Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
Sign in to follow this  
malexander

Pesticides and PD

Recommended Posts

How solid is the evidence for exposure to pesticides (and other agricultural chemicals) being a risk factor for PD.  I am aware of some of the studies by Dr. Ritz at UCLA that suggest that several agents, each increase the susceptibility to PD slightly when being the sole exposure.  Yet when combined with each other or with certain genetic factor, they can increase the risk of PD substantially. I have seen reports of this relationship in Scientific American, as well as other resources.

 

 ​I am responsible for arranging speakers for a large support group.  We recently had a speaker who stirred up some controversy by saying this is a myth resulting from self-reporting and poor epidemiology.  What can you tell us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not a myth.  Multiple studies now show a clear relationship with some pesticides and later development of Parkinson's disease (particularly with no family history).  I review them in the book Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life.  Not a myth!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much later (at the least, approx.) would it take to start showing signs of PD after exposure?

 

How intense would exposure have to be? Exposed everyday for years, or just a few times a year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one knows the answer to question 1.

 

Carlie Tanner at UCSF has been working on data to partially answer question 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my case, I have strongly suspected agricultural chemicals caused my PD.  As a professional gardener on large estates, I sprayed chemicals to control various diseases and insect problems on plants and weed control.  I did this on an almost daily basis for about 7 out of 12 months per year from 1993 to 2000.  Ironically, I was an organic gardener at my own home so my time using these chemicals was confined to my employment as a gardener.  Constipation was my earliest symptom and was present before 2000.  Fatigue, stiffness and slowness started around 2008 and I was diagnosed in 2011.  I had been in near perfect health my entire life, no family history of PD, no long-term prescription drug use.  Of course, I have no way of knowing for sure if my theory is correct but I thought it was relevant to this discussion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is definitely relevant.  We are very concerned that pesticide exposure may cause or unmask Parkinson's disease.  There is a lot of great research ongoing in this area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Constipation and loss of smell can both be early pre-clinical signs of Parkinson's disease.

 

Pesticides are considered by many experts as a "second hit."  The exposure sets off the Parkinson's disease.  Pesticides do not likely cause and may not likely be involved in every case.  Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×