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kholden

Watch and learn: a new tool for measuring Parkinson’s disease

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Watch and learn: a new tool for measuring Parkinson’s disease

 

 

For every medical condition, treatments are most effective when measurement guides the choice of therapy and its effects. Just think of diabetes, where blood glucose levels guide the choice of treatment then measure its effectiveness. Until now there’s been no objective measure to guide therapy for…

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    Malcolm Horne
     
    Honorary (Professorial Fellow) at the Centre for Neuroscience at University of Melbourne

Disclosure Statement

 

Malcolm Horne consults with Global Kinetics Corporation (GKC) and owns shares in this company. He works for the Florey Institute for Neurosciences and Mental Health, which has also invested in GKC. This company has received funding from the Medical Research Council Fund, Comercialise Australia (Australian Federal Government) and the Small Technologies Industry Uptake Program (Victorian Government)

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Where experts find jobs v5sjmhpv-1373325234.jpg The Parkinson’s KinetiGraph provides a new way to objectively measure the movements of Parkinson’s sufferers. Malcolm Horne

For every medical condition, treatments are most effective when measurement guides the choice of therapy and its effects. Just think of diabetes, where blood glucose levels guide the choice of treatment then measure its effectiveness.

Until now there’s been no objective measure to guide therapy for Parkinson’s disease, which affects more than six million people globally. But my colleagues and I at the Florey Institute think we’ve found an effective and inexpensive way to do it: the Parkinson’s KinetiGraph (PKG) uses advanced technology to measure and assess Parkinson’s sufferers' treatment.

 

http://theconversation.com/watch-and-learn-a-new-tool-for-measuring-parkinsons-disease-14706

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"Our team at the Florey placed sensors on the limbs of Parkinson’s sufferers to measure acceleration as a means for measuring movement. They then developed two algorithms: one to produce a bradykinesia score and the other to produce a dyskinesia score. The accelerometer output was recorded continuously over the day and night and the algorithms use the data to produce a score every two minutes."

 

I think the challenge is in knowing what to do once you have a score.

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Yes, I agree, Beachdog. I'm certain nothing will ever replace an experienced Movement Disorders Specialist. This might be an awfully handy tool for them, though. :idea:

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