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kholden

Roundup, An Herbicide, Could Be Linked To Parkinson's, Cancer And Other Health Issues, Study Shows

7 posts in this topic

I think it is wise to be cautious in use of toxic chemicals, whether PD has been diagnosed or not. I believe we know less than we think about their supposed safety. -Kathrynne

 

 

 

 

 

Roundup, An Herbicide, Could Be Linked To Parkinson's, Cancer And Other Health Issues, Study Shows

 

 

Reuters | Posted: 04/25/2013 1:49 pm EDT | Updated: 04/26/2013 3:26 pm EDT

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 25 (Reuters) - Heavy use of the world's most popular herbicide, Roundup, could be linked to a range of health problems and diseases, including Parkinson's, infertility and cancers, according to a new study.

 

The peer-reviewed report, published last week in the scientific journal Entropy, said evidence indicates that residues of "glyphosate," the chief ingredient in Roundup weed killer, which is sprayed over millions of acres of crops, has been found in food.

 

Those residues enhance the damaging effects of other food-borne chemical residues and toxins in the environment to disrupt normal body functions and induce disease, according to the report, authored by Stephanie Seneff, a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Anthony Samsel, a retired science consultant from Arthur D. Little, Inc. Samsel is a former private environmental government contractor as well as a member of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

 

"Negative impact on the body is insidious and manifests slowly over time as inflammation damages cellular systems throughout the body," the study says.

 

We "have hit upon something very important that needs to be taken seriously and further investigated," Seneff said.

 

Environmentalists, consumer groups and plant scientists from several countries have warned that heavy use of glyphosate is causing problems for plants, people and animals.

 

The EPA is conducting a standard registration review of glyphosate and has set a deadline of 2015 for determining if glyphosate use should be limited. The study is among many comments submitted to the agency.

 

Monsanto is the developer of both Roundup herbicide and a suite of crops that are genetically altered to withstand being sprayed with the Roundup weed killer.

 

These biotech crops, including corn, soybeans, canola and sugarbeets, are planted on millions of acres in the United States annually. Farmers like them because they can spray Roundup weed killer directly on the crops to kill weeds in the fields without harming the crops.

 

Roundup is also popularly used on lawns, gardens and golf courses.

 

Monsanto and other leading industry experts have said for years that glyphosate is proven safe, and has a less damaging impact on the environment than other commonly used chemicals.

 

Jerry Steiner, Monsanto's executive vice president of sustainability, reiterated that in a recent interview when questioned about the study.

 

"We are very confident in the long track record that glyphosate has. It has been very, very extensively studied," he said.

 

Of the more than two dozen top herbicides on the market, glyphosate is the most popular. In 2007, as much as 185 million pounds of glyphosate was used by U.S. farmers, double the amount used six years ago, according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/25/roundup-herbicide-health-issues-disease_n_3156575.html

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I think so, too, Drummergirl. I consider it a warning to be very, very cautious with chemicals. After all, at one time, DDT was seen to be a miraculous insecticide that would control insect-borne diseases like malaria, and save our crops. Only gradually did we learn of its toxic effects on the environment, and its ability to remain stored in human tissues. Who knows whether someday many more of the chemicals we now use will be implicated in the rising incidence of such diseases as cancer, autism, allergies, diabetes, and so many others.

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I remember as a young child playing outside and we would watch the planes spraying the fields and trees. Sometimes I wonder if perhaps I/ we were closer to them then I/ we should have been!

 

Plus my family lived below a farm for several years. We had a very deep artisian well, 600'.

 

We now live beside a dairy pasture, also have a deep artisian well, 650' but we are not in it's run off. Plus, we are aware and cautious of the very possible causes of PD and who knows what else.

 

Im not sure how deep chemiclas can penetrate, probably relatively deep if it's level, and maybe not so deep if the land is sloped due to the runoff. ??

 

I doubt we will never know for sure.

Thanks for the info~

Karen

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I'm not sure, either, how deep the chemicals penetrate. I have heard that the rain washes pesticides into water runoff and from there into shallow springs and cisterns. I am very glad that you have a deep well and are outside the runoff.

 

Anecdotally, a friend of mine with young-onset PD recalls how her father kept a barrel of "white powder" in the barn when she was a child. She used to play "makeup" using it to powder her face. Later she learned it was DDT. How little we know about the products we take for granted in our daily lives.

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Oh my! To powder ones face with it. yikes.....

 

A big oncern of mine is all the plastics and vinlys, car interiors are loaded with chemically treated products, as mny other items we are exposed to.

 

All the GMO's in most of the foods we consume.....on & on....

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Yes, Drummergirl, I was just reading an article about the BPA, pthalates, and other toxins in garden hoses, and thinking about all the children who will be playing with them all summer long. DDT may be banned but we have new products, some of which may be as bad. I try to stay informed, but it's an uphill battle.

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