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MurrayPD2

For those of you working...

55 posts in this topic

I am curious if your career or goals in your job has changed much. 

 

For instance, I have always been pretty assertive and looking for the next big step.  Now, I am realizing I don't think a lot of pressure or stress is worth it with a demonstrated pattern of PD getting worse at stressful moments or situations.  So, I am more content that I don't HAVE to be so hard on myself with achieving big accomplishments.  I just don't think it is worth my health and I should be content where I am today and continue to value my work while focusing more on family.

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I agree, I too have always wanted to get to the next step so to speak. I have often struggled with accepting that I may not be able to work until normal retirement age. Recently I have tried to focus more on ACHIEVING realistic short term goals. The stress is definitely a factor. The term I use with my boss is "this is only work, it's not as bad as real life." He knows briefly of my condition due to FMLA, but the realist in me finds it harder and harder to care about career achievements. The whole bucket list thing is starting to make a lot more sense to me than continuing to contribute to this whole capitalist/consumer nonsense.

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Speaking as a CG of someone with PD/dementia  I can tell you that being at work for me  is peanuts compare to going home to take care of my mom.  Whenever I see someone at work is having a bad day I try to lighten up the mood and tell them I would gladly trade places with them.  They go home to relax and chill while my 2nd job without pay begins.

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I started working towards my MBA a few months before the first apparent symptoms started, and was diagnosed early during my 5th academic quarter (out of 8 ) for the program, so just over half way.  Being an engineer, I didn't get the MBA to just keep doing what I'd been doing.  I'd have gotten an engineering masters if I wanted to stay that course, but move up in salary grade (and hence pay).  I am still actively seeking a move up into the executive track.  I'm well aware of the pressures I'll be under during and after that move.  PD may rob me of that capability to handle that pressure, or it may not.  If it does, then at least I'll go down swinging rather than passively watch the ball sail over the plate.  If that happens then I will know it wasn't lack of effort that did me in.  In the mean time I'm doing all I can to live my life as much as possible as though I don't have PD.  I have not yet altered any life goal.  But I'm also sure as heck not going to cancel my disability insurance.  

Edited by stump
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I started working towards my MBA a few months before the first apparent symptoms started, and was diagnosed early during my 5th academic quarter (out of 8) for the program, so just over half way.  Being an engineer, I didn't get the MBA to just keep doing what I'd been doing.  I'd have gotten an engineering masters if I wanted to stay that course, but move up in salary grade (and hence pay).  I am still actively seeking a move up into the executive track.  I'm well aware of the pressures I'll be under during and after that move.  PD may rob me of that capability to handle that pressure, or it may not.  If it does, then at least I'll go down swinging rather than passively watch the ball sail over the plate.  If that happens then I will know it wasn't lack of effort that did me in.  In the mean time I'm doing all I can to live my life as much as possible as though I don't have PD.  I have not yet altered any life goal.  But I'm also sure as heck not going to cancel my disability insurance.  

 

 

Stump !

 

Congratulations for your courage and determination. That’s the way to go ! I too, was diagnosed very early (34). And I did not let Parkinson’s ruin my career life. I must admit though as time went by, I sort of took a back seat and kept my job at a distance.  That did not worsen my results, on the contrary, this distance favored weighed  and carefully thought-out decisions. I did not give up on my life goal either and had my first and only child at 40 (6 years after diagnosis).  He is now 23 and just had his Master’s in history from the University of Bordeaux.  Not that I am bragging (although I must admit I am very proud of him) but I want to stress you can lead a normal life and have children who enjoy a normal life as well). We must  recognize though that each case is different and there is no general rule.

Take care,

Mireille

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Speaking as a CG of someone with PD/dementia  I can tell you that being at work for me  is peanuts compare to going home to take care of my mom.  Whenever I see someone at work is having a bad day I try to lighten up the mood and tell them I would gladly trade places with them.  They go home to relax and chill while my 2nd job without pay begins.

Sorry to hear that. I get pretty tired in the evening, but I value my time with my children even more.  I should have to begin with, but as a normal human, I sometimes need to be humbled.  I am also glad that they keep me moving and I usually fell better after being active with them.  I hope you get positive feedback from him.

 

When I was on STD from work, I was just finding out what I had and my wife became very positive and helped me a lot; it was a struggle before because she thought my apathy was toward her and it was actually PD making me so "flat".  I now realize my lack of expression was not usually positive feedback.

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I agree, I too have always wanted to get to the next step so to speak. I have often struggled with accepting that I may not be able to work until normal retirement age. Recently I have tried to focus more on ACHIEVING realistic short term goals. The stress is definitely a factor. The term I use with my boss is "this is only work, it's not as bad as real life." He knows briefly of my condition due to FMLA, but the realist in me finds it harder and harder to care about career achievements. The whole bucket list thing is starting to make a lot more sense to me than continuing to contribute to this whole capitalist/consumer nonsense.

That is pretty much where I am.  I noticed yesterday that I started to feel overwhelmed and couldn't think through it.  Then, I got more relaxed and I was easily able to get through it.  I wasn't like that before.  It is like a small panic attack or more like a state of hypoxia.

 

I once had training in an altitude chamber and they want you to feel the effect of hypoxia so you can see the warning signs before it is too late and you can no longer function.  They had us doing tasks on a piece of paper, and at one point, I kept looking at one problem and I couldn't think to answer it or felt like I was caught in a loop like when a computer program freezes on a task.  I put on oxygen at that point.  Now, it is a LOT like that when I get "stuck" on PD and doing too many things.

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I started working towards my MBA a few months before the first apparent symptoms started, and was diagnosed early during my 5th academic quarter (out of 8) for the program, so just over half way.  Being an engineer, I didn't get the MBA to just keep doing what I'd been doing.  I'd have gotten an engineering masters if I wanted to stay that course, but move up in salary grade (and hence pay).  I am still actively seeking a move up into the executive track.  I'm well aware of the pressures I'll be under during and after that move.  PD may rob me of that capability to handle that pressure, or it may not.  If it does, then at least I'll go down swinging rather than passively watch the ball sail over the plate.  If that happens then I will know it wasn't lack of effort that did me in.  In the mean time I'm doing all I can to live my life as much as possible as though I don't have PD.  I have not yet altered any life goal.  But I'm also sure as heck not going to cancel my disability insurance.  

That is admirable.  I tried my MS in SE years ago, but I now know that PD was getting in the way (I was no diagnosed yet).  So, I only got two classes done and dropped out of two.  I was pretty frustrated at the time.

 

I am not sure I could do that now, even while I am treated, with my job and 4 kids. 

 

I know I did go as far as I can go, and that is why I am at the point of accepting my limitations.  Although, I continue to strive to do my best.  I just have the satisfaction of knowing I did my best and I should realize what realistic goals are for me.  Maybe I can do more with therapy and treatment in the future.  I just don't need another trip to the ER. 

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Thanks all for the congrats on the MBA.  It was a slog, but other than the time it took away from other things not as challenging as I'd expected.  That said, I tell people I got my MBA in the evenings while working and with 4 kids and home and most go something like :shock:, followed by comments about how with no kids or 1-2 kids they can't see how to find the time.  They don't even know about the PD that went on top of it all.  Not trying to make myself out to be anything special here (I'm not), just pointing out that it's really about priorities and determination.  If you want it badly enough you'll find a way.  

 

A PWP I spoke with recently told me that PD is a disease that takes away opportunities.  He wanted to be a helicopter pilot but found that PD took away too much from him to do that.  While, eventually, I am sure that he is right that we all have things like that taken away from us by PD, for now I'm going to remain defiant and still go do what I have set as goals for myself and my family.  When I really can't do that anymore, then I'll find other goals.

Edited by stump
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We can only do so much in life.  Know your priorities and stick with your beliefs.  My aunt is a very smart woman.  She once told me she was fully capable of being a doctor when she was younger but chose not to.  Be realistic and true to yourself.  If I can do it all over again I would choose to be happy and free.

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Am I glad to see this today!  Just made it into work (about noon) and wasn't even sure I should be here today.  I'm not thinking clearly, like the oxygen deprivation you talked about, and am super fatigued.  But seeing everyone's else thoughts here, just knowing others are wrestling with the same issues, is going to get me through the day, so thanks for posting the topic and everyone thanks for sharing.

 

I was a senior exec in early stage startup when I was diagnosed 13 years ago in my early 40's.  For about 8 years it was easy to keep pushing, pushing, pushing because I could see these carrots that were going to make things easier when my symptoms got worse.  They was right there, so attainable, and so, except for meds, I just flat out ignored my diagnosis. I didn't let PD take any opportunities away.  I even started a couple side businesses that I think will be compatible with advancing PD.

 

But then symptoms grew a tad more pronounced.  They still were not affecting how hard I could push, they weren't really limiting me, but the diagnosis did.  Knowing I had PD did affect how far I reached with my career. I stayed through the reign of an extremely, extremely difficult CEO and didn't seek to move up a rung on the corporate ladder somewhere else because of PD.  It was before the ACA and I felt I could not leave and risk not getting insurance. And my symptoms, though not outwardly noticeable were to the point where I felt I would have to be honest with any potential new employer about my diagnosis.  

 

So I stayed at the startup when I really should have moved on and my career goals shifted from being about how far I moved up to how much and how I moved back.  Symptoms did not really affect my work output but I could see that they were going to. I could not totally deny having PD as I had for 8 years.  As the startup grew I gave up having direct reports and sticking my nose into everything and let the company move me off to the side. On good days it was tough, I was used to having a hand in everything, tending to every crisis, being in the direct line of fire.  I liked operating in 5th gear, not 2nd or 3rd. 

 

The startup has grown much slower than we all thought.  I'm still in it and I can still only see those carrots, haven't grabbed them yet  But there are days, like today, when I know that taking a step back out of the line of fire was the right thing to do, for me and for the company.  Yesterday I had a few issues that needed urgent attention, I had to be on my game like I used to be.  That worked for a few hours, not even a whole day. Even though I did not get in until 10 I was exhausted by 4:30.  There is no way I could have that kind of day 2 days in a row. 

 

The last 6 months things have gotten worse, mostly fatigue but also slow thinking.  Now I'm wrestling with what happens when I can't work enough for it to be worthwhile for the company to keep me around.  I realize how lucky I am with how accommodating they have been. But now I'm really not able to contribute much, I can't be counted on. Now my 'career goal' is not about handling the downshift in my career.  Now it's about just continuing to work as I struggle with the brain fog, slow thinking, freeze ups and overwhelming fatigue. I have 3 kids in college, the side businesses won't support me. I need the job. It's hard but I've got to find a way to be valuable enough to be worth keeping around.  I'm still pushing, pushing, pushing but the scale is vastly different, The goal is different.  It's not even that the goal isn't as high, it's just a whole different goal.  I still have a goal and I still push, but I measure things relative to my health, not the person I'm competing with for the next job.

 

Recently I saw a job posting that was perfect for non-PD me. I read it and noted without regret how great a job it would be if I didn't have PD.  But I do have PD so I can't beat myself up about not going for that job.  I can't change the PD, but I can change my goals so they are things that I can push for.

 

Thanks for letting me share

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I never really wanted to be the top dog at work or climb the highest ladder. When I was diagnosed I had just started a new job that gave me more flexibility I did not realize I would need at the time.

 

Since my dx I have reprioritized my life. I have decided that I am not going to stress out about work. Stick with the job I have work as long as I can and go from there. I have refinanced all my debts and my husband and I should have everything paid off with the exception of the house by 2019. Then we will go from there. I feel as if I could work for many more years. If I can, then great. If not I will adjust.

 

I know I sound laid back about the whole thing and I probably am. What is important to me now, is staying healthy, not stressing over things I cant control, and finding enjoyment in everyday.

 

Blessings

Adam

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I never really wanted to be the top dog at work or climb the highest ladder. When I was diagnosed I had just started a new job that gave me more flexibility I did not realize I would need at the time.

 

Since my dx I have reprioritized my life. I have decided that I am not going to stress out about work. Stick with the job I have work as long as I can and go from there. I have refinanced all my debts and my husband and I should have everything paid off with the exception of the house by 2019. Then we will go from there. I feel as if I could work for many more years. If I can, then great. If not I will adjust.

 

I know I sound laid back about the whole thing and I probably am. What is important to me now, is staying healthy, not stressing over things I cant control, and finding enjoyment in everyday.

 

Blessings

Adam

 

 

Am I glad to see this today!  Just made it into work (about noon) and wasn't even sure I should be here today.  I'm not thinking clearly, like the oxygen deprivation you talked about, and am super fatigued.  But seeing everyone's else thoughts here, just knowing others are wrestling with the same issues, is going to get me through the day, so thanks for posting the topic and everyone thanks for sharing.

 

I was a senior exec in early stage startup when I was diagnosed 13 years ago in my early 40's.  For about 8 years it was easy to keep pushing, pushing, pushing because I could see these carrots that were going to make things easier when my symptoms got worse.  They was right there, so attainable, and so, except for meds, I just flat out ignored my diagnosis. I didn't let PD take any opportunities away.  I even started a couple side businesses that I think will be compatible with advancing PD.

 

But then symptoms grew a tad more pronounced.  They still were not affecting how hard I could push, they weren't really limiting me, but the diagnosis did.  Knowing I had PD did affect how far I reached with my career. I stayed through the reign of an extremely, extremely difficult CEO and didn't seek to move up a rung on the corporate ladder somewhere else because of PD.  It was before the ACA and I felt I could not leave and risk not getting insurance. And my symptoms, though not outwardly noticeable were to the point where I felt I would have to be honest with any potential new employer about my diagnosis.  

 

So I stayed at the startup when I really should have moved on and my career goals shifted from being about how far I moved up to how much and how I moved back.  Symptoms did not really affect my work output but I could see that they were going to. I could not totally deny having PD as I had for 8 years.  As the startup grew I gave up having direct reports and sticking my nose into everything and let the company move me off to the side. On good days it was tough, I was used to having a hand in everything, tending to every crisis, being in the direct line of fire.  I liked operating in 5th gear, not 2nd or 3rd. 

 

The startup has grown much slower than we all thought.  I'm still in it and I can still only see those carrots, haven't grabbed them yet  But there are days, like today, when I know that taking a step back out of the line of fire was the right thing to do, for me and for the company.  Yesterday I had a few issues that needed urgent attention, I had to be on my game like I used to be.  That worked for a few hours, not even a whole day. Even though I did not get in until 10 I was exhausted by 4:30.  There is no way I could have that kind of day 2 days in a row. 

 

The last 6 months things have gotten worse, mostly fatigue but also slow thinking.  Now I'm wrestling with what happens when I can't work enough for it to be worthwhile for the company to keep me around.  I realize how lucky I am with how accommodating they have been. But now I'm really not able to contribute much, I can't be counted on. Now my 'career goal' is not about handling the downshift in my career.  Now it's about just continuing to work as I struggle with the brain fog, slow thinking, freeze ups and overwhelming fatigue. I have 3 kids in college, the side businesses won't support me. I need the job. It's hard but I've got to find a way to be valuable enough to be worth keeping around.  I'm still pushing, pushing, pushing but the scale is vastly different, The goal is different.  It's not even that the goal isn't as high, it's just a whole different goal.  I still have a goal and I still push, but I measure things relative to my health, not the person I'm competing with for the next job.

 

Recently I saw a job posting that was perfect for non-PD me. I read it and noted without regret how great a job it would be if I didn't have PD.  But I do have PD so I can't beat myself up about not going for that job.  I can't change the PD, but I can change my goals so they are things that I can push for.

 

Thanks for letting me share

Yes, good points and thanks for sharing!  

 

My wife asked us yesterday what we failed at (family discussion) and what we succeeded at.  I realized she would celebrate the failure because the good thing about it is that you tried something.  I also recall reading a motivational book that pointed out that we learn the most from our failures.  Yet, we cannot fail if we don't try, and of we don't try; we get nothing accomplished.

 

So, now I don't "beat myself up" like I used to.  I strive to be content with what I am and not worry what others measure my success with.  Sounds like several out there have come to the same realization.  Years of denying limitations are over.  Yet, that only means there are other things we can focus on or do.. just not how we planned life to go.  

 

I got really drained these last two hours.  I feel bad about not being efficient at work as I can be.  That is a good thing, I have an honest conscience.  I am just not going to spend hours stressing over it.

 

It is great to hear your thoughts! 

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This I struggle with this every. single. day.  I really miss all that I wanted out of life- a real, senior level career.  An MBA from a really good school so I could push myself.  It's a horrifying 180 degrees we undergo when diagnosed, to realize that the pushing will likely involve a wheel chair not a golf bag cart.  I used to be the primary wage earner, and that's what was supposed to fix our retirement situation.  Our retirement savings are way too low, as a result of the prolonged downturn and with the PD, it just doesn't make fiscal sense.  I don't have kids, so my husband and I were supposed to be able to have a pretty nice retirement, but all that's gone out the window.  We need to save every penny we can because I might get 5, 10, 20 years working or I could be done tomorrow.

 

Blame this on the day job.  I know in excruciating detail exactly how screwed my husband and I are.  I really feel horrible, because it will take a miracle if my husband ever gets to retire.   I work in personal financial services, so to hear "I'm afraid that it does looks like young onset Parkinson's disease", my mind immediately went blank with, "oh INAPPROPRIATE, I'm uninsurable.  (for LTC). you can still get Life insurance with PD, it's just more expensive. And, Disability is also a no, unless it's group sponsored, so it's not underwritten.

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I'm still working and hope to for a few more years.  My target retirement year is in 3 years and depending on how I'm doing, I much stretch it out to 5 if I'm feeling good.  Fortunately, I've accomplished everything I set out to achieve in my career and more.  I was the owner of small IT Consulting firm that was doing exceptionally well until the ".com" bust.  We weren't big enough to compete with the larger companies and the work eventually dried up. It didn't help that my brother bailed from the company and took a job.  That was rough having to take a step backwards but I was able to swallow my pride and start the rebuild of my career. After a few years, I rose to the position of CTO (Chief Technology Office) for a medical device/software company.  That was probably the most challenging years of my career.  As a CTO it consumed all of my time. When I entered the work force as a young man, I promised myself that I would never work so hard that I would neglect my family.  My Dad passed away when I was 9.   I have limited memories of him because he worked all of the time.  11 years ago, I remembered my promise to myself and took a cut and pay and returned to what I love doing the most.  I develop and maintain software systems for the government now.  I do my part in keeping America safe and I get to enjoy my family.  I'm finally in the sweet spot of my career.  I hope that everyone still working can reach their goals.

 

Good Luck.

 

Dave

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Thanks all for the congrats on the MBA.  It was a slog, but other than the time it took away from other things not as challenging as I'd expected.  That said, I tell people I got my MBA in the evenings while working and with 4 kids and home and most go something like :shock:, followed by comments about how with no kids or 1-2 kids they can't see how to find the time.  They don't even know about the PD that went on top of it all.  Not trying to make myself out to be anything special here (I'm not), just pointing out that it's really about priorities and determination.  If you want it badly enough you'll find a way.  

 

A PWP I spoke with recently told me that PD is a disease that takes away opportunities.  He wanted to be a helicopter pilot but found that PD took away too much from him to do that.  While, eventually, I am sure that he is right that we all have things like that taken away from us by PD, for now I'm going to remain defiant and still go do what I have set as goals for myself and my family.  When I really can't do that anymore, then I'll find other goals.

 

Way to go Stump!  PD is "just" part of life if you're willing and able to look at it that way.  The only constant in life IS change and it makes living a whole lot easier when we learn to "embrace impermanence" and keep looking for things we CAN do & want.  Sometimes we can't find ways to get what we think we really want, but what we can do is try to appreciate the things we have that we DO want & keep readjusting.  Often "easier said than done" but it's kind of like the lottery (which I don't play by the way) slogan - you can't win if you don't play!  Keep smiling and keep going, you're phenomenal.

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This I struggle with this every. single. day.  I really miss all that I wanted out of life- a real, senior level career.  An MBA from a really good school so I could push myself.  It's a horrifying 180 degrees we undergo when diagnosed, to realize that the pushing will likely involve a wheel chair not a golf bag cart.  I used to be the primary wage earner, and that's what was supposed to fix our retirement situation.  Our retirement savings are way too low, as a result of the prolonged downturn and with the PD, it just doesn't make fiscal sense.  I don't have kids, so my husband and I were supposed to be able to have a pretty nice retirement, but all that's gone out the window.  We need to save every penny we can because I might get 5, 10, 20 years working or I could be done tomorrow.

 

Blame this on the day job.  I know in excruciating detail exactly how screwed my husband and I are.  I really feel horrible, because it will take a miracle if my husband ever gets to retire.   I work in personal financial services, so to hear "I'm afraid that it does looks like young onset Parkinson's disease", my mind immediately went blank with, "oh INAPPROPRIATE, I'm uninsurable.  (for LTC). you can still get Life insurance with PD, it's just more expensive. And, Disability is also a no, unless it's group sponsored, so it's not underwritten.

Have you looked at the Patient Access Network?  There is financial help for PD patients having to spend $$$ on medicine.   http://www.panfoundation.org/index.php/en/

I got a card, for use at the pharmacy, to bill costs to them.

 

Fortunately, I was finally able to get VA medical support to reduce my costs, so I don't think I will need it this next fiscal year. 

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I am fortunate as I started to go up the "management ladder" I realized how much I missed being an Engineer.   Managing a group of 8-10 Engineers was a great challenge, and I loved the role of being a coach but corporate politics was a little to crazy. I had pretty much picked everyone on the team, but was told I could not turn in 10 people all being excellent (and eligible for highest wage increase) as only 1 to 2 could have "highest ratings" while 7 were average, and two "below expectations".   I turned in all 10 as excellent, and MY review was "below expectations".  Best thing I did was go to another company, and irony is that company doesn't exist any more. 

 

Thankfully my current company recognizes that people are its assets.  I've cut back on travel, but am still very technical so when Engineers in the field get a difficult issue, they contact me.  Always me the flexibility and to work around on/off times. Irony is I still have very good long term memory, but things I have learned in the last five years are harder to process, but quick review of technical documents and I can find what I am looking for.

 

Worth Mentioning: writemonkey dot com It is a very simple editor. Lets you clear the screen and just have  a simple editor up.   Often I need to write out a quick draft, and find I can wonder if too many tabs are open. So set a timer (20 minutes). Open write monkey and just start writing everything to be done.  After 20 minutes, go onto something else.  Later in the day I'll reopen that file, and flush it out a little more.  One those helpful tips.

 

Use your voice and google docs.   "OK Google, add [paper towels] to my shopping list"  Obviously Google Keep, but you can also do things like "OK google, Remind me to put laundry into the dryer in one hour".

Edited by TexasTom

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I'm curious how the folks still working handle the days when you're wiped out, can't process things fast, and you have a bunch of quiet, thoughtful work to do alone?  For me that's the scenario I really struggle with.  I can rally for a meeting or conversation, but when I have an in depth writing or reviewing project hours can go by and only minutes of work gets done.  Of course it doesn't help that when I'm relaxed I can sit still for hours.

 

When I first noticed this problem I started keeping a stash of candy and Coke nearby.  It worked but a few months but 20 lbs later I decided that was not the answer.  Sometimes a couple of minutes on Luminosity can jump start the brain but lately even that seems like too much coming at me too fast.

 

What is your way of staying on task?

Edited by pmf

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This is a great thread!

 

With my job, there's not much of a ladder to climb, so no loss there. However, there are certain tasks I find more difficult or unable to do. This causes me to be less assertive than I otherwise would be.

 

I've learned to accept my limitations; dwelling on them would only drag me down. I sometimes do attempt things I'm not sure I'll succeed at; this has led to insight about how exactly my condition is affecting my abilities, instead of just "I can't seem to do this anymore." This in turn helps me figure out what I need to do to make PD less intrusive in my life.

 

The best example is jugular venipuncture. Before diagnosis, over the course of several months, my skill had been declining, and I couldn't figure out why. After diagnosis, it occurred to me that the problem was pain/weakness in my right arm made it very difficult to hold off the vein so I could access it with the left. I never realized how much strength that took until I lost it. Recently, I've noticed that I tend to have success with the smaller animals; it obviously takes more strength to hold off the vein on a large dog.

 

So this month, I started Rock Steady Boxing in the hopes that it will abate my symptoms in general, but particularly to help the strength/dexterity in my right arm/hand. Last month, I saw an MDS who added to my medication regimen.

 

My career goal is basically to do whatever I can to stay in the game as long as possible and avoid an early, forced retirement. Fortunately, there's new ownership by a large corporation which means group LTD. Hopefully, I can stay long enough to be able to take advantage of that. MDS said I might be 2-3 years away from disability, but I don't take that as gospel. I love to be underestimated!

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I'm curious how the folks still working handle the days when you're wiped out, can't process things fast, and you have a bunch of quiet, thoughtful work to do alone?  For me that's the scenario I really struggle with.  I can rally for a meeting or conversation, but when I have an in depth writing or reviewing project hours can go by and only minutes of work gets done.  Of course it doesn't help that when I'm relaxed I can sit still for hours.

 

When I first noticed this problem I started keeping a stash of candy and Coke nearby.  It worked but a few months but 20 lbs later I decided that was not the answer.  Sometimes a couple of minutes on Luminosity can jump start the brain but lately even that seems like too much coming at me too fast.

 

What is your way of staying on task?

I sometimes do vitamin water.  Although. I think too much ginseng can make me a little dizzy sometimes.  I take Co-Q10; which helps (I take 3- 4x recommended dose).   B-12 works, but I did find out some PWPs can't process B-12 properly, so taking the L-5-MTHF version can make a huge difference. 

 

I still keep drinking diet sodas, but much less now.

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This is a great thread!

 

With my job, there's not much of a ladder to climb, so no loss there. However, there are certain tasks I find more difficult or unable to do. This causes me to be less assertive than I otherwise would be.

 

I've learned to accept my limitations; dwelling on them would only drag me down. I sometimes do attempt things I'm not sure I'll succeed at; this has led to insight about how exactly my condition is affecting my abilities, instead of just "I can't seem to do this anymore." This in turn helps me figure out what I need to do to make PD less intrusive in my life.

 

The best example is jugular venipuncture. Before diagnosis, over the course of several months, my skill had been declining, and I couldn't figure out why. After diagnosis, it occurred to me that the problem was pain/weakness in my right arm made it very difficult to hold off the vein so I could access it with the left. I never realized how much strength that took until I lost it. Recently, I've noticed that I tend to have success with the smaller animals; it obviously takes more strength to hold off the vein on a large dog.

 

So this month, I started Rock Steady Boxing in the hopes that it will abate my symptoms in general, but particularly to help the strength/dexterity in my right arm/hand. Last month, I saw an MDS who added to my medication regimen.

 

My career goal is basically to do whatever I can to stay in the game as long as possible and avoid an early, forced retirement. Fortunately, there's new ownership by a large corporation which means group LTD. Hopefully, I can stay long enough to be able to take advantage of that. MDS said I might be 2-3 years away from disability, but I don't take that as gospel. I love to be underestimated!

I had lots of dexterity problems too, but mine is on the left.  While peaking on my meds, dexterity is great.  Otherwise, I couldn't type and had to use voice recognition to communicate. Thankfully, my workplace bought the software for me to install on my desktop.  I used it for a while, but I improved enough that I don't usually need it now.  However, the next month is not guaranteed to be the same.

 

I actually saw a dog that had parkinsonian symptoms while I was at a Animal Clinic.  He was shuffling, slowly turning around, falling over, slow to react.. etc.. The owner was there to put it down. 

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I had lots of dexterity problems too, but mine is on the left.  While peaking on my meds, dexterity is great.  Otherwise, I couldn't type and had to use voice recognition to communicate. Thankfully, my workplace bought the software for me to install on my desktop.  I used it for a while, but I improved enough that I don't usually need it now.  However, the next month is not guaranteed to be the same.

 

I actually saw a dog that had parkinsonian symptoms while I was at a Animal Clinic.  He was shuffling, slowly turning around, falling over, slow to react.. etc.. The owner was there to put it down. 

 

 

I hope it wasn't a Golden Retriever.   With our Rescue group (For Goldens) one was a owner release as they "couldn't afford to keep the dog".  The dog has Parkinson's, but is doing well on medication (Oddly enough it affects young dogs).  

 

I finally cut all soda's from my diet.  Black Coffee (four cups) in the morning, water during the day, and one beer with dinner. Otherwise just water with meals.

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I hope it wasn't a Golden Retriever.   With our Rescue group (For Goldens) one was a owner release as they "couldn't afford to keep the dog".  The dog has Parkinson's, but is doing well on medication (Oddly enough it affects young dogs).  

 

I finally cut all soda's from my diet.  Black Coffee (four cups) in the morning, water during the day, and one beer with dinner. Otherwise just water with meals.

This poor dog was old and rescued.  The man was trying to manage care for the dog and couldn't afford the meds.  One day, he felt he got a look from the dog, that basically said "I'm done".  I have to admit, the dog looked fairly miserable. It was very skinny, built like a rat terrier, but bigger.  It seemed justifiable with the age, QOL, etc. 

 

I just didn't know dogs got Parkinson's.  Must be tricky to medicate them at the right dosage.

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