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jds6958

Ongoing Case Study - Nutritional Protocol - Attacking PD with Everything

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Hello, once again it is your resident guinea pig case study representing the most all-inclusive data supported nutritional tactics in PD management.

 

There has been some significant updates since the last thread.  I hope this one will be of more long-term value.

PURPOSE:  There is a LOT of good information and disinformation related to nutritional tactics intended to manage Parkinson’s Disease.  My goal is in 20 years to be able to look back and know that I tried everything possible to minimize the impact PD has on the quality of my life.

 

PD HISTORY:

 

2012 – Occasional difficulty swallowing, walking slower, minimal sense of smell (realized later)

 

2013 – Fatigue, left index finger tremor, apathy

 

MARCH 2014 – Official PD diagnosis based on neurologist observations and positive response to L-DOPA (Sinemet) Began taking 5mg x 2 of Selegiline.  Symptoms subsided.

 

APRIL 2014 – Began nutritional protocol

 

JUNE 2014 – Discontinued Selegiline.  Symptoms did not return.  Felt better than had in years.

NOVEMBER 2014 – Series of very stressful events, minimal exercise and reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms, including all previous symptoms and new symptoms related to a significant loss of balance, tremor occurrence and severity, dizziness, severe fatigue and other typical PD issues.  Selegiline resumed and 90% of symptoms disappeared.  The nutritional protocol has been adjusted based on new research.  Discipline to the nutritional protocol has been elevated and re-established.

 

PROTOCOL THEORETICAL TACTICS:

·      Remove neurotoxins and limit exposure to any new known neurotoxins.

·      Create an environment that best supports neurons (more sleep / less stress)

·      Support the neuron mitochondria for adequate cellular energy (glucose)

·      Support glucose alternate neuron cellular energy through the ketone process bypassing the issues of mitochondria deficiencies (ketone)

·      Directly address the common anti-oxidant deficiencies and excessive free radicals that is a cause of additional neural stress.

·      Minimize or remove the neural swelling that is a cause of additional neural stress.

·      Increase the ability to create dopamine.

 

COMMON QUESTIONS

 

1) How long does it take to manage the protocol?

On average, it takes me 68 minutes every two weeks to order and inventory product, and to fill two weeks worth of pill organizers.  Outside of exercise, taking the supplements is minimal and is usually included in daily activities such as work, driving, watching TV, etc.  However, if you do this the hard way, it could be frustrating and take a lot of time.  Currently, the protocol has little to no impact on my time, which is important because I run two businesses and I have a family.

 

2)  How much does it cost to follow the protocol as outlined below?

If in the United States, and buying online from the most discounted sources, supplements only would be about $6,689.15 annually, or $557.43 per month.  Most would agree that is a lot of money for an unproven protocol.  I also agree.  I even have to pay more because I do not live in the United States.

 

3) Are there risks?
Yes, there are always risks.  You could spend a lot of money for little gain in health.  You could have an adverse reaction and cause harm to yourself.  However, most of these products are known to be very safe and have known benefits outside of helping with only Parkinson’s disease.  Do your own do diligence and make your own decisions.

 

4) Some of the data is only theoretical, or based on animal studies, why would you include that in your protocol?
If I was nutritionist or doctor advising a patient, I would tell the patient to wait for more human clinical research.  That is the “safe” answer.  However, I currently have Parkinson’s disease today, right now.  The only solution that currently exists for PD does not reverse, stop, or slow progression.  This means that my PD is worse today than it was yesterday.  Unless I find another solution, then that will always be true.  Current medication only hides the problem for a time, until it bites you in the face later.  At that point, knowing my personality, 20 years later, I would be filled with great regret and despair knowing I did not try everything I could when I could.   Knowing the time tested safety of all of these products, the biggest risk is to my pocket book.  I have a wonderful wife and three small children, and it makes me happy today knowing I am trying everything possible to provide to my family the best version of myself that I can.  It could take five years or more for human clinical trials to occur, if even then.  In PD world, five years is an eternity.  In addition, many of these nutritional tactics work synergistically.  Clinical trials like to test these things individually, which destroys the whole theory of this protocol.  I act on the data I have today.  I do not have the luxury of waiting for data that may or may not exist tomorrow.  I will make my own data based on my own results and through my own decisions.

 

5)  Would you recommend this protocol to others?

Not likely.  All I know is that it worked for some time, but stopped working as the protocol could not handle significant stress.  Admittingly, my discipline to the protocol was lacking during this time as well.  This means that the protocol certainly provides value in managing PD, but it is difficult to tell to what extent.  More data and time is needed.  I share the protocol because there might be others like me who hate PD as much as I do and want to do everything possible to neutralize PD symptoms or the disease itself.  If such other persons exist, we can share data and results, and learn from it.

 

RECENT CHANGES:

 

1)   Minimizing stress is essential.  I have managed to eliminate recent stress and introduce stability.  To the best of my ability, I will try to control my environment and reactions to my circumstances.  Stress is a nuclear bomb to PD and I was not prepared for that.
 

2)   Discipline in exercise is critical.  I allowed myself to be lazy because I was feeling great.  The protocol is a life long decision.  Not following the protocol exactly as I designed it proved disastrous.  I suffered the consequences and I have learned from it.
 

3)   I realized that I needed to provide my neurons an alternative energy source that is not primary dependent upon glucose.  Glucose utilization is inefficient in Parkinson’s patients, and thus I was not remotely equipped to handle recent stress.  My brain became starved for energy and I lost my gain in my ability to produce my own dopamine.  Thus, ketones has been added to the protocol.  In addition, nicotine as an antoxident/neuroprotectant, ginger as antoxident/neuroprotectant, and melatonin as a antoxident/neuroprotectant and sleep aid have been added to the protocol due to the outcome of additional research.
 

4)   I will begin the new changes in the nutritional protocol, along with the necessary discipline in all aspects beginning December 1, 2014.  I plan on reducing Selegiline by 50% on February 1 2015, and pending that outcome, then reducing Selegiline by 100% on April 1, 2015.

 

THE PROTOCOL

 

Sleep

Adequate sleep is critical for neural health.  Some of the primary functions of sleep is to detoxify the brain of toxic substances that accumulated throughout the day, eliminate free radicals, restore vital nutrients, and repair and restore damaged cells.  Because Parkinson's is a chronic neural disease, inadequate sleep would only accelerate disease progression whereas sufficient sleep would contribute to slowing down progression.  In addition, "The Protocol" is primarily based on nutrition.  Sufficient sleep enables the brain to take full advantage of the nutrition that "The Protocol" makes available.  Sleep is foundational to "The Protocol."

Recommendation:  Minimum of 8.5 hours of quality sleep per day.  Wake up naturally instead of with an alarm.  If your body needs more sleep, then let it sleep.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

 

Exercise

Besides all of the regular benefits and increased general wellness of exercise, Parkinson's patients benefit greatly with a disciplined exercise program.  Parkinson's threatens mobility control and balance, whereas exercise can enhance these things.  Exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which is the delivery system of all of the nutrients found in "The Protocol."  Exercises assists the body with various types of stress, which allows the body to focus on healing instead of managing stress.  Lastly, sweating is a means of your body to rid yourself of toxins.  Toxins residing in the brain is believed to be the number one cause of Parkinson's.

Recommendation:  Minimum of 20 minutes of cardio 3 times per week (60-80% maximum heart rate).  Full body resistance training once per week, or divided into muscle groups throughout the week.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3

 

 

Stress Management

Stress has shown to amplify Parkinson’s symptoms and quickly accelerate cell death.  Stress alone has been clinically shown in animals to actually create Parkinson’s disease.  Positive thinking and mitigating stressful situations are not only ideal, but critical.  When the body is fighting stress, it is not as focused on healing or repairing your cells, tissues, or body systems.  A Parkinson's patient needs to maximize the body's ability to heal, restore, and maintain cellular function.  Create a daily routine and try to stick with it.

Recommendation:  Identify consistent and predictable stress in your life and work to minimize environmental stressors and when not possible, at minimum, learn how to control your reaction to such stress in the most positive way.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3Research 4

 

Neural and Body Detox (Clinoptilolite) ($359.94/Annually)

Research as shown that most cases of Parkinson's are caused by environmental toxins, primary cause toxins being metals and/or pesticides.  Our bodies can only process out so many toxins per day.  Too many toxins causes our body to "quarantine" toxins in places so they are no longer in our blood stream.  When this happens, those toxins can damage area cells.  As long as those toxins are still there, slowing down Parkinson's progression is an uphill battle.  First, we need to remove the toxins to, in theory, remove the cause.  ZeoForce has clinical studies showing the safe removal of toxins, processed out via urine.

Recommendation:  We recommend purchasing two large containers to simplify your nutritional supplementation. 

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3Research 4Research 5Research 6; Research 7; also recent anti cancer benefits have been published Research 8

 

Pill Organizer (2 Containers, Large, 4x Day, 7 Days a Week)

The rest of "The Protocol" focuses on supplemental nutrition.  This will become a lot of pills.  If you do not like taking pills, this will be difficult for you.  Even if taking pills does not bother you, managing them could be frustrating and complicated.  Thus, in the spirit of "Stress Management" here are a couple suggestions.       1) Order 2-3 large pill organizers.  2) On your supplement containers, note on them when and how often per day each is taken.  For example, for a pill that is taken 2 x morning, 0 x lunch, 1 x evening, 0 x bedtime, you may want to write "2-0-1-0" on that bottle.  Then, refilling your pill container(s) each week is simplified.  Keep 3 months of inventory of each product on a dedicated shelf or large cabinet.  When a product is emptied, set it aside.  When you are finished filling your pill containers, use the empty product bottles serve as your trigger to order that product discounted online and shipped directly to your house.  If this takes you more than 90 minutes every two weeks, then you can still do better at this process.

 

Coenzyme Q10 ($920.71/Annually)

Research has shown that 1,200 mg daily reduced average Parkinson's Disease progression by 44% over a period of 16 months.  The suspected reason for this is because CoQ10 supports cellular mitochondria, slowing down the death of neurons in the substantia nigra.  Parkinson's patients are often deficient in coenzyme Q10 and have dysfunctional mitochondria.  Mitochondria are the "energy factories" of cells.  In the case of Parkinson’s, dysfunctional mitochondria can result in cellular dysfunction (temporarily no dopamine, but restorable) or neural cell death (permanent dopamine loss).  Several doctors recommend 2,000 mg a day.​

Recommendation:  800mg at morning, 400mg at lunch, 400mg at evening, and 400mg at bedtime. (adjust slowly if it upsets stomach)

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3Research 4Research 5Research 6;

 

Reishi (Ganoderma Lucidum) ($280.88/Annually)

Abundant evidence has suggested that neuroinflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The emerging evidence has supported that microglia may play key roles in the progressive neurodegeneration in PD and might be a promising therapeutic target. Ganoderma lucidum (GL), a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has been shown potential neuroprotective effects in clinical trials that suggests that it might possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties. ​

Recommendation:  540mg at morning, 540mg at lunch, and 540mg at evening

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

 

B Vitamins (Fully Active)(LypoSpheric) ($436.80/Annually)

The B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins that are required as coenzymes for reactions essential for cellular function.  Folate and choline are believed to be central methyl donors required for mitochondrial protein and nucleic acid synthesis through their active forms, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and betaine, respectively. Cobalamin (B12) may assist methyltetrahydrofolate in the synthesis of methionine, a cysteine source for glutathione biosynthesis. Pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine (B6) seem to be involved in the regeneration of tetrahydrofolate into the active methyl-bearing form and in glutathione biosynthesis from homocysteine.  ​

Recommendation:  Take 1 packet at morning, do not eat for at least 15 minutes

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2; Research 3

 

NAC ($45.56/Annually)

Once it is in the bloodstream, NAC gets converted into glutathione, which is a potent antioxidant that is also made by the body.  It is unclear whether the low glutathione content in the PD substantia nigra is due to impaired production, or because the burden of free-radicals is excessive.  Several links exist between the two mechanisms of neuronal degeneration (i.e., oxygen radical production and mitochondrial damage) proposed to have a role in Parkinson's disease. Indeed, mitochondria are critical targets for the toxic injury induced by oxygen radicals, and experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial damage may cause an increased generation of oxygen radicals. A potentially important link between these two mechanisms of neurodegeneration is glutathione. Because of the scavenging activity of glutathione against accumulation of oxygen radicals, its decrease in the brains of parkinsonian patients has been interpreted as a sign of oxidative stress; however, this change may also result from or lead to mitochondrial damage. It is conceivable therefore that regardless of whether oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage represents the initial insult, these toxic mechanisms may both contribute to neuronal degeneration via changes in glutathione levels.​

Recommendation:  600mg at lunch, and 600mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3

 

L-Tyrosine ($45.92/Annually)

A study published in 1982 in "Life Sciences" indicates that L-tyrosine may benefit people with Parkinson's disease. Researchers administered 100 mg/kg of L-tyrosine to each of the 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. According to the researchers, L-tyrosine alleviates the symptoms of Parkinson's disease by increasing the levels of dopamine in the brain.​

Recommendation:  500mg at lunch, 500mg at evening and 500mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

 

 

Vitamin D3 ($6.00/Annually)

Parkinson's disease patients are deficient in D3 and research has shown that D3 slows PD progression.​   The results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial reported online on March 13, 2013 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveal a benefit for vitamin D supplementation in men and women with Parkinson's disease.

Recommendation:  5000iu at evening 

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2; Research 3

 

Astaxanthin ($137.41/Annually)

ATX suppresses MPP+-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells via the HO-1/NOX2 axis. ATX should be strongly considered as a potential neuroprotectant and adjuvant therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease.​  In a recent study, researchers found that Astaxanthin blocked the MPP+ related Heme oxygenase process implicated in nerve and brain cell damage. This type of oxidative damage has been linked to Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

Recommendation:  4mg at morning, 4mg at lunch, 4mg at evening and 4mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

 

Omega 3 ($139.47/Annually)

Researchers observed that when mice were fed an omega-3 rich diet, they seemed immune to the effect of MPTP, a toxic compound that causes the same damage to the brain as Parkinson’s. This compound, which has been used for more than 20 years in Parkinson’s research, works faster than the disease itself and is just as effective in targeting and destroying the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain.  

Recommendation:  500/250 of Omega 3/DHA at morning, noon, evening, and bedtime 

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3

 

Chaga (Dihydroxybenzalacetone) ($128.43/Annually)

Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). 3,4-Dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL) is a small catechol-containing compound isolated from Chaga (Inonotus obliquus [persoon] Pilat), and has been reported to have beneficial bioactivities, including antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumorigenic activities, with a relatively low toxicity to normal cells.  Quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibitor, abolished the protective effect of DBL against 6-OHDA. Furthermore, DBL activated stress-associated kinases such as Akt, ERK, and p38 MAPK, and PI3K or Akt inhibitors, but not ERK, p38, or JNK inhibitors, diminished DBL-induced glutathione synthesis and protection against 6-OHDA. These results suggest that DBL activates the Nrf2/glutathione pathway through PI3K/Akt, and improves survival of SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity.​​

Recommendation:  350mg at morning, 350mg at evening and 350mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

 

Horse Chestnut (Triterpenoids) ($27.09/Annually)

A class of antioxidants called synthetic triterpenoids blocked development of Parkinson's in an animal model.  In Parkinson's patients you can clearly see a significant overload of oxidative stress, which is why antioxidents provide significant positive results to PD patients.  Preliminary evidence indicates the synthetic triterpenoids also increase Nrf2 activity in astrocytes, a brain cell type which nourishes neurons and hauls off some of their garbage. 

Recommendation:  400mg at evening 

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

 

Green Tea (GTPs) ($55.00/Annually)

GTPs have antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities.There have been some studies suggesting that these compounds could have a neuroprotective effect and possibly even a treatment effect in PD.The Chinese Ministry of Health and the Michael J. Fox Foundation, with the assistance of Dr. Caroline Tanner of the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center in Sunnyvale, CA (NPF Center of Excellence) are currently studying whether GTPs can slow the progression of PD in a large, placebo-controlled study.

Recommendation:  350mg at lunch, and 350mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

 

Glutathione (GSH)(LypoSpheric) ($767.40/Annually)

A powerful antioxidant and those with PD are often deficient.  GSH does well in eliminating free radicals and neurotoxins and in fact, often called the mother antioxidant.  PD is known to be caused by neurotoxins and neurons are also under oxidative stress. Lypo spheric delivery of GSH avoids destruction by the digestive process and ensures the best possible delivery into the blood stream. This avoids the need for intraveneously taking GSH.

Recommendation:  Take 1 packet at morning, do not eat for at least 15 minutes

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2

 

Vitamin C (Fully Active)(LypoSpheric) ($872.80/Annually)
Parkinson's disease patients given large doses of oral vitamin C and synthetic vitamin E supplements (3000mg and 3200 IU daily respectively) delayed the progression of their disease to the point where they needed l-dopa 2.5 years later than a group of patients who were not taking supplements.  Later research has shown that synthetic vitamin E in itself does not retard the progression of Parkinson's disease.  Thus it is likely that it was vitamin C by itself or its combination with vitamin E that was the active component in Dr. Fahn's experiment.  This fits with a later finding that vitamin E, a fat-soluble vitamin, does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier nor does it accumulate in the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain.  Vitamin C, on the other hand, while not crossing the blood-brain barrier does enter the cerebrospinal fluid and can be found there in concentrations proportional to dietary intake.  Inasmuch as vitamin C is a highly effective antioxidant and is particularly adept in quenching hydroxyl radicals (the main culprits in the dopamine-cell destruction), it is becoming increasingly clear that this vitamin may be an excellent protector against Parkinson's disease and can materially help in slowing down the progression of the disease.
Recommendation:  Take 1 packet at morning and afternoon on an empty stomach.  Do not eat for 15 minutes

 

Resveratrol  ($124.54/Annually)

Resveratrol attenuates 6 hydroxydopamine induced oxidative damage and dopamine depletion in rat model of Parkinson's disease.  Furthermore, resveratrol treatment also significantly decreased the levels of COX-2 and TNF-alpha mRNA in the substantia nigra as detected by real-time RT-PCR. COX-2 protein expression in the substantia nigra was also decreased as evidenced by Western blotting. These results demonstrate that resveratrol exerts a neuroprotective effect on 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease rat model, and this protection is related to the reduced Inflammatory reaction.

Recommendation:  200mg at lunch, and 200mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Pending Research;

 

Amino Acids  ($134.40/Annually)

Amino acids stimulate nerve cells to produce dopamine and prevent degenerative changes of neurons in the substantia nigra. This results in the reduction of neurological symptoms and improvement of rigidity, bradykinesis, gait and cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson’s disease. When administering amino acid compounds, administration of levodopa can be reduced, thus reducing the side effects of the treatment.

Recommendation:  4 capsules at morning, 4 capsules at evening

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2;

 

Iron (Gentle Iron Recommended)  ($26.19/Annually)

Increased iron levels in the blood are associated with a decreased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to a new study which appears in the June 2013 issue of PLoS One.  Estimated higher iron levels in the blood are associated with a three percent reduction in the risk of Parkinson’s disease for every 10 µg/dL increase in iron. Gentle iron is recommended to avoid digestive issues.

Recommendation:  18mg at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2;

 

L-Carnosine ($224.28/Annually)

Carnosine has been studied in Parkinson’s disease. The addition of the neuropeptide carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) as a food additive to the basic protocol of Parkinson's disease treatment results in significant improvement of neurological symptoms, along with increase in red blood cell Cu/Zn-SOD and decrease in blood plasma protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides, with no noticeable change in platelets MAO B activity. The combination of carnosine with basic therapy may be a useful way to increase efficiency of PD treatment.

Recommendation:  500mg at morning, 500mg at lunch, and 500mg at evening 

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2;
*Pepper E, Farrell M, Nord G, Finkel S. Antiglycation effects of carnosine and other compounds on the long-term survival of Escherichia coli.Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2010;76(24): 7925-7930.

 

Lipoic Acid (LypoSpheric and Capsules) ($767.40/Annually)

Lipoic acid protects brain tissue from the long-term effects of advanced glycation end products and the resulting inflammation and oxidative damage, conditions that lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Lipoic acid reduces amyloid-beta-induced inflammation and improves brain cells’ production of the chemical signaling molecules called neurotransmitters. Mitochondrial function is significantly impaired in the brains of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease patients and lipoic acid decreases mitochondrial oxidant stress in those cells.

Recommendation:  1 R-ALA LypoSpheric packet in the morning at least 15 minutes before breakfast, 250mg (R-ALA capsule) at evening, 250mg (R-ALA capsule) at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3; Research 4

 

L-Carnitine ($40.19/Annually)

Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid affect rotenone-induced damage in nigral dopaminergic neurons of rat brain, implication for Parkinson's disease therapy.

Recommendation:  500mg at lunch

Research or Scientific Support:Research 1Research 2

 

PQQ (Pyrroloquinoline Quinone):   ($219.36/Annually)

PQQ dramatically inhibits fibril formation in C-terminal-truncated α-Syn, as well as in mixtures of full-length α-Syn with truncated variants. Moreover, PQQ decreases the cytotoxicity of truncated α-Syn. Together with other findings on the inhibitors of amyloid proteins, this suggests that inhibitors other than PQQ, which also bind to target proteins, could prevent the aggregation and fibrillation of truncated α-Syn in a similar manner. In any case, PQQ is a strong candidate for a reagent compound in the treatment of PD and related diseases.

Recommendation:  20mg at evening

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2Research 3Research 4

 

Curcumin:   ($90.48/Annually)

Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD.

Recommendation:  630mg at lunch

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

 

Caffeine:  (pills - not soda or coffee) 

There have been several recent studies suggesting that caffeine may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by offering neural protective support. In a recent edition of the journal Neurology, there is a new study suggesting that caffeine may be a reasonable treatment for the Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms. Because caffeine is a drug (though found naturally) and not considered nutritional support, some may opt to not include this in "The Protocol."

Recommendation:  200mg to 400mg per day, preferably not after 3pm and not in the form of sugary drinks.  Increase dosage slowly.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

 

Nicotine:  (gum/patch)

“Nicotine has separate mechanisms by which it may protect brain cells, aside from its influence on dopamine,” Boyd says. “One of the functions of nicotinic receptors is to moderate the entry of calcium into cells. The presence of nicotine increases the amount of intracellular calcium, which appears to improve cellular survival.”  Because nicotine is a drug (though found naturally) and not considered nutritional support, some may opt to not include this in "The Protocol."

Recommendation:  6-10mg at 2mg dosages spread throughout the day.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3

 

DHEA (7-KETO):   ($96.27Anually)

Low DHEA-S is correlated with Parkinson’s and also naturally decreases with age.  DHEA has been shown to help with Parkinson’s symptoms and combat aging in general.  DHEA helps with inflammation, which is a known problem in the region of the brain affected by Parkinson's disease. 7-Keto is a form of DHEA that does not convert into testosterone and estrogen and is recommended over regular DHEA. DHEA is an actual hormone and it is first recommended that you see a doctor or complete labs to determine if your DHEA levels are low enough to warrant supplementation.

Recommendation:  100mg DHEA 7-Keto at morning (25mg if female)

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

5 HTP:   ($39.87/Annually)

5-HTP is the precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin which regulates mood and combats depression. Commercially available 5-HTP is obtained from the seeds of the plant Griffonia simplicifolia. 5-HTP has been suggested as a treatment for Parkinson's to assist with the commonly associated depression symptoms

Recommendation:  200mg before bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2

 

MK-7; VItamin K-2:   ($35.64/Annually)

Vitamin K2 plays a role in the energy production of defective mitochondria. Because defective mitochondria are also found in Parkinson's patients with a PINK1 or Parkin mutation, vitamin K2 potentially offers hope for a new treatment for Parkinson's. Studies using fruit flies have shown positive results.

Recommendation:  100 mcg at breakfast

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1Research 2

 

Probiotic:   ($59.96/Annually)

Parkinson's disease patients showed improvement in multiple symptoms of the disease after being treated for Helicobacter pylori infection, researchers reported. Probiotics are a great alternative to antibiotics to replace bad bacteria with good bacteria.

Recommendation:  1 capsule before bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2

 

Ginger:  ($29.76/Annually)

6-Shogaol [1-(4-hydroxy-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-one], a pungent compound isolated from ginger, has shown various neurobiological and anti-inflammatory effects.  In MPP(+)-treated rat mesencephalic cultures, 6-shogaol significantly increased the number of TH-IR neurons and suppressed TNF-α and NO levels. In C57/BL mice, treatment with 6-shogaol reversed MPTP-induced changes in motor coordination and bradykinesia. Furthermore, 6-shogaol reversed MPTP-induced reductions in TH-positive cell number in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and TH-IR fiber intensity in stratum (ST). Moreover, 6-shogaol significantly inhibited the MPTP-induced microglial activation and increases in the levels of TNF-α, NO, iNOS, and COX-2 in both SNpc and ST.  CONCLUSION: 6-Shogaol exerts neuroprotective effects on DA neurons in in vitro and in vivo PD models.

Recommendation:  2 capsules before bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1;

 

Melatonin: ($9.28/Annually)

Sleep disorders constitute major nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that have a substantial effect on patients’ quality of life and can be related to the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. They can also serve as preclinical markers for PD, as it is the case for rapid eye movement (REM)-associated sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although the etiology of sleep disorders in PD remains undefined, the assessment of the components of the circadian system, including melatonin secretion, could give therapeutically valuable insight on their pathophysiopathology. Melatonin is a regulator of the sleep/wake cycle and also acts as an effective antioxidant and mitochondrial function protector. A reduction in the expression of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors has been documented in the substantia nigra of PD patients. The efficacy of melatonin for preventing neuronal cell death and for ameliorating PD symptoms has been demonstrated in animal models of PD employing neurotoxins. A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is useful in treating disturbed sleep in PD, in particular RBD.
Recommendation:  1 capsules (5mg) before bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3; Research 4; Research 5; Research 6;

 

Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT): ($384.72/Annually)

Observations are supported by studies in animal models and isolated cells that show that ketone bodies, especially β-hydroxybutyrate, confer neuroprotection against diverse types of cellular injury.  Scientists were able to recover some of the function of the mitochondria.  Most important, the scientists report in the September Journal of Clinical Investigation, the high dose of the ketone prevented the mice from developing Parkinson's-like movement problems.  The Columbia researchers' findings support the idea that ketones could help people with Parkinson's disease, says Theodore B. VanItallie of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City. "There's enough evidence available now to encourage people to test the hypothesis," he says. "There's at least a reasonable possibility that these things [ketones] will work."

Recommendation:  1.5 TBS of MCT oil after breakfast, lunch, and dinner (or 2 TBS of coconut oil)

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1; Research 2; Research 3 (clinical trial pending)

 

Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT):   

Low testosterone has been shown to be a correlation, if not causal relationship, with Parkinson’s.  Testosterone replacement therapy has been shown to slow or perhaps even reverse Parkinson’s progression in animal studies. Testosterone naturally decreases with age. Most "anti-aging" doctors will recommend bringing a patient back to upper natural levels of 900-1200. This is a schedule III drug and should only be considered under the recommendation and supervision of a doctor to determine if you are a candidate. It is recommended that gels are avoided and injectables be the form of testosterone delivery.

Recommendation:  See your doctor (a doctor that understand Testosterone Therapy and is not ok with T levels of an 80 year old.

Research or Scientific Support: Research 1

See your doctor

 

Multi-Mineral Support:   ($142.40/Annually)

It is difficult to sufficiently obtain all of the minerals your body needs through regular diet. Minerals are necessary for basic health, cellular function, and PH balance. They are a cost effective means to assist with general health and should be a component of any health maintenance program.

Recommendation:  4 capsules at morning, and 4 capsules at bedtime

Research or Scientific Support: 

 

Multi-Vitamin Support:   ($71.96/Annually)

It is difficult to sufficiently obtain all of the vitamins your body needs through regular diet. Vitamins are necessary for basic health and cellular function. They are a cost effective means to assist with general health and should be a component of any health maintenance program.

Recommendation:  1 tablet at morning

Water:   

Water is absolutely necessary for every cellular function. In addition, "The Protocol" integrates many different supplements, which can be somewhat taxing on the body to process and eliminate out of the body when more is taken in than needed. Water assists the kidneys, liver, and lymph nodes in regulating toxins out of the body as well. Enough can not be said about intaking enough water.

Recommendation:  8 ounces every 2 hours

 

Labs:   

Because everyone processes supplements and nutrition differently to some degree, it is important to note side effects that you may experience and adjust accordingly. In addition, examining kidney and liver health during this protocol at least every three months is considered best practice. If you already have kidney and/or liver issues, please exercise extra caution when introducing more supplements to your daily intake. Sometimes it makes sense to add things gradually and in small amounts, to see how your body reacts.

Recommendation:  Labs once every three months for kidney and liver functions.

Lastly, consider eating healthier and minimizing exposure to toxins known to be correlated with Parkinson's disease.  In addition, "The Protocol" is not an inexpensive option.  It may be worth considering it for a few months and see if it provides results.  Many are ok with spending hundreds of dollars a month on a house or car, but not on their health.  It is all about priorities and discipline.  

Better health, better life.

Edited by jds6958

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A visual process of what this protocol looks like...

STEP 1a:

This is "The Cabinet."  I keep 3 months of inventory available at all times.  For most, 1 month of inventory would work best as delivery times in the United States are much faster.  I live in Costa Rica, so import challenges exist, hence the reason of maintaining a slightly larger inventory.

Initial Set Up Time

  • 1 Hour

Things to consider:

  • Make sure the cabinet is in a cool and dry area.  
  • When adding new inventory, be sure to keep old stock in the front and new stock in the back (these are perishable products).
  • If you have small children like I do, consider a locking mechanism.
  • Order your products online from discount retailers.  Amazon would be an example.
  • Only order products that are GMP certified

PDP-Cabinet2FINAL_zpsf8b2a73d.jpg


 

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A visual process of what this protocol looks like...

STEP 1b (OPTIONAL):

This is "The Fridge."  I keep 3 months of inventory available at all times.  For most, 1 month of inventory would work best as delivery times in the United States are much faster.  I live in Costa Rica, so import challenges exist, hence the reason of maintaining a slightly larger inventory.  

Why is this optional?

Lyposomal products do not need to be refrigerated, it is only recommended to lengthen product life.  This is not an issue if you only keep 1-2 months of inventory on hand.  Probiotics can be purchased in a shelf stable form that do not require refrigeration.  The MCT oil can be kept in your households fridge.

Initial Set Up Time

  • 5 Minutes

Things to consider:

  • Consider a small dedicated fridge
  • When adding new inventory, be sure to keep old stock in the front and new stock in the back (these are perishable products).
  • The fridge works well for lyposomal products, pro-biotics, and MCT oil
  • Order your products online from discount retailers.  Amazon would be an example.
  • Only order products that are GMP certified

    PDP-Fridge2FINAL_zpse85610d6.jpg

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A visual process of what this protocol looks like...

STEP 2:

This is "The Filling System."   Products are usually taken at different intervals of the day (Morning, Lunch, Dinner, Bedtime).
Each number represents the number of pills combined with the time of the day.  For example, a product taken one pill at morning and dinner would become 1-0-1-0.  This is written on the bottle.  When filling the pill organizers, you simply fill the pill organizer as dictated by the number system.  This keeps things simple.  When a bottle is discarded, you transfer the number system to the new bottle.  

Initial Set Up Time

  • 30 Minutes

Things to consider:

  • Keep a sharpie pen in your cabinet.  Maintaining this method only requires seconds when new product is opened.

    PDP-FillingSystem2FINAL_zps24d6aa98.jpg

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JUNE 2014 – Discontinued Selegiline.  Symptoms did not return.  Felt better than had in years.

 

NOVEMBER 2014 – Series of very stressful events, minimal exercise and reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms, including all previous symptoms and new symptoms related to a significant loss of balance, tremor occurrence and severity, dizziness, severe fatigue and other typical PD issues.  Selegiline resumed and 90% of symptoms disappeared.

 

Are you serious? "Reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms"...? ?

As for the pics...No comment....

 

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A visual process of what this protocol looks like...

STEP 3:

This is "The Filling Process."   Find a place that is comfortable, sitting or standing, that allows you to easily drop pills into the pill container.  Drop pills into the pill containers for the corresponding pill frequency and timing already on the bottle using your "Filling System."  You can fill as many weeks of pills as you would like.  More than two weeks might place your pills at risk to exposure to heat and humidity depending on your climate.  I have found two weeks to be ideal. 

Bi-Weekly Time

  • 63 Minutes

Things to consider:

  • Radio or TV helps maintain sanity during this routine.
  • Several pill containers exist.  I use "APEX LARGE" because they fit the most pills and daily containers are moveable from the weekly trays.  Because I travel and I am busy, this allows me to take the daily containers with me, but leave behind the rest of the week at home.
  • If you have children, keep the containers out of reach while filling them.  Distractions happen and you may walk away.  Be sure to find and remove any pills you drop on the floor.  As you know, with PD, this will happen.

    PDP-Fillingcontainers2FINAL_zps7d535b4a.

     

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STEP 4 (FINAL):

This is "The Ordering Process"   You will have empty bottles.  Simply order exactly what you emptied and your inventory levels will always be perfect.

The total time from Step 1 to Step 4 is 68 minutes every 2 weeks.

Bi-Weekly Time

  • 5 Minutes

Things to consider:

  • Order your products online from discount retailers.  Amazon would be an example.
  • Only order products that are GMP certified

    PDP-OrderMoreFINAL_zps8b578068.jpg

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Are you serious? "Reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms"...? ?

As for the pics...No comment....

 

Correlation does not imply causation.  I am simply noting all changes in my behavior and environment that produced symptoms.  You are isolating simply one variable and presuming I suggested that one variable caused a return of my symptoms.  I do not believe this to be the case, though logic would dictate that there is a degree of relationship in all of the variables.

 

I believe the average person is exposed to about 15,000 toxins per day.  The less your body has to work to quarantine and remove such toxins, the more resources your body has for other activity.  As you likely know, there is a direct relationship to exposure to various toxins and PD development.  

 

Did you have anything of value to add supported by data that could be used by myself or others, or did you just want to be critical?

 

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Our forum nutritionist wrote this very helpful piece of information with regards to clinoptilolite:

"Clinoptilolite: The zeolites are very common, particularly clinoptilolite; and while the Internet abounds with their use for detoxificaton, there is no research that I can find that demonstrates its safety. A single study found that “artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with...gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis.” Other studies conducted on swine, chickens, and cattle have shown mixed results with regard to growth and nutrient regention. But there is nothing related to PD or PD medicaton interactions. I speculate that it may be harmless, but without more data I would not recommend its use in PD".

 

Do YOU have any data to support your claim that reduction of clinoptilolite resulted in recurrence of your PD?

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Our forum nutritionist wrote this very helpful piece of information with regards to clinoptilolite:

 

"Clinoptilolite: The zeolites are very common, particularly clinoptilolite; and while the Internet abounds with their use for detoxificaton, there is no research that I can find that demonstrates its safety. A single study found that “artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with...gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis.” Other studies conducted on swine, chickens, and cattle have shown mixed results with regard to growth and nutrient regention. But there is nothing related to PD or PD medicaton interactions. I speculate that it may be harmless, but without more data I would not recommend its use in PD".

 

Do YOU have any data to support your claim that reduction of clinoptilolite resulted in recurrence of your PD?

The relationship of clinoptilolite is as strong or not as strong as one's belief or understanding of the relationship to toxins and Parkinson's Disease.  The ability of clinoptilolite to extract toxins from tissue is well documented and understood.

 

A clinical study on 33 men evaluated the ability of the zeolite clinoptilolite to increase heavy metal urinary excretion (Flowers 2009). To be included in the trial the men had to test positive, above a predetermined threshold, for at least four of the nine metals in a urinary test panel (ie, aluminum, antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel, and tin). The men were given either 15 drops of a clinoptilolite water suspension or placebo suspension twice daily for a maximum of 30 days. Significant increases in the urinary excretion of all 9 metals were observed in the men taking clinoptilolite as compared to placebo without a negative impact on electrolyte profiles. It has been hypothesized that the biological activity of some zeolites may be attributed to their orthosilicic acid releasing properties (ie, they are a source of orthosilicic acid) (Jurkic 2013).

 

Also: Neuroprotective Actions of Clinoptilolite

(Keep in mind that on the flip side, liquid clinoptoilolite have been proven to be of no value)

 

 

However, if one does not believe Parkinsons Disease to be caused or aggravated by toxins, and more specifically neurotoxins, then the connection between the benefits of clinoptilolite will be dismissed.  If one believes that toxins are bad for PD, then consequently, one will believe that clinoptilolite is good for PD.

 

Here is what I do know:

Series of very stressful events, minimal exercise and reduced intake of clinoptilolite produced significant PD symptoms

 

In the last month, I experienced severe environmental stress, minimal exercise and a reduction in my intake of clinoptilolite.   Some or all of those factors had a relationship to my increase in PD symptoms, of which I am now attempting to alleviate. 

 

To the degree a lack of clinoptilolite was or was not a causal mechanism is anyone's guess.  I am simply noting the correlation and variables.

 

I would rotate the clinoptiolite to on one month and off the next.  I did notice that I had more fatigue beginning to present itself at the end of an off cycle.

 

I suspect that I am particularly sensitive to toxins and that I benefit greatly in managing my toxic load.

 

Of a more particular interest is that the addition of MCT oil to the protocol seems to have solved my root issue of stress management (for the reasons outlined).  I am excited to again reduce or remove my MOA-B inhibitor in my PD management in the next couple months.  Ketones do not work for everyone, but it appears that they assist me.

 

Keep in mind, that the toxins that caused PD have likely already been processed out years ago, and left behind mitochondrial damage that I will always have.

 

The key to successful PD management is not dopamine replacement but solving for neuro-mitochondrial disfunction.

 

I was doing just fine until a situation presented itself that extended beyond the glucose centered ATP process of the mitochondria, now that I have replaced ketones as the primary source of energy, I no longer have to be concerned with that bottleneck and I can manage stress just fine.

 

I am continuing tests, and intentionally placing myself in dopamine draining social and stressful situations to observe the results.  I will be posting more over the coming weeks to share the results.

 

In the meantime, if you are willing, I would consider this book. I do not agree with all of it, but it contains some great research.

Natural Regenerative Therapies for Parkinson's Disease

 

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My thoughts exactly...

Actually I am a Lean/Six Sigma process improvement black belt.  It is in my nature to take data defined problems and try to solve for them in the most efficient/effective way possible through root cause analysis and experimentation.  I fully understand that most do not see the world and approach it the same way that I do.  It makes people uncomfortable.  

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Reverse Brain Cell Death by Growing New Mitochondria

 

Summary
Loss of mitochondrial function is both a cause and a consequence of aging, producing a vicious cycle of oxidative damage that destroys brain cells. While antioxidant intake is critical, researchers now recognize it as only one part of a comprehensive preventive strategy.
 
The nutrient PQQ, essential for many forms of life on Earth, comprises a powerful strategy to combat brain aging. PQQ protects mitochondria from cumulative oxidative damage and stimulates growth of healthy new mitochondria, thereby restoring youthful brain cell function.
 
PQQ’s effects on brain mitochondria, coupled with its other beneficial neuroprotective characteristics, make it a natural solution for preserving brain function as you age. Taken together with PQQ’s recently discovered cardioprotection and well-established immune enhancement, there is every reason to include PQQ in your supplement program.
 
 
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Actually I am a Lean/Six Sigma process improvement black belt.  It is in my nature to take data defined problems and try to solve for them in the most efficient/effective way possible through root cause analysis and experimentation.  I fully understand that most do not see the world and approach it the same way that I do.  It makes people uncomfortable.  

 

 I grew up with a guy, an accountant, who holds the same title.

 

 Black belt in systems management?              yeesh....

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 I grew up with a guy, an accountant, who holds the same title.

 

 Black belt in systems management?              yeesh....

Ugh...an accountant too?  That is even more annoying than me...LOL...maybe

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Pyrroloquinoline quinone inhibits the fibrillation of amyloid proteins (PQQ)

 

Several neurodegenerative diseases (including Parkinson's) involve the selective damage of neuron cells resulting from the accumulation of amyloid fibril formation. Considering that the formation of amyloid fibrils as well as their precursor oligomers is cytotoxic, the agents that prevent the formation of oligomers and/or fibrils might allow the development of a novel therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) inhibits the amyloid fibril formation of the amyloid proteins, amyloid β (1–42) and mouse prion protein. The fibril formation of mouse prion protein in the presence of PQQ was dramatically prevented. Similarly, the fibril formation of amyloid β (1–42) also decreased. With further advanced pharmacological approaches, PQQ may become a leading anti-neurodegenerative compound in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

 

 



 

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How long have you been taking Seleguline?

 

  Sorry for the delayed response, I missed this post.

 

 About 5 or 6 years....

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