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malexander

Balance

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I used to be quite proud of my balance.  A few years ago, I excelled at various yoga poses supported by one leg.  Now, I can do these poses only with great difficulty (if at all).  I have not yet fallen, but I have come close to falling several times while walking or upon standing with two feet.  I do not experience vertigo.  I was tested for peripheral neuropathy, and proprioception was found normal on both feet.   I understand that Proprioception is not normally affected by PD, so I wonder why balance is such an issue with PD.  

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Balance is affected by disease progression in PD, however physical therapy and also potentially medication optimization can be helpful.

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Yes, I understand that PD affects balance.  What I am wondering (in part to inform my physical therapy) is why.  If it is not via proprioception or vestibular function, what is the mechanism.  If it is a deficit in the CNS, do we understand any more about the mechanism.

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We believe it is a complex neurodegeneration in multiple brain circuits including brainstem, thalamus, and even areas of cortex.  Many areas can affect gait and balance.

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