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jbubnick

voice

5 posts in this topic

I initially had difficulty with amplification. Now i have difficulty making any sound. Even whisperiing .

Also have trouble initiating voice. Seem to have trouble coordinating breathing and speaking. When i do get a word out

the next one wont come without taking another breath , if at all. What do you think i can do?

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I initially had difficulty with amplification. Now i have difficulty making any sound. Even whisperiing .

Also have trouble initiating voice. Seem to have trouble coordinating breathing and speaking. When i do get a word out

the next one wont come without taking another breath , if at all. What do you think i can do?

 

 

I am so sorry to hear how much your ability to communicate has changed. It is not possible for me to say what you should do without seeing you in person. There are exercises that can help. Specifically, LSVT LOUD is an exercise based treatment that has been shown to help people with PD to improve speech characteristics and be easier to understand (Ramig et al., 2001, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry). Other treatment options are also available. You would need an evaluation with a speech-language pathologist who has experience treating people with PD. The evaluation will determine which treatment is right for you based on your individual communication abilities.

 

Approximately 75-90% of individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) have a speech disorder at some time in the course of their disease. The most common perceptual speech characteristics include reduced loudness, monopitch, hoarseness, a breathy voice quality and/or imprecise articulation. These changes in speech can make it difficult to be understood.

 

As you have experienced first hand, these speech changes can have a significantly negative impact on quality of life. Communication at work, with family or with friends can all be compromised. Speech intervention may include intensive speech exercises and exercising is good for people with PD.

 

Seeking an evaluation with a speech-language pathologist experienced with PD sooner rather than later is important so you can begin an effective treatment program and receive the benefits of better communication.

 

I wish you the best,

 

Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP

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I initially had difficulty with amplification. Now i have difficulty making any sound. Even whisperiing .

Also have trouble initiating voice. Seem to have trouble coordinating breathing and speaking. When i do get a word out

the next one wont come without taking another breath , if at all. What do you think i can do?

 

Dear Person with Parkinson Disease,

 

I am so sorry to hear how much your ability to communicate has changed. It is not possible for me to say what you should do without seeing you in person. In general, there are exercises that can help. Specifically, LSVT LOUD is an exercise based treatment that has been shown to help people with PD to improve speech characteristics and be easier to understand (Ramig et al., 2001, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry). Other treatment options are also available. You would need an evaluation with a speech-language pathologist who has experience treating people with PD. The evaluation will determine which treatment is right for you based on your individual communication abilities.

 

Approximately 75-90% of individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) have a speech disorder at some time in the course of their disease. The most common perceptual speech characteristics include reduced loudness, monopitch, hoarseness, a breathy voice quality and/or imprecise articulation. These changes in speech can make it difficult to be understood.

 

As you have experienced first hand, these speech changes can have a significantly negative impact on quality of life. Communication with family or with friends and caregivers can all be compromised. Speech intervention may include intensive speech exercises and exercising is good for people with PD.

 

Seeking an evaluation with a speech-language pathologist experienced with PD sooner rather than later is important so you can begin an effective treatment program and receive the benefits of better communication.

 

I wish you the best,

 

Leslie Mahler, PhD, CCC-SLP

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My mom's voice is getting progressively more difficult to hear and understand. She is very frustrated with this and has had speech therapy. She attends a day center and has great difficulty communicating with others, because with others talking in the room, her voice cannot be heard. Is there such a thing as a microphone or some other technology that can help others to hear her?

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Speaking softly for people with PD involves not only changes to the muscles of speech production but changes in the sensory perception of normal loudness. An amplification device may help your mother compensate for decreased loudness but it won't address the underlying cause. For that she will need behavioral treatment. The good news is that behavioral treatment can help. The NPF does not endorse any specific amplification devices. Below you will find resources to learn more about the options available to make your own choice.

 

Chattervox

http://www.chattervox.com/

 

Luminaud

Including:

Rand Amplifier

Voicette Amplifier

Megavox

http://www.luminaud.com/amplifier.htm

 

I encourage you to "shop around" , compare cost, and see what feels right for your father-in-law. Remember to consider cost and how long your father will benefit from amplification of his voice. Also, if his voice is extremely soft, the listeners may not benefit from a device that only provides 10 to 12 dB of amplification.

 

Sincerely,

Leslie Mahler

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