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lethe    199

  I started Tai chi classes again. My instructor in the special classes has had Parkinson's for over 20 years! She has to be over 70 years old.

 

 

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Beau's Mom    1,053

Hi Lethe,

 

I do the sitting Tai Chi Qigong exercises on the DVD you can purchase on this site. I find the smooth, fluid movement soothing, and I still get a workout! I hope you enjoy it and that it helps you.

 

It's been crazy here in Washington State since they opened the first recreational marijuana stores earlier this month. Apparently there is not enough supply to meet demand, so the price is expected to skyrocket, even in the medical marijuana dispensaries. Those have a green cross, are numerous in this part of Seattle, and have names like Surreal Pain Relief.

 

Dianne

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Golden01    330

What an inspiration to hear about your Tai Chi instructor. My husband goes to a Tai Chi class for people with PD once a week. The local parkinson's groups support the program so he pays just $5 a class or $30 a month for as many classes as he can go to (he also goes once a week to a PWR! Moves class). As they say, exercise is medicine! 

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Hi Lethe,

 

I do the sitting Tai Chi Qigong exercises on the DVD you can purchase on this site. I find the smooth, fluid movement soothing, and I still get a workout! I hope you enjoy it and that it helps you.

I LOVED Chi Qigong... I used to do it by DVD, but my player died on me and I never took the trouble to find a CD version.  Tell me more about this, oh Guru of all things YOPD Forum!  I WANT to purchase the DVD (I hope it does come on CD or as a download or something?) because, in 31 years of marriage, that was the only form of "exercise" I could get my husband to do with me (we don't count bike riding because that is more fun than work!) and he actually enjoyed it!  A sitting version would be right up my street, balance-wise.

 

Also, if this is not too far off topic... does anyone ride a recumbent bike (not stationary) and, if so, how do you do with hills?  (My subdivision is called, Rolling Hills, so that should give you a clue why I ask!)  I don't have a lot of leg strength, so if it's as hard as an upright bike, I may not try it.  (I have a stationary recumbent and do great with that--in my imagination, I have cycled over many a hill and dale!)  I'm so awkward walking that I prefer getting my exercise by bike, but in my neighborhood, I just don't have the strength to peddle up all the hills.  Does anyone have experience with hills and a recumbent--are they easier than an upright, the same, or harder?

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grspangler    3

Hi Kim,

     I have been riding recumbents for twenty years and dealing with parkinson's for five.  Maybe, I can answer some of your questions.  

 

Recumbents come in different types and the answers to questions depend upon which type you are asking about.  If you are referring to two wheel recumbents, the answer about hills is they are harder to ride than an upright bike.  There are several reasons for this: you can't stand up and peddle on a recumbent, recumbents are slower on hills and as a result harder to balance,  recumbents are heavier than an equivalent upright bicycle.

 

Recumbents are also available as trikes and come in two configurations, delta and tadpole.  The delta uses a front single wheel for steering like a kid's tricycle.  They are commonly called adult trikes.  The tadpole trikes have two wheels up front for steering.  Tadpoles are lower to the ground and are used more for longer distances and a faster pace riding.

 

The good thing about trikes is you don't have to worry about balance!  You can go as slow as you want.  Your hill climbing then becomes a function of leg strength and gearing.

                                                                             I hope this helps - George

Edited by recumbent rider
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graflexmaster    1,182

Kim, you'd look great on a tadpole.......... complete with a low center of gravity BTW, My grandma rode an adult trike..... yup even had 3 speeds, and a basket in back for groceries....... lol...............  yup, I'm teasing you.........

Edited by graflexmaster
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lethe    199

Lethe, which one was you?

 

Dianne

 

  Not this time, sorry. Perhaps when I'm more, uh, fluid. I'll take a little video. :-P

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Kim, you'd look great on a tadpole.......... complete with a low center of gravity BTW, My grandma rode an adult trike..... yup even had 3 speeds, and a basket in back for groceries....... lol...............  yup, I'm teasing you.........

I'm laughing because I already have an adult trike!  The upright kind.  I LOVE it!  What I'm actually considering is a tandem trike, in hopes of persuading my husband to ride these hills with me... bad idea?  Or, is it actually possible to share the load and enjoy the ride??!

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Doug    63

I have been looking over the recumbent trikes for 6 months or so. My main transportation around our small town has been a bicycle for years and we have plenty of hills, you are either going up the hill or down there's not alot of flat road.  I stopped at a stop sign and went to put my foot down and it didn't make it down so I ended up flat on my back with my bicycle on top me looking a turtle turned of course turtle. I think that might be why my hip is raising hell with me now.  The recumbents are not cheap and there alot of choices to make between the various brands, it's pretty well like buying a car.  

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lethe    199

I've always rode a bike everywhere but unfortunately can no longer. I ride fine, but when I stop and put my feet or foot on the ground I sometimes lose balance and fall..

 

:|

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graflexmaster    1,182

I love my bike, especially my 2AM rides. At 2AM I have empty streets and no traffic worries. I try to avoid the hills here, as they are quite reminiscent of those in San Francisco (10-12% grades)

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MusicMan    769

Do you wear a helmet? I've never worn a helmet while riding a bike in my life, but I guess with PD it's probably the smart thing to do. I don't care if I get hit by a bus and die, but I don't want to fall and hit my head and cause a brain injury on TOP of PD....

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graflexmaster    1,182

No, I've never worn a helmet, and when I was young, I did a lot of road work (like Seattle to San Francisco). Now, the problem with wearing a helmet is I sweat, and it doesn't take a lot of exertion to start. By sweat, I mean I sweat A LOT. Mainly from my head, neck, and upper body. To the point that I've soaked shirts, and towels. Yes, I have the dermatitis issues associated with PD (on my head, hands, and feet) that come from sweating, and I believe that a helmet would only make that problem (on my head) worse.

Edited by graflexmaster

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lethe    199

I love my bike, especially my 2AM rides. At 2AM I have empty streets and no traffic worries. I try to avoid the hills here, as they are quite reminiscent of those in San Francisco (10-12% grades)

 

 

Me too... when I drove cab I use to ride home across town at 5am...

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lethe    199

Do you wear a helmet? I've never worn a helmet while riding a bike in my life, but I guess with PD it's probably the smart thing to do. I don't care if I get hit by a bus and die, but I don't want to fall and hit my head and cause a brain injury on TOP of PD....

 

No, I've never worn a helmet... Can you tell?  :|

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