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woodbee

N-acetyl cysteine

10 posts in this topic

Hi Mark,

 

Do you have any experience or knowledge on dosing with N-acetyl cysteine...is it safe to use with PD meds, (agonists and sinemet)and if so are you aware of an appropriate dosage to start with? I have read recently that it can help to dampen compulsive behaviors.

 

Thanks in advance Mark

 

Eileen

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The profile of n-acetyl cysteine (nca) does not how any interaction with sinemet or dopamine agonists. The information is limited because no major study has been done...yet.

NCA is found at high levels in high protein foods. The protein can compete with the medications for metabolism by the liver. So, it may be a good idea to separate the Meds by a couple of hours of the NCA.

As far as dosing for PD, no real limit has been set. The usual dose is between 500 and 1200 mg per day.

Below is an article I found in Advanced Health and Life Extension magazine. Not a regulated health magazine, but some good info you might be interested in.

      N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) is a metabolite of the sulfur-containing amino acid, Cysteine. Cysteine is found in high protein foods, N-Acetyl Cysteine is not. N-Acetyl Cysteine is produced within the human body. Cysteine plays a role in the sulfation cycle, acting as a sulfur donor in phase II detoxification and as a methyl donor in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Cysteine also helps synthesize glutathione, one of the body's most important natural antioxidants and detoxifiers. N-Acetyl-Cysteine is the acetylated form of L-Cysteine.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine increases Glutathione Levels

 

      N-Acetyl Cysteine is rapidly metabolized to intracellular glutathione. Glutathione acts as a powerful antioxidant in the body. Glutathione also detoxifies chemicals into less harmful compounds. N-Acetyl Cysteine also protects the body from acetaminophen toxicity and is used in hospitals for patients with acetaminophen poisoning. It has also been shown to be effective at treating liver failure from other causes as well.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine Chelates Heavy Metals

 

      Heavy metals like lead, mercury and arsenic are detoxified and removed from the body by N-Acetyl Cysteine . It also increases the excretion of zinc and other essential minerals when taken over an extended period. It is therefore necessary to supplement zinc, copper and other trace minerals when taking N-Acetyl Cysteine.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine and the Immune System

 

      Glutathione is known to aid in the transport of nutrients to lymphocytes and phagocytes, two major classes of immune cells, and to protect cell membranes. While purified glutathione is available as a dietary supplement, absorption is low, and N-Acetyl Cysteine is thought to be a better method of boosting cellular glutathione levels. N-Acetyl Cysteine is being investigated as a treatment for AIDS.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine Breaks up Mucus

 

      N-Acetyl Cysteine cleaves disulfide bonds by converting them to two sulfhydryl groups. This action results in the breakup of mucoproteins in lung mucus, reducing their chain lengths and thinning the mucus, improving conditions such as bronchitis and flu. Double-blind research has found that N-Acetyl Cysteine supplements improved symptoms and prevented recurrences in people with chronic bronchitis. N-Acetyl Cysteine at a dosage of 1,200 mg per day helps to prevent Influenza infection, reduces the symptoms of existing Influenza infection and reduces the duration of Influenza infections.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine and Cancer

 

      N-Acetyl CysteineN-Acetyl Cysteine has been shown to reduce the proliferation of certain cells lining the colon and may reduce the risk of colon cancer in people with recurrent polyps in the colon. Its action as an antioxidant and a glutathione precursor may also contribute to a protective effect against cancer.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine Cautions

 

      When taking N-acetyl cysteine it is recommended that two to three times as much vitamin C be taken at the same time. Failure to do so may result in more harm than good from taking this product because of the prolonged presence of the oxidized form of L-Cysteine. The vitamin C also helps keep the glutathione that is produced from the Cysteine in its reduced form so that it can continue acting as an antioxidant.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine Dosage

 

      Typical dosage recommendations are in the range of 250-1500mg of NAC daily for the majority of therapeutic benefits.

 

N-Acetyl Cysteine Safety

 

      NAC is considered safe for consumption in its therapeutic dosage ranges. Individual reactions may vary and anyone experiencing adverse symptoms while taking N-Acetyl Cysteine should discontinue it.

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Hi Mark.

 

Thanks so much for that comprehensive answer, I appreciate the time and energy you put into doing the research on that . Eileen

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Any time. Many times we all have the partial answer but with research, we gt the whole answer.

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Mark: what's the relationship, if any, of N-acetyl cysteine to Acetyl-L-Carnitine? where does Glutathione fit in the discussion and, finally, is un-denatured whey supplement worth exploring? My questions arise from reading the following: http://www.kplctv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4073107

I've had PD for three years, do rather well, fatigue being somewhat of an issue. high level of physical activity for a 73 year old. I heard you in SF last Fall and you were really inspiring and informative.

 

Michael

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Robert,

Thanks for the kind words and I am sorry your message got "burried."

Let me check on these 3 and get back with you.

By the way, I had a great time in SF, I would be more than willing to be San Francisco's adopted son. Your group was so infomed and to see so many great caregivers there made this one of the better symposiums I have done.

I would be more than happy to come back anytime, but next time I will bring the family and stay longer.

 

Mark: what's the relationship, if any, of N-acetyl cysteine to Acetyl-L-Carnitine? where does Glutathione fit in the discussion and, finally, is un-denatured whey supplement worth exploring? My questions arise from reading the following: http://www.kplctv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4073107

I've had PD for three years, do rather well, fatigue being somewhat of an issue. high level of physical activity for a 73 year old. I heard you in SF last Fall and you were really inspiring and informative.

 

Michael

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Mark...bumping an old thread.

 

Any contraindications for taking Acetyl L- Carnitine? The profile looks safe from what I can find, and I'm looking into supplements to help stave off some cognitive decline in my mother. Not too bad so far, with some short term memory forgetfulness but obviously I don't want it to escalate and also to not add another Rx to the list.

 

Any other info or suggestions would be appreciated.....thanks very much

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If you give me a list of med, I will be able to give you a more precise answer with more in depth answer.

Thanks in advance.

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Sure....kinda dumb of me to forget to add this :)

 

Stalevo 150/5 per day

Plavix 75mg

Lexapro 20mg/1 per day

Xanax 0.25mg PRN

Pamelor...very very small dosage, but can't recall the exact mg...1/day for sciatic pain

Mucinex

Protonix 60mg/1 per day

Tylenol PRN

 

Assorted supplements....mutil-vitamin gummies, Coq-10 200mg, Cranberry, NAC 500mg/1 per day, Omega 3 500mg/1 per day, Probiotic. and D-Mannose 500mg/1 day to prevent UTI.

 

Age 86 and as I mentioned in the prior post, some short term memory forgetfulness and some very mild occasional confusion.(forgets what day it is, but oriented to time and place, month and year).

Just trying to see if there is anything to add to slow down cognitive decline.....thanks for your help Mark and hope all is well

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There are no interactions between your meds and the n-acetyl carnatine. The one thing I usually recommend is that you separate the natural and the over the counter medications be separated from your prescription by at least 2 hours. The reason for this is that the prescription companies and FDA do not require testing with over the counter meds. That is why I recommend separating them by 2hours to make sure there is no interaction.

As product a Dr might prescribe for memory loss might , or the start of memory loss, might be Exelon. First the Dr would probably run some memory tests, then decide from there if it is appropriate to prescribe anything or not.

Hope this helps.

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