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Roxannk

Parkinson's and violent behavior

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Roxannk    0

Just joined the forum because I am overwhelmed by my husband's recent behavior. He was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's about 10 years ago and is 52 years old now. We have had heated arguments in the past, but never violent. Two nights ago he got very angry and slapped me in the face. And, last night he again got very angry and screamed at me for about 20 minutes, very abusive, and punched holes in the door and in the walls. He has never done anything like this before, and it is not even like it has been coming on, it just came out of the blue. We have an 8 year old daughter, and I am afraid, because he is totally out of control when this happens. I asked him to call the neurologist to see about medication that might cause this, he told the doctor he had become more "agitated." They said it might be the azilect. But he has been on the current dosage for 6 months. Has anyone heard of anything like this? Any advice? I'm at a loss as to the next step. 

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DaveN    425

I took Azilect for a couple of months but didn't exhibit that side effect.  However, when I first started using the Neupro patch I was on edge the entire time I used it.  I would snap at my wife for no reason.  After a bit I was able to recognize what was happening and was able to suppress this behavior.

 

Dave

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PatriotM    797

The side effects listed for Azilect include mood/mental changes and agitation.  Could the Azilect (or some other drug) be causing this - YOU BET!

 

I used to take cyclobenzaprine for severe headaches.  My wife called them "nasty pills", because the drug made me very sensitive to sound.  It is very irritating to have someone talk to me and I frequently responded in a verbally unfriendly way.  I never hit anyone or anything like that, but I could certainly see how a drug could cause that to happen.

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JillianD    8

After my husband had been on Azilect for 6 months, it suddenly became impossible for me to have a rational discussions with him, and he became totally verbally abuse, particularly about matters importnat to me that he totally misinterpreted. 

About 8 months later the neurologist suddenly stopped the Azilect and put him onto low dose dopamine.   Azilect tries to ensure the body utilises excess dopamine by preventing the body from reabsorbing it, it does not add dopamine to the patient.  He was underdosed with dopamine for the next 2 years and remained impossible like an addict who is continually looking for a fix and an argument.  

3 years later he is now takes 2 drugs for his PD every 2.5hrs during the day and is much better - although I am still very hesitant to talk to him about matters that are important to me.   So, yes, my experience of Azilect was a major behaviour shift that left me stunned and shocked and unable to work out what to do for a long time.

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Roxannk    0

Thank you everyone, especially Jillian for your story. My husband's dr. has decreased his dosage of Azilect from 1 mg to 1/2 mg. We have talked things out a little and are trying to get past it. The problem is, as you mentioned, now I am afraid to bring things up, afraid to be alone with him, and would rather be at work. I'm sure that will change over time, but right now it is a horrible feeling. We are going to try counseling, as well.

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Trying hard    232

What about alexithamia?  It's where PWP cannot recognize their own emotions, and can't recognize others  either.  They have trouble experiencing empathy, and are unable to comprehend or respond to others emotions, and because of it their emotions become really intense, like panic attacks, extreme anxiety and violent outbursts, or they just don't react at all even when they should.  My DH has had all of those except the violent behavior, though I am waiting for that day.  The DBS really helped with the motor problems, but I've been living with all these non-motor symptoms for years.  I have to constantly remind myself that he no longer can be reasonable, rational, or logical, and his memory is so bad now that he doesn't remember anything much of what he does.  I don't know if this is your case or not but I do understand what you are going through, might be something to bring up with neuro,  Just a thought, good luck.

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coacht    95

Thanks for posting about alexithamia. It is more of no empathy for us, but lots for others. It makes things difficult for sure.

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Trying hard    232

So for you what matters?  If you have no empathy, how do you deal with it?  For me I'm trying really hard to understand if there is anything that takes the place of empathy.  Why do you think some have lots of empathy and others none?  I think I already know the answer, no one knows :)

Thanks for sharing Coacht.

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coacht    95

I just keep going. I know that if I accomplish something it will be no big deal for her. An example, I received a patent and when I told her she said good and walked away. A big let down. My son and I won a national championship with a bull of ours. She told

me she was glad I had a good time and that was it. It was a big deal. She has no empathy for how we have to deal with her messes

and takes us for granted when we clean up after her. That is the type of thing I mean about empathy. Also when I talked to her about it she broke down and cried, not for what she did to us, but that she wasn't doing things right. It was about her, not us. She didn't really care about our feelings.

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Trying hard    232

Congrats to you for your patent and to your son for national championship, must have been magical for you both.  Having a small ranch and been involved in all kinds of ranching I know it's not easy winning a championship without a lot of hard work.

I don't think it's that she doesn't care, the brain doesn't let her  process.  For me it's not tears.    I get blamed for ............. well everything.  Someday I'll design a T-Shirt, something cute, and it'll be my suit of armor.:)   I've decided that for me it's the non-motor that is far worse that the motor - PWP loose both, that's what makes it sooooooooooooooo difficult.

Again congrats to both of you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :)

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coacht    95

Roger,

It was for a fluid applicator for applying herbicides or liquid fertilizer. No big company was interested though. I haven't had the time or energy to get much else done so far. I am going to start working on it again here soon. I agree that the non motor is

far more disruptive for our family. Especially when a couple of kids like things just so and get into a lot of arguments with her. Also since there is confusion, especially with the artane, then her judgment of what is happening to her is even impaired.Anxiety doesn't help at all either. the house and meals are a disaster, especially when pride steps in and that is not related to PD.

Thanks for asking Roger.

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afroney    124

So for you what matters? If you have no empathy, how do you deal with it? For me I'm trying really hard to understand if there is anything that takes the place of empathy. Why do you think some have lots of empathy and others none? I think I already know the answer, no one knows :)

Thanks for sharing Coacht.

I actually find the Parkinson's Apathy/lack of empathy to be pleasant. It's nice floating through life without a care in the world.

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johnnys    460

 Ive had PD now for 5 yerars and wouldnt want ever to go off medsActualy right now I have almost zero apathy and more empathy then i ever thought possible.I think the answer is I avoid temper(fear and anger)and the sun shines through..

More people should concentrate on getting  their tempers(fear and anger) controled if they want to be at peace and be able to feel for others,

The world would be a paradise if temper  was made anti-social.

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Kim Rich    1

Just joined the forum because I am overwhelmed by my husband's recent behavior. He was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's about 10 years ago and is 52 years old now. We have had heated arguments in the past, but never violent. Two nights ago he got very angry and slapped me in the face. And, last night he again got very angry and screamed at me for about 20 minutes, very abusive, and punched holes in the door and in the walls. He has never done anything like this before, and it is not even like it has been coming on, it just came out of the blue. We have an 8 year old daughter, and I am afraid, because he is totally out of control when this happens. I asked him to call the neurologist to see about medication that might cause this, he told the doctor he had become more "agitated." They said it might be the azilect. But he has been on the current dosage for 6 months. Has anyone heard of anything like this? Any advice? I'm at a loss as to the next step.

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Kim Rich    1

Wow...sadly this sounds like my life. Husband was diagnosed at 51 with parkinsons. A year ago he pushed me into a wall. I fell and bruised the back of my legs. This outburst seemed completely out of the blue. I couldn't make him angry 10 years ago. Such a calm, gentle man. We have a 10 year old daughter which makes his illness extra sad. He was on concerta to wake him up, he also has a massive sleep disorder which kept him from functioning at all. Neuro psych told me to call the copps. We reduced dose and he has been fine ever since. No more anger...still gets agitated and stressed easily, but not violent. I was shopping for a condo a year ago. Sadly doctors don't take side effects of all these meds too seriously. I don't really know if his violence was due to drugs or disease and I live in fear that the monster will return. With a young child I can't tolerate a repeat performance. No compeyent medical support makes everything extra hard. Thinking LBD as well which complicates med mix options considerably. Write a letter to his neuro and keep a journal of all his behavior with dates and meds. Wish I had better advice.

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Kim Rich    1

Apathy and a lack of empathy is a relationship destroyer. This is what makes us human. To care is to love. Parkinsons destroys the ability to love. The opposite of love isn't hate it's indifference.

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Kim Rich    1

Ive had PD now for 5 yerars and wouldnt want ever to go off medsActualy right now I have almost zero apathy and more empathy then i ever thought possible.I think the answer is I avoid temper(fear and anger)and the sun shines through..

More people should concentrate on getting their tempers(fear and anger) controled if they want to be at peace and be able to feel for others,

The world would be a paradise if temper was made anti-social.

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Linda Garren    733

Thank you everyone, especially Jillian for your story. My husband's dr. has decreased his dosage of Azilect from 1 mg to 1/2 mg. We have talked things out a little and are trying to get past it. The problem is, as you mentioned, now I am afraid to bring things up, afraid to be alone with him, and would rather be at work. I'm sure that will change over time, but right now it is a horrible feeling. We are going to try counseling, as well.

 

Roxann, have you gone with your husband when he's seen his doctor?  If not, you might consider setting up an appt. for the three of you to discuss this. 

Edited by Linda Garren

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Linda Garren    733

Apathy and a lack of empathy is a relationship destroyer.  It surely is.  This is what makes us human. To care is to love. Parkinsons destroys the ability to love. The opposite of love isn't hate it's indifference. So sad; so true.

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Quietstill    450

Welcome.

Sounds like you have not had a very good time in the last year.  That sounds really scary.  I hope the current meds are such that last year's behavior hasn't returned?  You and your daughter need to be safe first of all.  Everything else can follow from that.  You mention a sleep disorder, can you give a little detail?  I am asking because that can increase your unease.  I still don't sleep soundly at night after waking up the second time to being punched about the head  (REM Behavior Disorder), although we have not had a repeat of that in over 2 years.  So I can understand how sleep issues sure can contribute. 

 

Glad you found us. 

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