought provoking. I actually think that mother nature is the one true force to be reckoned with. I know that generally we are living longer and deemed healthier than past generations. But to me our existence seems so unhealthily at times. The worlds population is growing all the time. Our government seems obsessed with 'economic growth'. Why? What is so wrong with staying still? We seem to push and push for more all the time...with an unhealthy obsession to keep people alive at any cost to the individual or the planet. I know that sounds callous and actually I'm not...but when you step back and consider things it does appear that we have gone a long way to disturb the natural balance of things.

 

I believe that the laws of natural selection mean that many of us in reality should not have survived to pass our weaker genes onto our kids. But because of modern living and our 'humanity', we have. But the world that we live in is over populated, polluted and stressful. I think it is no wonder we are ill. I know this doesn't tackle the question of why there is no cure...I don't know enough about the way the pharmaceutical companies work to really have a view on that. But as I lay here with my phone charger beside me and my computer waiting at the office and a myriad of chemical products everywhere I am not so surprised that my brain is not working properly :-(

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To get back on topic.... I have used MM. What it does for me is relaxes me and reduces the tremors. I also have a very hard time sleeping beyond 2-4 hours so if I smoke a little before bed time, I relax and sleep around 6-7 hours. The only side affects other than relaxing is hunger and thirst. I am not an addictive person so I don't crave it. I take Mirtazapine and Zolpidem that do nothing but make me fall asleep just to wake in a few hours and feel like crap the rest of the night and the next day. I would rather deal with thirst and hunger over the side effects of these drugs.

My doctor is always concerned about addiction but is also aware of the side effects and quality of life that comes with the use of any drugs. He always ask's me what I want and how strong of a dose I want. After all, it is MY choice!!

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Hello williamg! I also use marijuana to help me relax and sleep. When I get extreme anxiety it calms me down and stops the internal tremors that I get. I too tried the Mirtazapine but ended up with horrible dreams in the few hours that I did sleep during the night, then was exhausted and could hardly get up for the next 24 hours. My doctors all know I use marijuana and they are fine with it. I don't use it every day either, just when I find I really want a longer sleep or the anxiety hits.

 

Deanna

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Hey BillyG, welcome.

 

I used to have a closed mind against Mjane but I think after listening to those that use it, well it could happen some day.

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