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Matthew Hulse

Gulf War Veterans with pd.

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Gulfvet    35

Thank you for the link dancing bear. I had a nerve test today at the VA. The neurologist did agree to refer me to the Houston VA PARKINSONS Center. So maybe a few answers are on the horizon thanks to you.

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Linda Garren    725

Gulfvet and others,

 

I am a 20 year AF retiree who would have a hard time connecting my PD to anything service related 18 years after retirement except maybe prolonged exposure to jet engine exhaust.  I salute all you guys from the gulf war campaigns forward and hope our country does right by you all as you richly deserve.  Working with VA on the paperwork, delays  etc is stressful all in itself.

 

I read various veterans newspapers and bring up the following website for your perusal. Perhaps you already know about it.  I don’t endorse the organization without knowing about it but it maybe of assistance.

 

http://parkinsonsaction.org/our-work/veterans/ 

 

 

God Bless You!

 

DB

 

This looks like a wonderful site for veterans, DB!  And I especially like their upfront statement acknowledging veterans' exposure to toxins which can cause Parkinson's:  Unfortunately, our service members are routinely exposed to a wide range of toxins and hazards that may lead to the development of Parkinson’s disease. PAN works to ensure that veterans living with Parkinson’s disease have access to the care and benefits they have earned.  I imagine a veteran finding out s(he) has PD would be greatly encouraged by this, especially when they are just starting out their journey.

Edited by Linda Garren

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bq173    0

First and foremost to my fellow veterans thanks for your service and Welcome Home!

 

My question for any of you that is in the VA system, has anyone gone through a C+P exam for Aide and Assistance compensation and if so what did it entail? I have received a rating but it was knocked back a peg or two for gathering of evidence.

 

Hope everyone is well,

Bryan

173rd Airborne VN

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Linda Garren    725

Obama Administration Attempts to Cut Bipartisan Veterans’ Choice Card Program

obama-300x200.jpgBy – Peter A. Finocchio

In the wake of the disturbing news of neglect and maltreatment at VA hospitals last year, Congress responded in part by passing the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014, legislation that enables veteran patients to qualify for care at non-VA health care if they have been unable to schedule an appointment at a VA hospital or reside a difficult journey from such a facility. The legislation passed the House 265-160, passed the Senate 93-3, and was signed into law by President Obama on August 7th of last year. AMAC was proud to support this legislation and we were glad that at a time when so much in Washington is defined by partisanship and gridlock, both parties could come together so effectively to support a commonsense measure that helps ensure that America’s veterans receive the care that they need.

 

This is why it is so distressing to see that President Obama’s budget, at the recommendation of his new Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald, is proposing to cut part of the $10 billion in funding for the new Choice Card program. While McDonald said that the cut “wasn’t meant to be controversial,” it risks compromising the health security of our nation’s veterans and has stirred significant opposition from leaders of both parties in Congress. Congressman Jeff Miller (R-FL), Chairman of the House Veterans Affairs’ Committee has rightly denounced a reallocation of the Choice Card funds as a “non-starter.” Senator John McCain (R-AZ), a veteran himself, remarked that it is “totally unacceptable that the administration would attempt to subvert the will of Congress and deny veterans the health care choices they’ve earned and deserve.” New Hampshire Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D) and Kelly Ayotte ® have written a joint letter to the President opposing his proposed cuts and have jointly introduced legislation to make the Choice Card program permanent.

 

A new poll from Concerned Veterans for America shows that nearly nine out of ten veterans believe officials need to increase health care choices for VA patients, including access to private care physicians. More choice was both the intent and the effect of the Choice Card program. Since November 1st, over 8 million cards have been issued. Veterans are taking advantage of this program and are depending on it. For the President to consider compromising this effective and popular program, over vocal objections from leaders in both parties, suggests that he is out of touch with the needs of veterans. AMAC will continue to monitor this situation and hopes that President Obama will relent on this proposal. We are grateful for the leadership of New Hampshire Senators Shaheen (D) and Ayotte ® in defending the Choice Card program and applaud their legislative efforts to make it permanent. AMAC is proud to represent a large number of veterans among our 1.2 million members. We owe it to our members and to our nation to provide those who risked their lives to defend our freedom.

Edited by Linda Garren

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Linda Garren    725

Brain Wave “Miracle” Helps Returning Soldiers Suffering With PTSD

Posted 01/13/2015 | AMAC Authors, In The News, Press Releases

veteranflag1-300x199.jpgAMAC says Magnetic Resonance Therapy may help Autism & Alzheimer’s patients

WASHINGTON, DC, Jan 13 – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD] has been the bane of many veterans who fought in the Iraq and Afghan wars, causing insomnia, panic attacks, alcohol abuse and even suicidal thoughts.  Until now, there were few, if any, effective treatment alternatives.  But, a new procedure using Magnetic Resonance Therapy developed at the Brain Treatment Center may hold the key to a cure.

 

Veterans who have successfully undergone the MRT treatment use terms like “miracle,” “game-changer” and “waking up” to describe the results they achieved at the BTC facility in Newport Beach, CA.

 

PTSD, according to the Association of Mature American Citizens, is “what we used to call ‘battle fatigue’ or ‘shell shock’ and it manifests itself in a variety of debilitating ways.  Returning soldiers are awakened in the midst of war-based nightmares.  They experience panic attacks and some harbor thoughts of taking their own lives.  One report showed an 80% increase in suicides among soldiers returning from the war fronts in the Middle East during the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

 

AMAC is keeping a watchful eye on the MRT treatment alternative because of its potentially effective use in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.  “But, the fact that it is helping our wounded warriors to cope with the aftermath of war is an important first focus.”

 

Many of the PTSD treatments to date have focused on the symptoms of the disorder; the MRT procedure appears to concentrate on the workings of the brain, itself.  As Dr. Kevin T. Murphy, Vice Chair of the Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, UC San Diego Medical Center, put it: “Addressing the core frequency mismatch that occurs in various parts of the brain, and not the patient’s symptoms per se, allows this system to be potentially useful in numerous psychological and neurological disorders, from autism to Alzheimers.”

 

Dr. Yi Jin, medical director of the Brain Treatment Center, is careful in an encouraging way when he describes the successes of the BTC’s new therapeutic approach.  “We are not claiming efficacy, but we are seeing clinical responses that are positive.”

 

Both Murphy and Jin are believers and intent on proving the efficacy of their approach.  As Murphy, whose 10-year-old son is afflicted with Asperger’s syndrome, told Richard Leiby, a senior writer at the Washington Post: “Right now it’s like we’re selling snake oil.  It’s hard to believe, and if I hadn’t had my own son treated, I wouldn’t have believed it.”

The child underwent months of therapy and has shown extraordinary improvement as a result.

 

Likewise, Iraqi war veteran Jon Warren says he recovered from acute PTSD after he was treated with Magnetic Resonance Therapy.  He no longer suffers from the extreme combat flashbacks and nightmares that made him dysfunctional.  They set “my [brain] frequencies right” and his life is returning to normal.

 

 

Please see also the following article from the Washington Post which is a little more detailed:

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/brain-zapping-veterans-say-experimental-ptsd-treatment-has-changed-their-lives/2015/01/12/2fc8b3ca-58aa-11e4-8264-deed989ae9a2_story.html

 

Linda

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johnnys    460

Hi Linda,

Just to be frank.All this experimenting on veterans is very sad.The VA knows all to well how to make veterans well but that would go against the professional model.Not all doctors are for it but then you don't work for the VA long if you object.

John

Vietnam 68-69

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ortizmo    5

I have never served in armed force's but I am a proud American that gratefully enjoys the benefits that of living in this great country.I have an enormous sense of gratitude toward those who have fought,gave the ultimate sacrifice and served this amazing country.

 

To all that are currently serving and to our vets where ever you may be: Thank you Thank you Thank you,From the bottom of my heart.

 

John

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Chase3610    4

Thank you for these insightful posts. I returned from the Gulf back in the 90's with a resting tremor in my left hand and shooting nerve pain in my extremities. Fast forward 24 years, and now I am dealing with generalized dystonia and parkinsonism. I take Sinemet 5 times a day with Amantadine to deal with the parkinsonism and get Botox shots for the dystonia. My MDS won't call what I have Parkinson's Disease (but medicates me like a PWP), and after all these years I could care less how it is labeled. I just want to feel better, and after 2 1/2 decades without answers I feel I am making some progress towards that end.

 

What has also changed is how the VA is now looking at claims by veterans of unexplained nervous system disorders. In the 90s those of us who complained were called malingerers, pychosomatic, and emotionally troubled. Years later more of our bretheren are coming home from the Gulf with some of the same unexplained symptoms. A few of the VA doctors are seeing a pattern and are open to the idea that there may be something to this "Gulf-War-Syndrome". I was shocked to recently receive a decision from VA that my current problems are considered service-related. I think the VA's recent troubles have sparked some changes in the processing of claims. There may be hope for veterans with parkinson's to get a more enlightened look at their claims in the near future.

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Linda Garren    725

I wasn't sure where to post this, but think it might be appropriate here.  I was dumbfounded when I read this.

 

 

Ban The Flag Initiative At The University of California Is ‘Discouraging and Disheartening,’ says AMAC
Posted 03/12/2015 | AMAC Authors, In The News, Press Releases
 

beautiful-american-flag-screensaver-300xIt signals “a loss of love for our country”

 

WASHINGTON, DC, Mar 13 – The recent incident at the University of California at Irvine in which the undergraduate legislative council

passed a measure banning the American Flag on campus is a cause for concern, according to Dan Weber, president of the Association

of Mature American Citizens.

 

The school’s executive cabinet of UC’s Associated Students was quick to veto what it called the “misguided legislation.”   But now an

online letter is circulating with upwards of 1,200 signatures, including those of more than five dozen UC professors, and it supports the

original ban the flag initiative, according to the Leadership Institute Web site Campus Reform.  The letter reads, in part, “that nationalism,

ncluding U.S. nationalism, often contributes to racism and xenophobia.”

 

Weber said that he was “hurt” by these developments because “it shed light on the lack of knowledge, bordering on outright ignorance,

that pervades our schools today.  I am saddened by the loss of love and respect for our country among some of America’s youth and their

educators.”  He said that “radical and misguided notions of the near-term and long-term history of America, a glaring dismissal of the

heritage and traditions of our country and the erosion of confidence in the exceptionalism that made us a model for the world have

crept into our lives.  And, unless we can push back the tide of pessimism and defeat that plague the next generation, life as we know

it and knew it will continue to evolve in the wrong direction.”

 

Weber said he is concerned about “the new wave of educators who teach our children and young adults in a manner that is politically

correct, but divisively and distortedly incorrect.”

 

He said that there is much anecdotal evidence in our schools today that hint at the frighteningly subtle indoctrination of young students. 

He cited the school that suspended a 13-year-old middle schooler because he had a gun shaped birth mark on his leg.  At another

school a teacher told an 18-year-old girl to leave the class because she said “God bless you” to a fellow student who had sneezed,

he noted.

 

“But the ban the flag movement at the University of California takes the cake,” Weber lamented.  “It’s discouraging and disheartening

to see such disrespect for the banner that symbolizes all that is good with this country.”

 

The UC student behind the ban is Michael Guevara, and he wrote that: “The American flag has been flown in instances of colonialism

and imperialism.  Flags not only serve as symbols of patriotism or weapons for nationalism, but also construct cultural mythologies

and narratives that in turn charge nationalistic sentiments.”

 

Weber wondered how young Mr. Guevara came to think that way.  The AMAC chief added: “The millions of immigrants who populated

our nation came here because of the opportunities available to them that were not available in any other country on earth.  They came

here to work and they did, creating a land where a person with the ambition and the will to succeed does, in fact, succeed.  This is a

land where one Conservative President told off the liberal rabble: ‘Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for

your country.’  That president was John F. Kennedy, a loyal Democrat of a different stripe.”

 

NOTE TO EDITORS: Dan Weber is available for telephone interviews on this issue.  Editors/reporters may contact John Grimaldi at

917-846-8485 or jpgrimaldi@verizon.net to set up a call.

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MurrayPD2    217

I hope this is a good spot to post this....

 

I got my VA Medical Benefits and, of course, they are sending me to a Neuro after talking to a general practice PA.  After that, I talked to the PDARECC Hotline and they said I should be going straight to a PADRECC location.  Thankfully, there is one in Texas (the ONLY one in Central US- but there are Consortium Centers all over). 

 

I generally have two questions.  Did any of you end up using a specialist or Neurologist with the VA as your main care provider?  In either facility, how do you like the care you receive?  I am just getting to know my MDS and had about 4 visits with my Neurologist, but I am not just flowing with money and it sounds like there are good specialists at the PADRECC. 

 

I was seen by my first VA PCP Monday, then I have a Gulf War exam later this week, and a Neurologist visit next week.  I just got approved about 3 weeks ago, so things are really moving along now that I am finally "in".  I imagine a PADRECC takes a while to get in to. 

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Gulfvet    35

The padrecc in Houston is a big center. I was referred to a neuromuscular specialists there for suspected motor neuron disease. So I can't specifically comment on the pd clinic but it took me two weeks from my referral to my appointment and have two more follow up appointments already scheduled. I can say Houston is a very nice center. And give yourself plenty of time to find a parking space.

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dgoram    0

I'm a Gulf War Veteran with PD. I have made one post here a year or so back. I was diagnosed by Civilian Neurologist back in 2012. I was diagnosed with Restless Leg Syndrome back in the late 90's. I'm surprised that there are so few of us on here. I know on facebook there are pages for Gulf War Illness. This to me is a better forum, I would like to know how many veteran's have PD and if the VA is more or less reluctant to make the diagnoses compared to a Neurologist in the private sector?       

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Gulfvet    35

My experience was not a lack of willingness to diagnose at the VA but a lack of experienced neurologist. Fortunately I moved and ended up going to the Dallas Texas VAMC, they have a team of exceptional neurologist to include a well known MDS. 

On my first visit to Dallas I was scheduled for an emg by the ALS clinic. The test was performed two weeks later. At the conclusion of the test the neuromuscular specialist said she was pleasantly surprised. But that left another problem of no diagnosis. She left the exam room for a few minutes and returned with three other neurologists, they spent a hour in the room with me. I was sent home with a year supply of c/l.

Four weeks later I returned to the MDS who confirmed my diagnosis within the first ten minutes without any hesitation.

 

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New normal    1,268

I've posted on other sites..FYI, DH Vietnam vet. DH was dx'd PD a year ago.  Applied for VA about six months ago.  problem, he was in Navy and his ship was not .listed among  blue water ships that were designated for neuro problems. However in his med records it said he was  injured in Vietnam.

His first vist to VA was to "register".  Doctor said it was not a dx appt...merely to add his name to the register of dx.  DH showed him a scrap book of px that showed his destroyer linked to a river  boat...and junkets nearby...which proved his ship was in coastal waters.  He had no potable water...,they used sea water for everything.

Three weeks later, he got a VA letter from that dr. saying he was dx'd with PD caused by Agent Orange.  Hmmmm.so why did dr say it was a register appt?  It worked for us...just sayin'.. We were glad we took scrap book...we think it helped us. 

We await percentage and benefits.  God bless you all...hope it works out for you.

NN

 

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MurrayPD2    217

I can't see the link from this computer, but I will look at it and share.  I finally got TBI Service Connected (10%).  In the exam, they told me it was hard to tell which symptoms were PD or TBI.  Since 2008 (TBI), there is a pretty good indication of health decline.  I was in Saudi in '95 and in Iraq in 2005... They have not agreed on any connection this far. :( 

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