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miracleseeker

Best way to lift someone off the floor when you are alone

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genden69    178

My husband's mobility issues are a puzzle. Usually he has a hard time just walking to the bathroom or the few steps from his chair to his bed with assistance. I know you wish your mother could do that, but it is my worst time. He has no judgment and does dangerous things. It doesn't happen often, but when he gets a spurt of energy, if I am not right there, he will bolt up our staircase--a winding, steep, long staircase. Often when he gets to the top, he becomes immobile and I have a very difficult time getting him back down the stairs.I can't leave him alone ever. I have a lady (paid) who comes once a week for two hours while I shop and run errands. My daughter comes on Saturday afternoons so I can get some things done. Without some help, I wouldn't be able to care for him.

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miracleseeker    675

I get what you mean.  I wish my mom had the strength to get up and go but also have the common sense to know what she is doing at the same time.

It was only a couple of years ago that I would put her to bed and have her rest while I left to do errands.  When I leave she would get up and turn on all the faucets in the house and let the water running then she would explore each room and move things around.  One thing she never did was get out of the house by herself because she's too chicken to do that.  Now she can't even get out of bed on her own so I don't have to worry about leaving her for quick errands.  I guess that's what you call a blessing in disguise.

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elle    104

genden, I had a lot of the same problems you did last year when my husband could still walk.  You could use a chair alarm (I don't; it would drive me crazy) but what I have discovered is to lay him back in his lift chair and UNPLUG HIM!!  Yes I said it.  It is the only thing that has saved my sanity.  But don't forget to unplug cause they always figure it out!

 

I think you have to keep control!  He was always getting out of bed in the middle of the night too but now I have a hospital bed and the rails are just enough to rein him in.  Good luck!  He is lucky to have you!

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genden69    178

It is true that we do what we do out of love. However, other reasons may be just as compelling. My husband and I have been married for 55 years. He has always been kind and easy to live with. However, the dementia has changed him in many ways, so that he has become difficult to live with, verbally as well as sometimes physically abusive, uncooperative, insensitive, etc. as well as hard to manage physically. I know that none of this is his fault and if he were aware of his behaviors and the care he has created for me, he would be mortified. I try to remember how he used to be, but in the day to day trenches, it is often hard for me. I care for him out of love, but I also care for him out of necessity. The cost of memory care is almost prohibitive for me. My mother is 101 years old, lives alone in her own home and is in relatively good health, mentally sharp as a tack. I can't deplete my resources so that I don't have resources to sustain me into an old age. Also, I believe he gets better care at home. If I had unlimited resources, I would buy another home with space to hire live in help 24/7. My social life is nonexistent. I can't leave him alone. It is even hard for me to take a bath or shower. I must find someone to sit with him while I shop, go to the doctor, etc. Heaven forbid that I get sick. I am doing damage to my knees and hips lifting him and worry that I will need surgery in the near future. Sometimes I wonder if the wear and tear of his care, along with the social isolation, will take me before he goes. It is a difficult situation with no easy answers. I know I am not alone. Many others are dealing with caring for a loved one with Parkinson's/dementia, Alzheimer's, stroke, etc. Help us all.

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miracleseeker    675

I'm with you.  Nothing is about us anymore.  Our needs are put on the back burner but one day at a time.  Right now they are the ones in need so I just do what needs to be done and worry later.  I'm pretty sure I'll end up in a nursing home without having the option of being home as a better way to live.  Your husband and my mom are lucky they have us.  That's just  how we ended up I suppose.   You are definitely not alone.  There will always be caregivers that do way more than us and then some that do less but we are all in the same boat.  My health is not great either but I push on.   I wouldn't be able to live with myself if my mom didn't get the best care in my eyes when I'm still moving around and kicking.  Just like you there is no place like home for my dear mom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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afroney    125

Dad and I both have moderate to severe Parkinsons and find our selves stuck to the floor/chair.

 

Both of us still have a considerable amount of strength. So one pulls the other up by the arm. Usually the assist is enough to get one of us un stuck.

 

I wouldnt want your mom injured, though. Would taking her hand and gently pulling be enough of a cue to help her off the floor. Parkinsons seems to be alot about cues.

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miracleseeker    675

It really depends when I get her off the floor.  If she had just fallen then she still has some bounce to her to allow me to help her up but if it's been 5 minutes or more then it gets harder.  It's like her butt is glued on there by then.  Due to her dementia she can't follow instructions so even if I slide her to the edge of the bed or the sofa and ask her to push down to raise her herself she won't do it.   She is actually perfectly happy to stay on the floor and even laying down and start humming to herself.  She's never injured because she slides down and not trip and fall.

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afroney    125

It really depends when I get her off the floor. If she had just fallen then she still has some bounce to her to allow me to help her up but if it's been 5 minutes or more then it gets harder. It's like her butt is glued on there by then. Due to her dementia she can't follow instructions so even if I slide her to the edge of the bed or the sofa and ask her to push down to raise her herself she won't do it. She is actually perfectly happy to stay on the floor and even laying down and start humming to herself. She's never injured because she slides down and not trip and fall.

Honestly, I like laying on the floor. Do it all the time. Easier to turn over and get up from than something soft like a bed. Cant fall out of the floor during sleep like you can a bed. I spend hours sometimes on the floor. Dad sleeps on it.

 

If she seems happy there and isnt in any danger, Id leave her there for awhile (as bad as that sounds). Give her a pillow and blanket.

 

I wonder if there is a medical assist device to pick someone up. The mechanical guy in me pictures sliding a thin plastic sled under her back and tilting her up.

Edited by afroney

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miracleseeker    675

Is there a magic pill I can take that can give me hercules strength when I need that surge of energy?  I feel so useless each time it happens.  Why does it seem to happen to those of us that have to do the CG work alone?  Isn't life hard enough to not have to deal with this too? 

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Quietstill    450

Yeah, I occasionaly say 'life sucks, and then you die,' to myself.  But then I think of the good things...

 

I'm sorry you are (were) in a blue spot.  If you find that pill, let me know.  I cleaned the gutters yesterday (and changed the kitty litter); neither are 'my job'.  But when DH wakes from his nap, we're going to the grocery store, so life goes on.

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miracleseeker    675

I don't mind doing anything and everything for my mom as I do see it as my job.  It's when it's beyond my capability that I panic.   I snapped out of the "why me"  a long time ago.  All I want is allow me to do the work and life goes on.    Now where is that darn pill....

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Pathfinder    65

I never think of the "why me" either, l am grateful that I can take care of my husband. He is off the walker now so he doesn't require any help except an assist when waking from a nap to take Meds. Right now everything relating to keeping the house going falls to me. All appointments, medications, etc. as well, he no longer drives. His dementia is steady now, he has no short term memory but can be left alone for brief times. We still go out socially but with reluctance on his part. I have adjusted and feel thankful that it isn't worse, as each new symptom appears my main frustration is which part of his health woes is this attributed to? This site has been a blessing.

 

May you all have good things today.

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miracleseeker    675

It's very interesting how people see a situation.  Earlier today my mom lost her balance while I was getting her up from her recliner and she wouldn't pick up her feet so she just slide to the floor as I got behind her to walk her to the bathroom.  I could not pick her up so I went to my neighbor who lives across the hall from me.  She was at my next door neighbor's house chit chatting at the time so they both came over.  Neighbor across is a young mom who used to be a nurse and is now a full time homemaker.   Neighbor next door is a woman in her 60's who spent 5 months taking care of her sick mother who eventually passed away earlier this year while under her care.  The young woman seemed annoyed that I need her help and even told me I need to get 24 hour care.  I told her I do not have the money to get someone around the clock so I only have someone in the daytime while I work.   The other neighbor really stepped up and got my mom off the floor without hesitation and asked me where I wanted to take her. 

 

I took over and asked them to wait in the bedroom while I took mom to the bathroom myself.  I just wanted them there in case I couldn't handle it but for sure I wanted to do it myself.   When I came out 10 minutes later I thanked them to death for helping me.   The young mom smiled and couldn't get out of my house fast enough while the other lady reminded me that she is just next door and can come over anytime in the night if I need help again.   Her parting words were "We are neighbors" 

 

In times of crisis it is so good to know that nice people really do exist and just want to help knowing what I was going through and giving some support when I needed it most.  I'm lucky to live next door to her.   The secret to lifting someone off the floor is to not do it alone unless you are strong as an ox which I'm not.

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Moops    1

Hello Miracleseeker

came across this post when I was trying to resolve a similar issue with my Dad. I since came across this device, don't know if it maybe useful for you?

https://www.yorkshirecareequipment.com/p/moving-handling/raizer-emergency-lifting-chair/

I haven't gone for it myself so couldn't tell you anything about its costs - I thought it looked like an amazing invention but I'd already gone for the conventional wheelchair, which I try to keep handy in case it looks like my Dad's about 'to fold' from his standing position. There is a certain predictability to when my Dad loses strength in his legs, I think so anyway (It tends to be after I've taken him out so I get the wheelchair ready for when I'm escorting him back into the house.) so I get a bit of warning beforehand to try and prevent a fall. I find my Dad's got minimal energy levels so even sitting in a car for a while can be like exertion for him - I bring electrolyte & carbohydrate solutions with me to give him now (Like the powder mixes that athletes and people training for marathons take!)...probably 500ml a day in hot weather, say, as part of his normal hydration and I've found that makes a big difference in reducing the occurrence of loss of leg strength.

I realise I'm late with this reply compared to when you started the conversation but I didn't not want to send any information that I found could be helpful. Hope the situation has improved for you, apologies if I'm going over ground you already know...or if I've added 1 + 1 together to come up with 5! I did a speed read of this thread and it's 3am over here so my concentration is somewhat compromised as I'm writing this; I may have just made some suggestions that were not appropriate to your case!

Good luck with everything.

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miracleseeker    675

Hi Moops!   I would kiss you if I can reach you right now.  :lol:  This is genius!!!    I always wanted something like this but couldn't find it.  The closest thing I could think of was an inflatable bed that you can put under the person and have it pump that person to at least a sitting position but they could fall due to balance problems.  I really need to look this up but are you in the UK where this video seems originate?  I'll  have to check out the cost and if it can ship to the U.S.  where I am.   Welcome to the forum and thank you so much for bringing this to my attention.  I'm sure others here will find this a life saver too.       Oh.. and this tip about electrolyte sounds sensible enough but I always give my mom Gatorade and it doesn't really give her any energy.  Darn!  I would love more from you though.  Don't be shy and every advice is welcomed. 

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Moops    1

Hi! Yes, I'd had to dismiss the inflatable bed as well! I am in the UK but I've found another link for the Raizer, which might be better for you? It's the website of the actual manufacturer of the product, I think (The previous link I sent was for a UK supplier.) and it looks like they have some US suppliers. I hope its cost doesn't end up being prohibitive - estimates for healthcare services and products in the US always sound eye-watering to me!

https://www.raizer.com/

When I was looking into electrolyte supplements, I had heard that Gatorade and other 'supermarket' sports drinks don't offer 'serious' electrolyte replenishment - my brother sent me a load of products from one of those sports shops that gym bods go to for their muscle-building protein tubs, say (my brother does distance running). I make up a solution from a powder sachet by a UK brand called Science in Sport...I don't know what the US equivalent would be.

All the best, humbly submitted.

Moops

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On 4/7/2015 at 9:11 AM, genden69 said:

It is true that we do what we do out of love. However, other reasons may be just as compelling. My husband and I have been married for 55 years. He has always been kind and easy to live with. However, the dementia has changed him in many ways, so that he has become difficult to live with, verbally as well as sometimes physically abusive, uncooperative, insensitive, etc. as well as hard to manage physically. I know that none of this is his fault and if he were aware of his behaviors and the care he has created for me, he would be mortified. I try to remember how he used to be, but in the day to day trenches, it is often hard for me. I care for him out of love, but I also care for him out of necessity. The cost of memory care is almost prohibitive for me. My mother is 101 years old, lives alone in her own home and is in relatively good health, mentally sharp as a tack. I can't deplete my resources so that I don't have resources to sustain me into an old age. Also, I believe he gets better care at home. If I had unlimited resources, I would buy another home with space to hire live in help 24/7. My social life is nonexistent. I can't leave him alone. It is even hard for me to take a bath or shower. I must find someone to sit with him while I shop, go to the doctor, etc. Heaven forbid that I get sick. I am doing damage to my knees and hips lifting him and worry that I will need surgery in the near future. Sometimes I wonder if the wear and tear of his care, along with the social isolation, will take me before he goes. It is a difficult situation with no easy answers. I know I am not alone. Many others are dealing with caring for a loved one with Parkinson's/dementia, Alzheimer's, stroke, etc. Help us all.

Yes, genden69, you are not alone.  I am undergoing some of the same issues as you with my DH. It is getting very difficult to manage him due to his increasing weakness and dementia.  I had him in a care facility for 8 days, and he seemed to get along okay.  I know he'd rather be at home, but I feel like in the near future I will have to make a decision to put him in a memory care facility full time.  Do you have an adult day health care program in your community?  My DH is going to be starting the program in September.  He can go 2-3 times a week for 4 hours, and they provide OT, PT, activities, a meal, and even transportation.  You might want to check into that, especially if your DH is a veteran, as they may pay for it. 

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miracleseeker    675

My mom was in a daycare for 8 years and it was not a good experience.  Anytime I complained or questioned something that was done they would see me as a trouble maker.  I felt helpless because I couldn't afford to hire someone to watch my mom full time back then.  I would take her there and a helper would pick her up and stay with her until I got home from work.  3 years ago they kicked her out.   They said my mom was not benefiting from being there so they felt it would be in her best interest to leave them even if it means she would end up in a home.  Sorry to disappoint them but she's still in MY home.    I saw one of the workers yell at my mom when she wouldn't eat when that woman fed her.  She didn't know I was behind them.  As I got closer and she saw me she then changed her tone and became very loving.   I was sick to my stomach.     I hope you will have better luck with your place.  

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