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Tracking Parkinson’s with Advanced Technologies

 

The Michael J. Fox Foundation is partnering with Intel to develop big data
approaches for capturing patients' daily experience of living with Parkinson’s disease.

 

Patients are the greatest experts on their disease. By learning more directly from them about measurable aspects of PD, such as slowness of movement, tremor and gait disturbances, we hope to improve research and treatment of the disease.

 

We are assessing the use of wearable devices, such as smartphones and watches, to track PD 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Intel is developing big data techniques to detect patterns captured by the devices. Those insights could help improve the use of current Parkinson's treatments, assess potential new treatments, and point to new research directions for therapeutic development.

 

What are big data techniques?

We think of them as mathematical formulas. By applying these formulas to huge quantities of data — the wearable devices we're testing can transmit up to 300 data points per second per patient — researchers can extract new insights or make predictions.

 

What does this mean for people living with Parkinson’s?

For an individual patient, data analysis can give you a better picture of your daily life with PD to share with your doctor, and you can contribute to clinical research by sharing your de-identified data.

The technology remains experimental with a small number of volunteers, but eventually we hope wearable devices could become a common aspect of living with PD.

 

How can people with Parkinson's get involved?

The next phase of our data gathering study will start recruiting in New York, Boston and Tel Aviv this fall. Register with www.foxtrialfinder.org to be alerted of this and other studies in your area.

 

Want to learn more? Join our Webinar on Thursday, August 21, at 12 p.m. ET to hear from our experts and ask questions.

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One issue I see, is that it makes the same faulty assumption, that "everyone", including PWP's have and/or carry "smart" devices. The reality is just the opposite.

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One issue I see, is that it makes the same faulty assumption, that "everyone", including PWP's have and/or carry "smart" devices. The reality is just the opposite.

 

 True, I don't use my phone in public cause  it's too much aggravation and only bring it with me for music. I think one possibility is a device that you wear all day that regularly records all your vital signs, tremor etc  It would be automatic and not interactive.

 

I have an app that measures tremors that I never use, as well as a pill reminder that isn't really convenient.

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The only thing I use my "dumb" phone for other than as a phone, is the alarms to remind me to take pills......... A secondary devise that would be passive and/or automatic would be cool...... as long as it's supplied by those doing the study.........,,.

Edited by graflexmaster

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The best technology is very passive.

 

Think of a USB MEDICAL bracelet.  You just wear it, ideally super low power, and charge it once a week. 

 

Vibration and LED to remind you to talk pills.   Green for "ok to eat", yellow to let you know "avoid protein during this time", blink red until you take your pill.

 

Totally passive collecting data on how you walk, move, sleep. Since it know when you take medication, and your movements, it can help track on/off.  Good days/bad days.   My spouse is much more aware of my well being, but I try to track it.  Even my son commented the other night, when I was exercising, he hadn't seen me move so easily in ages.    (Step back, take a bow, with rapid arm movements.... typically I fall over when I attempt that, yet I was fine... irony was my 11:00am sinemet I took at 1:00pm,  then regular dose at 5:00.... this was around 6:00pm... implied is with more ldopa in my system I was doing better!)

 

Once you get near a computer, it will upload data to a cloud server.  Data crunched, and left on the server.  I go back and retrieve data.   Since I upload to cloud, someone else crunches data and leaves a "medication effective for 6.2  hours. Range from 5 to 7.5 best with 30 minutes exercise".  

 

Idea being with 50,000 PD patients demographics and data.   Gives a huge picture into what is effective, how effective, and also what might work best for you.  

Edited by TexasTom

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Hey Tom, Get to work on that for us will you......... I'll be the first in line to get one. Just think, you could become famous within the Parkie community......

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Most of what I am already describing exist in various forms, but I want some very simple.

 

My biggest issue is just battery size.  9 axis sensor, microcontroller, power control, and a  bluetooth wireless to send data to a device (phone, tablet, computer).

 

So it comes down to what features should be on it. Everything is on your smart phone, but this would be wearable.  Ideal is an adhesive patch you just apply, collect data for a week, then toss.  Six times a year, pretty passive, yet wealth of data on overall trends. 

 

There is some pretty fascinating stuff in the works:

 

http://www.parkinson.org/About-Us/Press-Room/NPF-In-The-News/2014/July/When-Wearable-Tech-Saves-Your-Life-You-Wont-Take

 

Other devices are specific and work with your iPhone, such as AliveCor's heart monitor

http://www.alivecor.com/home

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Gaphene....... I love it, and I want it....... The possibilities are endless....... I can already see applications in solar panels....... Think about it, car windows as solar chargers....... and beyond.

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