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Didi

Extreme Anxiety

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So many commonalities. Difficulty or no sleep. Depression. Anxiety. Feeling claustrophobic. Spread this out sporadically over 15 years and I can relate as so many of us do. Yet I wasn't officially diagnosed with PD almost 2 years ago. I forget. Also another symptom of PD. :)

 

I do take klonopin/clonazapam for anxiety. Definitely helps. Seems like a bit of a roller coaster at times. You finally level out when you get the correct level and combination of meds and exercise. You do need to be your own advocate and be honest with the docs.

 

There are psychiatrists that specialize in PD. The one I met with, to get a better handle on anxiety and depression issues, stated his experience has been finding out that PWP more often have issues with anxiety than depression.

 

Claustrophobia combined with anxiety? I guess only the experts can explain the reasons. All I know is I could do all the positive self-talk as possible and it wouldn't be enough…….at least not until combined with medication.

 

There is Hope. Things will get better.

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In my case I totally agree with him there are days I can't stand the fact that PD is changing me ,I think most people struggle with a bit of why me sometimes . And a person that hasn't needed to see a Dr in 30 years may be struggling with the acceptance portion of PD . I just turned 52 and since the nice weather started and I've been able to get out and do things ,I get very agitated at times with the loss of my ability to do the things I used to do .Which in turn builds into anxiety . so far I've been able to control it without additional meds. But it can be very frustrating to go from 100 miles an hour all the time to half that . So  I think it is possible your husband may be fighting an inner battle with himself .Over the past few years I haven't told my wife everything because I don't want her to worry .She goes to most of my appointments with me . But when I seen the Phsyc Dr  she was not with so I was more honest than If she was in the room . A stubborn man thing I know but she doesn't need to worry anymore than she already does .I also have sleep issues ,I am up 6-7 times a night . which in turn helps boost the daytime fatigue factor .

 

     Dan

Edited by Hunter Dan

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Hi Hunter

You younger guys have it alot worse than the rest of us.I don't know how I would have handled a DX twenty years earlier.

One thing though is about PD or any other organic illness  nothing we did  brought it on.This is comforting because it releases any regret we might have had.A secure thought is progression is a lot slower with the younger onset group.

You mentioned getting up alot at night.I use to have the same problem .Using a CPAC for my sleep apnea has greatly reduced.many times now I sleep without having to get up..There are other alternatives for the machine.For me I got lose about thirty pounds,LOL

I wake up everyday like a bird chirping away,maybe because my mind at least has rested thanks to my friend Dr.Low

Hey i picked up my new 20 gauge I won in a legion raffle for hunting this fall,a lot lighter and less recoil than the old 12

Good hunting

john

Edited by johnnys

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Didi

I am sorry you and DH (dear husband) are going through this.  Every response you have been given is genuine and true.

I can only add in my experience psychiatrists are devoted soley to brain chemistry.  After your initial visit, they prescribe medication after a 15 minute assessment  based on self/spouse observation.  I knew at PD onset eventually brain chemistry would be an issue.  I searched carefully for a psychiatrist who was conservative in prescribing, experienced enough to use time tested rx, and who had a thorough understanding of interactions among drugs. It is vital he works carefully with your MDS. Both DH and I have been successful with minimal  rx to control PD depression /anxiety.

Didi, as you have seen by responses, DH's behaviour is common to many of us.  Each is different. You will find an answer. Also post to care giver forum as well as here.   Collectively, their wisdom is immeasurable.... second only to their compassion.  They can help you through this.

We all know the experience of no...or incorrect ...medication.  Most of us also know how quickly things normalize with the correct medication.  You WILL find an answer.  Be patient...especially with yourself.  In our world, no one is perfect.  Be kind to yourself.

NN

On a side note: Hunter Dan...you described PWP's emotional roller coaster better than anyone. It gave me comfort to know others  feel the same....and we are not alone.  As Beau's Mom says...daily we live with a degree of grief as we recognize a bit of us leaving..but we must exchange grief with acceptance...which it sounds like what you do.  That balance line...betwee grief and acceptance ...shifts daily.   Stay strong, Dan...you...and we .....can do this.

Quiet still...you speak, I listen. Definitely, on point as usual.

John:  its all about Dr Low ?

Love the ones you love.

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I now take 30mg of mirtazapine and 60 mg of Cymbalta.  I used to take 20 mg of clorazepate (since about 10 years) and from time to time lorazepam when it got really bad.  I have since stopped all benzodiazepines as they are addictive and cause memory loss after the age of 60.  Much better now and I realise that the lorazepam took me up immediately and down after about 3 hours.  The clorazepate was much more stable (50 hours half life, so no roller coaster effects) but I had to stop that as well.  I seem to be OK with the mirtazapine and cymbalta yet I still wish I could function without them.  The PD is new (2 months) and it hasn't really sunk in yet, hopefully I'll be OK.  

 

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To quell anxiety in unsafe situations, learning good self-defense techniques is important for situations you may find yourself in like this one.   (I laughed and laughed and laughed at how effectively the woman took care of what was happening.)     https://rumble.com/embed/vfkg2/

Muffet, I know very well the kind of anxiety you experience.  I learned that very often a situation that causes us anxiety is related to something completely apart from the situation in which the anxiety arises.  I don't know of you have considered seeing a therapist, but I highly recommend it, after having gone through debilitating anxiety in certain situations, myself.  My therapist (a social worker) helped me understand a lot about this, and with the help of Xanax at first, I did what she suggested I do, which was to go ahead on through situations that cause the anxiety.  Through a really funny scenario she took me through she helped me understand that the situation would not kill me, and that by facing it by going through it was the best thing to do.  I'm Parkie-brain addled this morning, so I hope I'm relaying this information clearly.  If not, just let me know.

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1 hour ago, Linda Garren said:

To quell anxiety in unsafe situations, learning good self-defense techniques is important for situations you may find yourself in like this one.   (I laughed and laughed and laughed at how effectively the woman took care of what was happening.)     https://rumble.com/embed/vfkg2/

Muffet, I know very well the kind of anxiety you experience.  I learned that very often a situation that causes us anxiety is related to something completely apart from the situation in which the anxiety arises.  I don't know of you have considered seeing a therapist, but I highly recommend it, after having gone through debilitating anxiety in certain situations, myself.  My therapist (a social worker) helped me understand a lot about this, and with the help of Xanax at first, I did what she suggested I do, which was to go ahead on through situations that cause the anxiety.  Through a really funny scenario she took me through she helped me understand that the situation would not kill me, and that by facing it by going through it was the best thing to do.  I'm Parkie-brain addled this morning, so I hope I'm relaying this information clearly.  If not, just let me know.

I did. My therapist was great.... I've got breathing techniques etc.... I know what's happening and my reaction is the physical shaking. It's bizarre. I just get through it. I know it goes away. 

 

LAD

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Not sure where you are located but Hopkins has some clinical trials with PD & anxiety. You can find info on MJ Fox Foundation trial finder. 

 

LAD

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