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Bob49PC    1

I have had DBS for 4+ years, and in the last 16-18 months have picked up my musical instrumetns (mostly keyboards and guitar) with the goal of restoring lost coordination of fingering skills. This, plus singing with a group of Parkinson's People, has enabled me to reduce symptoms and improve cognitive skills and mood.

I find that the combination of DBS programming, diet, exercise (including Dance for Parkinson's), reduction of pain through surgery, and creative musical expression have all contributed to the whole picture, which is that I feel better than I did this time last year. I have recently read or heard of information that dance as an exercise for Parkinson's provides longer lasting symptom relief than other forms of exercise. Since performing and creating music should theoretically stimulate and challenge the brain more than simply moving to music, one might hypothesize that the beneficial effects of music might be even greater than those of dance or exercise. 

Questions are:

  1. Any other folks with PD using music to lift depression, restore energy, etc.? What level of skill had you originally attained and where are you now? More importantly, what effects have the practice of music  had on your Quality of Life and disease symptoms? What other treatments are you taking, (not limited to prescription medications or DBS programming?)
  2. More of a medical research question: What is the current state of research on the use of music, either as a preventive, ameliorative, or restorative trreatment for the physical symptoms or emotional and psychological consequences of Parkinson's Disease (pre and post diagnosis) and other conditions that are related to dopamine deficiient and other neuro-transmitter deficient brains? (depression, bipolar, essential tremor, etc.)
  3. It may be important that my DBS implants (bilateral) were done shortly after medical specialists were able to observe sufficient criteria to be able to make the diagnosis of Parkinson's, or that I had several of the "warning signs" from about 16 - 17 years of age, and prior to the PD diagnosis had been treated for depression, RLS, RBD sleep disorder, essential tremor, and other conditions.

Anyone know of any research being conducted in this area?

 

Anyone care to add their experiences or comment? Does any of this resonate or "strike a chord" with you?

Thanks!

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Beau's Mom    1,060

I attended a PD seminar last month where several therapies, including music, boxing, dance and laughter were presented. We all got to participate in each group, and I was quite energized by the experience. I couldn't carry a tune in a bucket with a lid on it, but I sure enjoyed moving to the music even from a seated position. It's wonderful you've found this outlet.

 

Dianne

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stump    463

I've got a face for radio and a voice for print.   8)

 

However, I've been thinking of trying to learn the violin while I can still use my left hand well enough.  Eventually I won't be able to control it well enough to play well.  Though the tremors would make the vibrato easier...

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hans55    36

I played guitar, bass and flutes since I was a kid (57 now). The first sign that something was off was my diminishing playing ability. At this moment I can do a fraction of what I could do in the past, but playing music still gives me rewards in many ways. I dont use meds by the way. If I would, perhaps motor skills/ playing would improve......

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MusicMan    771

I play guitar every day...sometimes just a song, sometimes many. My dexterity is somewhat diminished, and my vocals suck, but I'll do it as long as I am able

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om(pd)om    40

music and PD, god yes.

music as the soul's irrepressible expression of life and love, joy and sadness.

making music as one way of asserting (to my small, battered self most of all): i am still here, i am still alive, still breathing, still able to feel every human emotion i have ever felt, still able to lose myself in the joyful vibration of drum, voice, and guitar.

at the end of a day like today, i can choose to reflect on the hours i felt wonderful, playing electric and acoustic guitar, or on the hours i felt trapped in the "off" symptoms, having difficulty shuffling my cramping legs and feet while waiting for the meds to put me back "on". my choice, just as it's my choice whether to stay in the present moment, or worry about an imagined future complete with more disability, such as freezing. my choice.  

i choose to be here now. with my breath, with my loved ones, with music.

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Parkinsons disease and music are related .If we are listening the music daily we can reduce our disease.Music is the magic of medicine.If we love music then no need other medicine and tips.Many of the doctors telling try to listen when you are upset or stressed then that time we can reduce our stress.Now i am planning to complete my assignment work with the help of custom essay writing service and internet.I hope i can easily complete my work because I am also listening the music when i am stressed.If you have new tips and ideas please share with me.

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New normal    1,275

Have you ever been to a party where there are slobby drunks in one corner.....prudish onlookers in the other...and everyone in between? Some of the best parties let everyone do their own thing.....express their political views....dress in their culture.....or be alone in their thoughts....many feel enough trust in strangers to express their deepest thoughts...because they feel safety in anonymity.

 

Threads aren't killed....threads expand with each post...and may indeed link up with another who needed to hear a specific message.

 

Some of us are able to relish in the moment...for which I am grateful. I hope we all continue our goals, hobbies, exercise, and positive thinking. Forever.

 

I lived with five children who excelled in music...in all genres ...I love music. I miss the kaleidoscope of sound merging together. That's my gig. I can only listen.

 

The one thing we all have in common is none of know what the other is experiencing.......

 

NN

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Discovery    387

I relish in every moment...thank you very much!!

 

I also love humour...

 

MM has his way of expression....I find it funny...

 

So what does that make me..the sloppy drunk or the prudish onlooker...

 

I'll tell you who I am. I'm the one who hangs out in the kitchen with the fun gang!!

 

D

Edited by Discovery
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miracleseeker    675

 

 

So what does that make me..the sloppy drunk or the prudish onlooker...

 

 

I read this without my glasses and thought it said prudish hooker. Is there such a thing?  :-P

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Back to music --

My first hint that something was wrong with my coordination came when I was playing the piano.  I thought it was lack of practice and went back to classic piano exercises.  No improvement.  That led me to suspect the problem was neurological rather than simply muscular.  It was two or three years before I started on medication.  But, hans55, you are right:  meds can restore your abilities.  When on all my meds, if I hit just the right time, I still have wonderful moments of feeling like my old self at the keyboard.  Most of the time my fingering is fine, but interpretation or expression is limited.  But my grand piano is still one of my most treasured possessions, and I enjoy making music, even when it is mediocre.

J

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wifeofPWPD    114

I read this without my glasses and thought it said prudish hooker. Is there such a thing?  :-P

Maybe there is among other hookers.

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Seward    0

I'm having trouble with instruments.  I can play drums for a minute or two, then I miss a stroke.  Similarly, I can't do downstrokes on the electric guitar.

Any suggestions?

hans

 

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Hi, Seward --

I must first confess ignorance of playing drum and guitar.  Therefore, I cannot offer suggestions on technique.  When I am at the piano and experience lack of coordination, when my fingers don't do what my brain is telling them to do, I know my medication is not in full effect.  Sometimes I just have to take a break and try later.  I know that is not very helpful, but the only other action I take is to try rigidly timed finger exercises and see if I can increase muscular control.  Usually that has a positive result, though I never expect perfection.

J

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Linda Garren    750

Hi, Muff.  Dr Pantelyat (in the videos above) is my MDS.  He's a phenomenal doctor and human being, humble and down-to-earth, with an ever-present smile and boundless energy and enthusiasm.  I've been so grateful to be under his care.

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BillBRNC    27

I play the banjo, not as well as I used to, but well enough. And sing, I do too. Mostly old time mountain music, but also a lot of more modern stuff through the 1960's. The thing about playing the banjo is that most people can even tell when I mess up something, so that's nice. It is also easier to play a banjo than a guitar, as it is tuned to an open G. I used to play the guitar, but I sold mine and have played the banjo for a good number of years now. As I progress through my DLB and Parkinson stuff, I hope I can continue playing up to close to the end. I like it. It soothes the soul. I love to play in minor keys, don't know why. I used to play in bars and local jams, but I had to stop due to missing too much stuff, and those guys do notice, and I couldn't remember words to songs anymore, and I don't like to use paper things to read from. Same for iPad's and such. I just plug along now, but folks still seem to enjoy listening. And if they don't, I don't care because I enjoy playing and singing by myself as much as anything. For those who play, keep on playing. For those who don't, take up an easy instrument that you like, then start playing with other people as quickly as you can, as that is the best way to learn and advance. All you really need to know to start is three chords on whatever instrument you are playing, or the individual notes for the same three chords. Just take off. Happy picking. 

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francesblo    3

There has been some research, I believe by physical therapists, about the use of music to improve gait.  I was very interested because my gait is awful.  Some PD patients were able to improve their gait by listening to music and/or music + metronome emphasizing beat. Apparently the patients increased stride length and improved stride.  When I can I listen to music when I walk, since this often encourages me to walk faster(if I select the right music); I have a separate Pandora channel on my cell phone with tempo that forces me to walk a bit faster.   Have also worked with PT to improve my stride.  Both seem to have helped.

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LAD    215
On 9/4/2017 at 3:05 PM, francesblo said:

There has been some research, I believe by physical therapists, about the use of music to improve gait.  I was very interested because my gait is awful.  Some PD patients were able to improve their gait by listening to music and/or music + metronome emphasizing beat. Apparently the patients increased stride length and improved stride.  When I can I listen to music when I walk, since this often encourages me to walk faster(if I select the right music); I have a separate Pandora channel on my cell phone with tempo that forces me to walk a bit faster.   Have also worked with PT to improve my stride.  Both seem to have helped.

Music definitely helps with gait & freezing. 

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