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Waywrd1

Milk and PD

8 posts in this topic

When I have cows milk, usually in cereal, it's not too bad.  But if I have a glass of it, I'm off almost all day.  I might as well not bother taking my sinemet...  I know the protein interacts on the same neuropathways, but is there something else going on specific to Milk?  My reaction to yogurt (even greek) or cheese is not nearly as bad.  Has anyone had better luck with almond milk?

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You are not alone, not at all. It's the "milk effect" on levodopa. Cow's milk is particularly rich in the large neutral amino acids. These are the aminos that compete with levodopa for absorption from the intestine. Milk has a higher content of these aminos that most other protein foods, and many people experience exactly the results you describe.

 

In cheesemaking, the whey is drawn off, taking some of these aminos with it. In Greek yogurt, some of the whey is also drawn off, lowering the aminos.

 

Almond milk is not related in any way to cow's milk, and many folks use it (or soy or rice milk substitute) in place of cow's milk. These are much lower in protein, so you may need to make up your protein intake from other sources -- cooked dried beans, nuts and seeds, chia seeds, fish and other protein-rich foods.

 

If this did not completely answer your question, let me know.

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Question on absorption...

The interesting stuff that's been coming out about the lack of a diverse biome inside PwP's gut has led me to feed my husband 1 youghurt a day.  We alternate between Greek, regular yoghurt and Activa, as all have  different cultures.  It doesn't seem to have interfered with the C/L absorption, but what are your thoughts?  I am always inclined to go 'natural' in trace matters and go to the source rather than purchase probiotic pills that we actually have no clear idea on the provence.  Is the C/L a serious concern with one container (small) of yoghurt a day if no effect is discerned?

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If he is not sensitive to milk protein, I would not change a thing. You will know if a type of protein is a concern, because the levodopa will not take effect, and his PD symptoms will remain uncontrolled. And alternating the brands should be good too, for the variety of organisms.

 

I would agree that yogurt is a better source of probiotics than pills, as you don't know that the pills contain the amount of bacteria stated, nor, in some cases, if the bacteria are still alive. If you care to try making your own kefir, that has a broader spectrum of probiotic organisms than yogurt. You can make kefir from milk, or from a water-sugar solution, in fact I understand it can be made from coconut milk and other liquids.

 

And, it's worth mentioning other types of fermented foods. If he is not taking Azilect, sauerkraut, kimchee, miso, or other fermented vegetables can also add to the variety. I completely agree that restoring the health of the gut is or should be a priority for those with PD.

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Thanks for the reply.  So far he is not sensitive to milk proteins, and I stuff all sorts of weird things into him looking for trace natural elements.  Your recipes always give me ideas, and I always check your posts.  I found that he enjoys sauerkraut more than kelp.....

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That's great that he isn't sensitive to milk protein, may it always stay that way. And sauerkraut or other fermented foods will help maintain a healthy microbe population in the gut.

 

For trace minerals, raw nuts are excellent, they are tiny warehouses of hard-to-find trace minerals, as well as natural vitamin E. Raw is best, because cooking destroys most of the vitamin E; but even then, the minerals will still be present. Raw almonds, walnuts, pecans, Brazil nuts, and filberts are all wonderful. If he likes them, offer a mixture of 2-3 tablespoons daily. They are rich in nourishing fats, protein, and complex carbohydrates, as well as vitamins and trace minerals.

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Is the the amino acid in milk that causes the conflict, also present in high amounts if the milk is freeze dried?  Milk powder is in everything!!

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Yes, milk that has been freeze-dried contains everything but the water content of the milk. So all the amino acids that compete with levodopa for absorption are still present. Often, though, there isn't very much milk powder in a product, so it may not always be enough to affect absorption.

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