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Tom77

Physical therapy and exercises

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My father believes that there is no way physical therapy at home, and doing the exercises on his own will help give him more strength.

 

The home health company apparently believes that it worthwhile.

 

He said he is going to tell the physical therapist not to come anymore.

 

Anyone have any ideas on how to convice him to continue with it and at least try the exercises?

 

Would you think it would be illegal for a rehabilitation hospital to say that their patients improved in two weeks if they really did not?

 

Thank you very much.

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Would you think it would be illegal for a rehabilitation hospital to say that their patients improved in two weeks if they really did not?

 

 

It is not illegal.

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Why would it be allowed? That would mean everyone that goes through their exercises, over the time they are there whether they stay the same, worsen or improve may very well be getting a report saying that they made improvements.

 

It is uncertain if he was taking it erratically between September 3 to September 18. The order from the doctor was to take it once a day starting on August 29. The facility was told that it was being taken twice a day, then the doctor office called back to say that he should take it once a day with explaining what was happening.

 

Then, yesterday the doctor said that the Amandatine isn't the cause of what is happening.

 

The few times I was able to see my father, he had strength to push himself off of a wheelchair, which was during his last full day there. He was worse the day before he went on September 3 and just as bad between returning home on September 18 to today. He was taking Amantadine twice a day from July 23 to August 29.

 

However, he seems to at time have a little more strength at times since stopping the Amantadine a half week to week ago.

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…. I'm not sure if this relates to your father's situation or not? but sometimes therapists have to document improvements, although not always accurately, because they have a lot of pressure from insurance rules, which does not necessarily reflect the reality of what is occurring. Insurance may or may not pay for the service depending upon the rules and the situation. I am not updated on the most recent rules, so I am not clear on what current situations are. However, I did see this years ago when I worked in the rehab environment, and witnessed inaccurate documentation of what was really happening with the "client" because the insurance would stop if there was no "improvement" documented. It just may be something to ask about… if there is a social worker on the rehab "team" in the facility where the physical therapist works, you could ask them about these rules, as they  are usually the ones most up to date with these details. 

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So the end result is misleading all those involved. Not a very smart way to get a true understanding of what is going on.

Edited by Tom77

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Medicare has recently changed so the "improvement" is no longer required to continue PT for people with PD.

 

As far as exercise and PD, for my husband and sister, in my opinion, it has been "life-changing".

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It would be good to know if the two weeks of exercises really improved, even though it wasn't the case upon release and now the hopeful exercises given by the physical therapist at home.

Edited by Tom77

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My brother is 76 and has PD for about 9 years.  He has resisted doing any therapy.  Two years ago I moved in with him,  Since that time, I've pushed him to do his therapy.  This also included taking him to a near by club and getting him into water therapy (which he hated)  During all this time he refused to admit anything thing was helping.  This in spite of neighbors, his doctor, and therapist saying they saw improvement.  My point being, for him (my brother),  thinks that because he is doing therapy is going to heal him.  Even though I explain over and over that it won't heal him, but it will stop the PD from advancing as fast.

 

I know that without my taking time to sit right there, he will not do his exercise.  Right know I take him three times a week to the club (our insurance pays the membership as many ARRP insurances do).  His routine is to ride and recumbent bike for 30 minutes, chest press, leg press and arm lifts.  Sometimes there is no weight on the machines sometimes I increase it 5 lbs., as he can handle.

 

This the only thing even he says helps.  So, some progress there.  As he also has dementia, I have to keep reminding, that it isn't a cure, but a delaying factor.

 

Hope that helps a little.

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Good for you! You are a wonderful brother. Moving well, not falling, better mood, are just some of the many benefits of exercise in PD. 

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my husband will not exercise on his own ever. we have hired a PT person who comes here once a week for an hour. we go to Dancing for PD class one a week for an hour. We have a volunteer who comes once a week to vist with him and take him for a walk. he does the laundry once a week that gives him some exercise. i drop him off at the grocery store so that he can walk around holding on to the cart and shop which he loves to do. when i remember i take him for a short walk up and down our street which is a dead end and may be a block long.

when he is sitting in his chair which is a lot he never moves a muscle. he sits like a statue. 

everyone who sees him including his doctors tells him exercise is imperative. but ...........................

yes. PD people must exercise if at all possible. Keep after him!!!!!!!

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My hubby has recently started using a forced exercise bike. When he can pedal, he does, but if he can't, the bike keeps his legs and arms moving. It's called the TheraCycle. 200 and works great for hubby. No, I'm not a sales rep for this item, just a pleased customer.

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I'm a big believer in exercise.  My son talked me into a nice two mile walk, which was great but probably over did it for me.  Keep in mind he did the 190 mile Annupurna Circuit in 10 days, so I should know better than letting him set the pace.   Just glad I made the walk OK!

 

I'd be curious on the Theracycle, what happens if you lock up your legs?  Does it freewheel?  Stop the motor?   Just thinking out loud as most stationary bikes do end up on Criagslist very often.  You can buy a used one cheap.   Take a used one, add an electric motor and speed control..... and just set for a reasonable cadence (i.e. 60 rpm at the pedals... adjustable from 30 to 90 rpm).   My concern is the safety issue of how to stop (could add a dead man switch, i.e. you have to grasp  a brake handle to turn the motor on, let go of the handle to turn the motor off). 

 

Used exercise bike = $300;   Electric motor & speed control from an electric treadmill = $300;   Motor mount + bracket (has to be made) = $400.   So a "home built version" for $1000.  

 

Once I started searching on the 'net, looks like there are some $1100 solutions out there.   For someone with limited mobility, and needs both hand and foot movement:  google search showed $1050 Amazon, to $1600.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/HCI-Fitness-eTrainer-Upper-Lower-Body-Passive-Assist-Motorized-Trainer/34231793

 

 

EDIT:  I'm personally after a "Catrike" for bike riding.  I love to cover distance and just cruise.  I can still bicycle fine, but when I stop I shake like crazy (think stop light).  Hence tricycle to keep my balance, be able to stop for a light, and then GO!     http://www.catrike.com/

Edited by TexasTom

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My husband still rides his regular bike. I have offered to buy him a bike with three wheels if he wants to switch. If you are looking for a investment in exercise, you might consider attending the PWR! Retreat in Arizona next year. Week 1 is sold out but there are still spaces in Week 2 (Arizona in June, I know!). Here's the link: http://www.pwr4life.org/retreat/

 

Both my sister and husband have PD and both have benefited more than I can say from the PD specific exercise programs developed for them at the retreats. My  husband had an individual consultation with Dr. Becky Farley, the physical therapist who developed the BIG and PWR! moves programs while he was still working and did some of the exercises. After he retired on disability in 2012, he attended his first retreat. All I can say, is that for us, it was life-changing in terms of his PD management. The difference between just exercising and doing the PD specific exercises is amazing to me. I can tell if my husband hasn't had time to do his PWR! moves and often taking the time to do them will have the marked effect of decreasing his symptoms. Last May, because of his back problems, we weren't sure my husband could even participate in the retreat. He did and by the end of the week was moving ever-so-much better (did not cure the back problem but increased mobility). We have started hiking again! I wasn't sure we'd hike again as  limited as he was last spring. 

Edited by Golden01
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Golden, this is so great to hear  how much exercise has helped your husband.  Isn't it wonderful you and he can start hiking again!

 

I've plans for a variety of kinds of exercises that I hope I can start in a couple of weeks--gym, roller skating, pole walking, and just walking (with friends).  Also some yoga that Gautam on our site has recommended that several of us are going to try.

 

Take care, and enjoy this new-found break in PD symptoms for your husband!

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I am referring to exercises that one can only do sitting, besides walking in a room for a short time.

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Many of the PWR! Moves are done sitting. They teach participants how to do each move sitting, standing, and on  the floor. It adds variety but also makes it appropriate if you have balance or other problems. There is a book you can order on the website too.

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I'm sorry for those that responded about walking exercises for Parkinson's. I made the reply in terms of it being the thread pertaining to me. :)

 

My father has been having a physical therapist come to the house twice a week since the last week of August (excluding two weeks in September).

 

He does the exercises he is instructed to do when they are here and not so much when they are not.

 

He told his neurologist two weeks ago that he doesn't care for them coming, so he told him that he can stop and start back up in about a month. That occurred just days before he was reevaluated for another month and has continued.

 

My concern is what would be the point of stopping if he hasn't been doing even a little more for all these weeks. Then there is the fair enough chance that he won't want to resume after some time because he generally doesn't want to have them come as it is now.

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My hubby can no longer walk for more than a couple of very slow, short steps. He tried to use a treadmill, if you can imagine, and the dead man switch was literally a life saver!

 

As for the theracycle, yes, there is a dead man switch on it, but I make sure that I'm always nearby. The bike keeps his legs moving, even if it's slow. Other than once-a-week PT sessions, this is the only exercise he gets. He fibs to the therapists about his "homework" but that' s another part of advanced PD. Always something new.

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It might be beneficial to try and incorporate tai chi into weekly exercise routines if possible.  My husband has done tai chi at the local senior center for many years now and he credits tai chi with being an amazing exercise program that has saved his life.  One of the main benefits of tai chi is that it works on balance issues which is huge.  Falling down and breaking your hip is a disaster that tai chi may help prevent for a long time.  Tai chi works on your core muscles, focus, and concentration.  The senior center is a great resource that also provides social friendships and support.  Three of our Parkinson's support group attend the morning classes of tai chi at the senior center.  These friendships are a lifeline for one another because Parkinson's can result in social isolation.  In Parkinson's workshops I hear over and over that positive social relationships are a critical part of "wellness."

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I thought I bookmarked the website where a CD of exercises especially designed for PD patients can be bought. Now I cannot find it. Can somebody supply it, please?

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