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radmatty

Another New Guy

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I am newly diagnosed with PD at age 58. I just had my first visit with a neurologist about four weeks ago. Time with the doctor was about 10 minutes. He asked me to walk around the room, touch my nose with my eyes closed and tested my grip in my left and right hands. I left his office with a prescription for Mirapex. Four weeks of a gradually increasing dose has left me feeling much better.

 

I first knew something was wrong with my health in 2009. I was taking a welding class at a local tech college. I was learning a process that requires a very steady hand and excellent coordination. I noticed that I had the slightest tremor in my right hand, Something that would have been unnoticeable under normal circumstances. In a few months, I also noticed that my right arm felt uncomfortable while walking. The tremor increased gradually spreading to my right leg by 2011. By 2014, I ceased to be able to write due to a worsening of the tremor. I hadn't had any health insurance since 2009 so I was only seeing a primary care physician on a cash basis. He prescribed Primadone, which helped a little bit. In late fall of 2015, my health was taking a turn for the worse when my mother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. I became her primary caregiver. By the time she passed away, in January 2016, I was a wreck. I had lost a lot of weight, to the point of being emaciated and was so weak I could barely dress. Just at this time I got insurance again. Getting off the Primadone and onto Mirapex seems to have made a big difference. I've also had some help from a gastroenterologist with some digestive complaints. I'm regaining health. I am able to work part-time and to walk the dog a reasonable distance. And the best of all, I'm feeling fired up to do battle with PD. 
Edited by radmatty

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Welcome, radmatty. You will find lots of experience, strength, and hope in these pages. It helps to remember that PD is different in each individual. Try not to be overwhelmed by all the different symptoms because it is quite likely that you won't have the symptoms that PD can create. I'm glad you finally have seen a neurologist. For best results, many of us see a Movement Disorders Specialist (MDS). This is a specialized neurologist who has specific training and experience in PD, MS, and ALS.

 

Dianne

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Hi Radmatty,  Sweet dog!  Sounds like you are managing well under the circumstances.  This forum has been a great resource for me as there is never enough time to get all my questions answered at my doctor appts.  Lots of caring people here for support if that is what you need.  Do you have access to a Movement Disorder Specialist in your area?  I mention it only because after consulting both early on, the MDS was much more familiar with PD (she said that 80% of her patients have Parkinson's).  Best wishes and keep us posted.  Gardener

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Radmatty welcome your situation sounds very simular to mine. It is that little loss of function through time. You adapt until there is no adapting. The main thing now is additude that you can again. (EXcept things like spelling in my case never could)But you sure sound like you are on the mend. Positive thinker, no pore me, can't, or what will it be like next year. This is a good place to get some imput on what others do about those little symptoms that come up.

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Radmatty,

 

Welcome to our little corner of the web.   I'm currently working with our latest four legged family member on a few things to assist me. She is great, and pretty much has passed 9/14 criteria for service dog work.  Need to work on "not grabbing food that falls on the floor, but for me that is a good service dog function!".   Thankfully ignores cats and small yappy dogs. :)  

 

 

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Edited by TexasTom
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I am scheduled to see a movement disorders specialist in mid-August. I will be seen at Froedtert Hospital & the Medical College of Wisconsin's Neurosciences Specialty Clinic in the Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Program.

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Just beware of the POSSIBLE compulsive side effects of the Mirapex....gambling, sex, shopping, etc. If you notice anything changing along those lines, get help fast!

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Just beware of the POSSIBLE compulsive side effects of the Mirapex....gambling, sex, shopping, etc. If you notice anything changing along those lines, get help fast!

I've only noticed one thing along those lines. After avoiding fast food for at least 15 years, I suddenly have a great craving for double bacon cheeseburgers, Whoppers, fries, and milkshakes. This is not a good thing because I have intolerances or sensitivities to grains and dairy. Today I am a basket case from having eaten such food for several days. And the Mirapex doesn't seem to be working at all.

 

Anybody else have food or environmental sensitivities along with their PD?

Edited by radmatty

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Wow fast food we have Grand children. My kids have them hooked on it. I tried the old fashioned this what is on your plate. Well I now eat it when they come over. I think the fast food is addictive without meds. I am somewhat lucky with I have diminished smell and taste. Everything is new right now with meds for you. What I found helps is go for a short walk, work on a project, hobby, something that is  inplace of unhealthy habits.

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The nutrition forum was recently shut down, why we don't know. However, the excellent nutritionist who was our source can be found on Facebook at: Parkinson's-chew on this.

 

Many of us are protein sensitive- the amino acids in protein use the same pathways as dopamine, and they're larger in size so they pump the dopamine we need off the path.  Some of us are also milk sensitve- with anything where the whey is drawn off being somewhat better.  For example, I cannot have milk, ice cream, etc.  I can have small quantities of cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, yogurt (although I'm looking for a non-dairy yogurt which isn't disgustingly sweet.)

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