Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
emilyc

counterrearctions of drugs and supplements in pd plus hypothyroidism

Recommended Posts

Dear Mark,

I am 57 years old .My case is a rather complicated one ,yet not so rare .15 years in pd the last 7 medicated / in menopause since 47 years of age /hypothyroidism since 52 years of age. the medication i am on is

 

For pd symmetrel ( amantadine ) 300mg/day since 2004

requip xl 16mg/day since 2005

For hypothyroidism T4 75mg/day since 2006

For menopause food supplement

soya isoflavones 35mg x 6 times/day since 2004 ( my endocrinologist has suggested that dosage )

 

For boosting

general health

in the hope of

alleviating pd symptoms spiroulina 3-4 gr/day since March 2011

 

All this time I have noticed that

1. Amantadine is still the most effective of the pd drugs I have tried

2. surprisingly , issoflavones seem to play a role in alleviating pd symptoms

3. spirulina makes me feel stronger (unless it is placebo)

 

BUT there is great fluctuation in the severity of my symptoms . there are days when I feel I am not a pdr and others with severe resurgence of the symptoms ( tremor, regidity , and terrible imbalance appear together)

 

The question is : Is there any possibility that isoflavones at such a large dossage trigger any kind of imbalance in thyroid function which in turn might result in tremor and subsequent deterioration of pd symptoms?.( although both my neurologist and my endocrinologist are aware of this dossage)

Apart from that could the amount of spiroulina I take daily affect the condition and the function of my thyroid gland

counteracting with t4 and causing the opposite condition ie hyperthyroidism?

 

thank you for your attention and your patience (too long a post)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a very good question with perfect timing. Many people are looking for alternative forms of protein due to the possibility of hormones being put in the feed of cows and in the meat we eat and the milk we drink from cows. Many times, as you can see in the supermarket, soy is being pushed as a good alternative source of protein.

I am not a hater of the cow or the bean, I am a "just the facts" man. So, since little research has been done with a large group and soy isoflavanoids, I will give you what I know.

Soy is a major source of protein. This type of protein is just like other types of protein in that it get metabolized (broken down) by the liver enzymes. Most of our PD medications also get metabolized by the same enzymes in the liver. Because of this, if soy and most PD Meds (Sinemet, Mirapex, Requip, and amantadine) are taken too close together, they will both compete to be broken down in the liver. This can result in fluctuations in body levels of our PD Meds, which will not allow us a predictable level of medicine in our system, which can cause "off" times.

 The brain uses the amino acids tyrosine or phenylalanine to synthesize key transmitters dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain, brain chemicals that promote alertness and activity. Dopamine is crucial to fine muscle coordination. People whose hands tremble from Parkinson's disease have a diminished ability to synthesize dopamine or low levels of these chemicals. An increased incidence of depression and other mood disorders are associated with low levels of dopamine and norepinephrine. Also, the current scientific consensus on attention-deficit disorder points to a dopamine imbalance.

 The second issue: Soy has been shown to affect tyrosine hydroxylase activity in animals, causing the utilization rate of dopamine to be "profoundly disturbed." When soy lecithin supplements were given throughout perinatal development, they reduced activity in the cerebral cortex and "altered synaptic characteristics in a manner consistent with disturbances in neural function."

At Sweden's Karolinska Institute at the National Institutes of Health researchers are finding a connection between tyrosine hydroxylase activity, thyroid hormone receptors, and depleted dopamine levels in the brain particularly in the substantia nigra, a region associated with the movement difficulties characteristic of PD.

 Tyrosine is crucial to the brain in another way. It's needed for the body to make active thyroid hormones, which are a major physiological regulator of mammalian brain.

 Scientists have known for years that isoflavones in soy products can depress thyroid function, causing goiter (enlarged thyroid gland) and autoimmune thyroid disease. In the early 1960s, goiter and hypothyroidism were reported in infants fed soybean diets. [scientists at the National Center for Toxicological Research showed that the soy isoflavones genistein and daidzein "inhibit thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed reactions essential to thyroid hormone synthesis."

Ok, there is what I know, just a point-counterpoint suggestion. Hope this helps you draw your own conclusi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a study that shows adhd patients have a slight difference in dopamine, as well as epinephrine and serotonin.

The correlation may go deeper. People with PD often experience depression, which could be a result of norepinephrine and serotonin. So, it appears that q variety of chemicals may be involved in PD and ADHD, with a possible overlap in related chemicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a very good question with perfect timing. Many people are looking for alternative forms of protein due to the possibility of hormones being put in the feed of cows and in the meat we eat and the milk we drink from cows. Many times, as you can see in the supermarket, soy is being pushed as a good alternative source of protein.

I am not a hater of the cow or the bean, I am a "just the facts" man. So, since little research has been done with a large group and soy isoflavanoids, I will give you what I know.

Soy is a major source of protein. This type of protein is just like other types of protein in that it get metabolized (broken down) by the liver enzymes. Most of our PD medications also get metabolized by the same enzymes in the liver. Because of this, if soy and most PD Meds (Sinemet, Mirapex, Requip, and amantadine) are taken too close together, they will both compete to be broken down in the liver. This can result in fluctuations in body levels of our PD Meds, which will not allow us a predictable level of medicine in our system, which can cause "off" times.

 The brain uses the amino acids tyrosine or phenylalanine to synthesize key transmitters dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain, brain chemicals that promote alertness and activity. Dopamine is crucial to fine muscle coordination. People whose hands tremble from Parkinson's disease have a diminished ability to synthesize dopamine or low levels of these chemicals. An increased incidence of depression and other mood disorders are associated with low levels of dopamine and norepinephrine. Also, the current scientific consensus on attention-deficit disorder points to a dopamine imbalance.

 The second issue: Soy has been shown to affect tyrosine hydroxylase activity in animals, causing the utilization rate of dopamine to be "profoundly disturbed." When soy lecithin supplements were given throughout perinatal development, they reduced activity in the cerebral cortex and "altered synaptic characteristics in a manner consistent with disturbances in neural function."

At Sweden's Karolinska Institute at the National Institutes of Health researchers are finding a connection between tyrosine hydroxylase activity, thyroid hormone receptors, and depleted dopamine levels in the brain particularly in the substantia nigra, a region associated with the movement difficulties characteristic of PD.

 Tyrosine is crucial to the brain in another way. It's needed for the body to make active thyroid hormones, which are a major physiological regulator of mammalian brain.

 Scientists have known for years that isoflavones in soy products can depress thyroid function, causing goiter (enlarged thyroid gland) and autoimmune thyroid disease. In the early 1960s, goiter and hypothyroidism were reported in infants fed soybean diets. [scientists at the National Center for Toxicological Research showed that the soy isoflavones genistein and daidzein "inhibit thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed reactions essential to thyroid hormone synthesis."

Ok, there is what I know, just a point-counterpoint suggestion. Hope this helps you draw your own conclusi

I know this is an old post but ... I noticed that when I gave my husband phosphatidylserine from soybeans, it had a really negative effect on his Sinemet absorption, even though we waited about 45 minutes after Sinemet before taking it.  Would phosphatidylserine made from sunflowers have the same negative effect?  Any other info that I should look out for?  If we took Rytary, do we have to be equally careful of these things?  Thanks for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not seen as much about sunflower seeds, but I would guess it would be the same. In this case seperate the seeds from the meds by at least two hours before or two hours after the medicine.

Hope this helps, keep me posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×