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I had to go to the ER Monday night. It was time to take another dose of C/L, but they said they would take care of that (never got PD medication).  Anyway, they gave me a shot of morphine for pain.  I knew I was wearing off and should be worse, but when I got up to go the bathroom, I was moving very smoothly and easily.  I also felt pretty alert.  Yes, there was a little euphoria (more like relaxed), but I certainly wasn't sluggish or anything.

 

I find this all pretty odd, but maybe it is PD thing. Or is it something else? 

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I think what you experienced was a rapid increase in dopamine production. Opiates will do that. I sometimes take Tramadol for my pain and it really knocks back the PD symptoms. The bummer is, it's only temporary.

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I think what you experienced was a rapid increase in dopamine production. Opiates will do that. I sometimes take Tramadol for my pain and it really knocks back the PD symptoms. The bummer is, it's only temporary.

 

Don't know which other meds you are on, but if you take an MAO-B Inhibitor (e.g. Azilect) there is potential for a fatal interaction (hypertensive crisis) with Tramadol.

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 The bummer is, it's only temporary.

Of course, sinemet is also only temporary. As is Advil, chemotherapy, or alcohol.

I notice when I drink beer I feel better, as alcohol is a muscle relaxer.

I feel better (PD-wise) when I take a hydrocodone for my back pain.

Curiously, I notice no change in pain level when I take my 1-1/2 tabs of sinemet

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Murrypd2 I am glad you have brought up the topic. I am just going to therapy for my shoulder. If it doesn,t recoup right I think they may try to fix it. Been wondering what happenes with morphine? Alcohol effects me the same as music man. But I drink very little. (balance issue) I also get rigid and have spasms when sinemet wears off. I hope others chime in on operation experiences. thanks tom

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I have some pain issues not related to PD, and I find that MS Contin (morphine) at 15mgs works quite well.... with no problems with my PD meds..... of course I only use as needed..... as I do not want to get hooked on the crap.....and that, makes my PCP quite happy, as I say "no" to more refills more times than yes.......

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Don't know which other meds you are on, but if you take an MAO-B Inhibitor (e.g. Azilect) there is potential for a fatal interaction (hypertensive crisis) with Tramadol.

 

 

I rarely take tramadol anymore. No inhibitors. I just quit Sinemet too. I get my l-dopa through mucuna. I am on the Hinz/Stein protocol and I must say that I am feeling much better than with Sinemet. The L-dopa from munuca seems to be more effective and lasts longer. Pain has always been my biggest issue. With sinemet, I had a lot of pain. I now have much less. My mood is better. I have a positive outlook on life. Anxiety is gone, rigidity is less, etc.

 

Another thing I would recommend if you are able is cannabis. It works for most of our PD symptoms. It's not a cure, PWP still need l-dopa. I found before I was diagnosed I was "relaxing" with a few drinks a night. Alcohol does relieve things albeit with negative long term consequences. I now puff a bit of cannabis and it works far better and I do not believe there are negatives with it. I use a high amount of CBD, which is not psychoactive. It does not act on the central nervous system like opiates and is not addictive.

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Thanks for the replies.  I did pain management for years before knowing about PD.  This also explains why I preferred tramadol for pain and why I thought I felt better overall. 

 

Sinemet does help me loosen up, but by the end of the day my neck is pretty stiff; which could be work stress.

 

I came to a harsh realization of how closely stress and PD feed off each other.  A guy rear-ended me yesterday. Turns out he is uninsured.  When dealing with him and the insurance, my hands are getting shaky.  After all that is over, I start to drive home and my left foot cramps up hard to the point I can't drive.  It used to curl up temporarily all the time before the proper treatment, but it has been months since that has occurred and it never got this persistent.  I figured it was the PD "attacking" from the heightened stress.

 

Does anyone recommend a good ant-anxiety med or therapy?  Morphine seemed great, but I assume I can't go driving around with that.  I am learning to take deep breaths and calm myself.  I didn't used to get worked up so easily.

Edited by MurrayPD2

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Murry stress makes my function way worse as well. To tell you the truth I think getting in a car accident and dealing with insurance is stressful for anyone. The best way for me is I always look at the whole picture.(Constipation and Pain meds cause me more stress) Did anyone get injured, the car can be fixed, You've done everything neccessary on your end to resolve the issue. Is it  going to change things by dwelling on negatives. Then I go on a walk and observe all the nice things around me. I had three daughters that all had car recks on my ins. Before I found out I had PD I lost parts of three fingers right had, Have three vertibres fused in my neck,have broke my back before, almost died from a staph infection,and blood clots. I went for many walks in my life. I found out that it all works out. One day you look back at it all and realize that's life. And that was yesterday. I know the way you feel. It all works out.

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Thanks Omaha.  three fingers?  I am  curious about that story.  C5-C7 are fused in my neck, but I feel much better with the PD meds! 

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Three fingers 30 ton brake press. Not hydralic. Old Chicago Kind with a slip clutch. A south vietnamese politcal assylum imagrant step on the pedal at the wrong time while we were lining up a 4 by 8 sheet of plate steel. We Kinda had a language problem. Those things happen. Guys told me a could of won the high jump in track after it happened. I left the leather glove on so I didn't see the damage to the hand. I was really quit calm. Hurt like hell at first. But went totally numb shortly after. I was a jack of all trades. AND DEFINATLY A MASTER OF NON. I also have c5 to c7 hard to turn your head. Up and down not so bad. 

Edited by OMAHA TOM

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Murry maybe the fact we had a little rigidity makes us more prone to injuries like the neck,back, shoulders,muscle strains and so on once we got it. but  I played allots of contact sports football, amature boxing(smokers),Baseball if the catcher blocked the plate i would not think twice to put the shoulder down and try to take him out. Getting hit in the head is not a good thing. Maybe if I would of used mine in school I could probably spell. But can't change it now. But then again the sports were fun at the time.

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Three fingers 30 ton brake press. Not hydralic. Old Chicago Kind with a slip clutch. A south vietnamese politcal assylum imagrant step on the pedal at the wrong time while we were lining up a 4 by 8 sheet of plate steel. We Kinda had a language problem. Those things happen. Guys told me a could of won the high jump in track after it happened. I left the leather glove on so I didn't see the damage to the hand. I was really quit calm. Hurt like hell at first. But went totally numb shortly after. I was a jack of all trades. AND DEFINATLY A MASTER OF NON. I also have c5 to c7 hard to turn your head. Up and down not so bad. 

thanks for sharing...  I hope you got worker's comp for the hand.

 

As for the neck, at least I can twist around now.  the doctor actually wanted to do a less invasive technique, but the insurance would only pay for the more radical approach.  go figure

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