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Beau's Mom

The only stupid question is the one you don't ask.

6 posts in this topic

Dear Kathrynne,

 

I'm trying not to feel stupid asking this question, thus the title.

 

If I can't eat cow's milk and cow's cheese, would eating goat's milk or goat cheese also be a problem?

 

Thanks.

 

Dianne

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Dianne, that's a very intelligent question, so much so that researchers are scratching their heads over it. There are a couple of common concerns --  allergy and lactose intolerance.

 

Usually we grow out of cow's milk allergy by the teen years; but not necessarily. However, children usually cannot tolerate sheep or goats milk;  some children can tolerate mare's or donkey's milk.

 

Lactose intolerance, however, can be lifelong, and individual tolerance of different mammalian milks varies considerably. I do think I would seek help from an allergy specialist, rather than trying it on your own -- there are so many possible confounding factors.

 

If you detail the concerns with cow's milk, I will  see if I can provide further help, i.e. has the problem with cow's milk been lifelong; is it a diagnosed allergy; is it lactose intolerance; did it occur after diagnosis of PD, etc. Details will be very helpful.

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Thank you, Kathrynne. I was advised to stop drinking/eating dairy products as part of an IBS diet several years ago, before my PD diagnosis but not before PD symptoms. I've never been told I have a milk allergy, but have hated drinking milk since childhood. In elementary school milk was a nickel. I saved one nickel and every other day bought an ice cream bar for a dime. I didn't tell my mother for 30 years! Not eating foods that irritate IBS has caused considerable weight loss and helped my constipation to some degree.

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That is a great help, thanks. I would have most certainly picked ice cream bars over milk, had I only had the choice!

 

My first thought, perhaps wrong, is that you will probably need to rule out all dairy. Your lifelong aversion to milk speaks volumes, and most often all kinds of milk are offenders. You may be among the exceptions, though.

 

My second, more important, thought is to be certain that you've been correctly diagnosed. More and more information is becoming available about IBS. Of concern, it is often misdiagnosed. Frequently, people are diagnosed with IBS but they actually have Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), celiac disease, gluten intolerance or candida.

 

Most cases of IBS are triggered by cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivities. A colleague of mine specializes in this field, and I recommend you contact her:

 

Jan Patenaude, RD, CLT
Director of Medical Nutrition
Oxford Biomedical Technologies, Inc.
970-963-3695 (Mountain Time)
Fax: 215-895-9921
DineRight4@aol.com
 

She can direct you to a therapist who can determine the exact nature of your GI concerns, and precisely which foods to avoid; and whether you can safely drink goat's milk. The program has had many, many successes, including a relative of mine. I don't have nearly the breadth of knowledge and training in this field as Jan does; but certainly, if I can help further, let me know.

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Thank you, Kathrynne. As always, your advice is right on target. I've been meaning to ask my GI about SIBO. I'll have to begin a list for my next appointment. I will also write to Jan Patenaude if it turns out that my problem is indeed IBS. That diagnosis comes from the early 1980's, so may well be wrong!

 

Dianne

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You're very welcome; and please let us know the results when you've talked to your doctor.

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