Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
Bryan Kleine

Military And PD

Recommended Posts

Hello,

My name is Bryan.

 

I was diagnosed with Parkinsons 4 years ago. Been a pain in the butt... I have a question and am looking for help or direction in the matter. I have no history of PD in my family and when I was diagnosed. I have researched causes and there are many. The only one I can think of is the toxic chemicals I used while in the Military. My Neuroligist at the VA believes that may be the case. I have been denied 3 times by the VA, because they say I can not prove it was service connected. All the chemicals have been baned fron the Navy over the years. Any one here going through the same problems?

 

Thanks

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the VA only treat PD if it is service related? Only about 5% of PD is traceable in the family tree. Most people never know why they develop it. I may be naive, but I thought any veteran could get services at a VA center for life.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryan:

 

I’ve got a disability rating from the V.A. for Parkinson’s based on what they call the “Presumptive Clause”. I served active Navy from 1979 through 1987, was out for about 10-years until I joined the Reserves in 1997 and finally retired in 2011.

 

I first filed my claim in 2007 after having been back from my second deployment as a Reservist (Kuwait for a year) when I started experiencing tremor that I could no longer ignore. At that point in time I was ignorant about the potential connections between my service and Parkinson’s and only filed the claim because my buddies urged me to; I had no expectations that it would be accepted and true to my expectations, it was denied based on no proof of service connection. Several months went by and I got a call from the Wisconsin Department of Veterans affairs (I think that’s what they are called); apparently they review all rejected V.A. claim applications (For Wis residents). They explained to me that they felt my claim was inappropriately denied and that the V.A should have granted the claim because the “Presumptive Clause” basically says that any degenerative brain condition that manifests symptoms within one year of discharge from active duty is presumed to be service connected. They asked my permission to appeal the rejection—of course I gave it—and about a year later, I was approved. Apparently, for certain conditions this clause removes a good portion of the otherwise required proof of service connection. I don’t know what caused my Parkinson’s but apparently the V.A. seems to think there is sufficient reason to assume a connection.

 

I found a site that does a pretty good job explaining the presumptive clauses:

www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11908&page=36

 

I also found someone’s blog page that describes his experiences with getting a rating from the V.A.: myparkinsonsadventure.blogspot.com

 

I don’t know what era you served in but during my active days we used degreasing solvents (Quite extensively without personal protective equipment and frequently without ventilation). The solvents were Percholorethylene (aks: dry cleaning solvent) and Trichloroethylene. In recent years, exposure to both of these chemicals have been associated with significant increase in incidences of Parkinson’s. Also recently the V.A. has approved the use of the presumptive clause—I believe without time limits—for exposure to agent-orange.

 

I suggest you contact the county Vets Rep. or a Veterans organization to help you decipher the clause and see if you can apply it to your situation

 

I hope what I’ve provided assists your pursuit of a rating.

 

Ken

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the VA only treat PD if it is service related? Only about 5% of PD is traceable in the family tree. Most people never know why they develop it. I may be naive, but I thought any veteran could get services at a VA center for life.

 

You are a bit naive, if you are a Veteran you MAY get benefits, based on an enormous list of conditions. and if you look up VA benefits you will find that Veteran's are classified in order of ,for lack of a better word, importance. Those with Service related injuries are at the top of that list with a number 1 classification, it goes down from there. My husband was in the Air Force during the Vietnam period, but not in a war zone, his eligiblity ranking is 8 and there are more after that. also to get accepted for help you have to jump through flaming hoops basically.

 

But they have recently changed some things about PD and the VA so the OP might have a better time now, again there are those Hoops!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken-thank you so much for your very clear and detailed explanation of "Presumptive Clause." I had never heard of that and thank goodness that Wisconsin Department of Veteran Affairs helped you out. My husband was in Vietnam (twice) and he is on VA disability-thanks to the VA Chief Shenseki who approved the study and payout of benefits. It's a huge benefit because otherwise all he had was social security and some money in a 401. We are very active in our local Parkinson's support group and your explanation is a valuable piece of information. For the all wartime veterans out there-there is another benefit called Aid and Attendance that provides caregiver funding. It's income based but after you subtract your caregiving expenses, you probably qualify. However, it's not a double benefit if you are already receiving VA disability-FYI.

Edited by carruthers209

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken,

Thank you for the information. I was in the Navy from 82-87. I was a Boatswains Mate. I used the same solvents. :Percholorethylene (aks: dry cleaning solvent) and Trichloroethylene" also Zinc Cromate and Red Lead. All now banned by the Navy. I have been working with the DAV here in Colorado. I also assist Veterans Get into the VA, paperwork etc. I do get my treatment through the VA. I am listed as a G8.

 

I am trying to get as much information to back my case as well as (hopefully) assisting others in my situation get some closure in theirs. I am not the only one with PD that served their country. Thanks for your info...

Bryan

Edited by Bryan Kleine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To those of you who have answered this post, please read the post I wrote today, June 3, on the Open Forum. I would have posted it here if I had known about your post. Same subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken I was reading your post because of my own personal intrest in this matter, but my step dad who has been putting claims with the V A for some time for his prostate cancer, same type of deal, and he has been approved, When asking him about my issues, he said just keep putting in the claims. The VA hopes you will just stop, but be pushy (he said) not rude, just keep going for it. Don't know how long it will take just don't give up. Bless your journey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and once approved on appeal of an initially denied claim, benefits should be paid retroactively to the date of said initial claim. Thus it behooves you to maintain an accurate record of health costs incurred during the course of the litigation.

Edited by Rogerstar1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am Treated at the VA, 0% disabled, no service connection that I can place on my PD, however I am catagory 5, because of my income and number of dependents I am also exempt for co-pays, both for treatment and medications. My father is also treated at the VA and his PD is considered service connected. My mother who also has PD advised me that what you need to have your doctor say is that your PD is more likeley than not a result of some exposure (be specific). Dad was around reactor so exposure to heavy metals was whet they looked at in his case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bryan, i was boots on the ground in vietnam and i am receiving compensation for pd due to agent orange. i suggest that you go to www.va.gov.com and search DBQ and find the one for pd and make an appointment with a civilian neurologists and have him fill out the DBQ and ask him to write a letter saying: more likely than not the name of the chemicals you came in contact with caused your pd. you only have one year to appeal your denied claim. get a veterants organization like the vfw or dav to help you. also,

 

google veterans benefits network-a lot of knowledge here, all veterans. where you on the ground or of the coast of a war zone? DON'T GIVE UP! do all the above quickly.

 

GOD BLESS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×