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Linda Garren

Good Books You've Read and Recommend

14 posts in this topic

I thought it might be nice to have a place to recommend any good books you've read lately.

 

I just finished four very good stories from Reader's Digest Condensed Books, Volume 5, 1997.  I'd like to recommend one that I just finished in it that had me on the edge of my seat, my body tensing, reading faster and faster in the last hour with my jaw clenched so tight that my teeth ended up hurting.  It took my breath away...and then it did again...and again...and again.  Any aviators on our forum would especially enjoy it if they have not already read it.  It is called Medusa's Child by John J. Nance.  One of the very, very best stories I've ever read!!

 

Reviews:  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/262982.Medusa_s_Child

Edited by Linda Garren
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Discovery Driven Growth (forget the author right now)

Hunting High Country Mule Deer (by Mike Eastman)

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The archaic revival - Terence McKenna

DMT the spirit molecule - Dr. Rick Strassman

Most of Hunter S Thompsons work is a good read

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Ray and Joan by Lisa Napoli. Biographies of The Man Who Made The McDonald's  Fortune and his third wife who gave it all away.  

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I'd love to hear Shaker Dave's and Stump's synopses of their books and what they most liked and/or got out of them.  :-)

 

And Roger, what drew you to the book you read?  And what did you most get out of it?

 

So interesting to hear the topics people choose. :-)

Edited by Linda Garren

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I identify books to read from those reviewed in the NY Times, Washington Post and The New York Review of Books...though less and less likely from this last which tends to the high brow technical and cultural tomes which I find simply too complicated to grasp due to my flagging ability to concentrate with PD.   Biographies follow a chronological theme and I've read several of late, ploddingly.

 

Ray Kroc, the McDonalds restaurant chain founder was an alcoholic who up until the end, at age 83,  drank only Early Times rot gut whiskey.     Nevertheless, his winning personality and uncanny ability to spot trends is credited with changing  the way America ate meals.  His world wide empire included 7500 franchised stores at the time of his death - Ray owned the ground on which many were built.  He orchestrated the entire hamburger and French fry process down to the most minute details as set forth in his rules manual for franchisees. His only biological heir predeceased him.  His third wife Joan, saw fit to donate most of  the McDonald's fortune to National Public Radio and the Salvation Army.  Ray also owned the Sad Diego Padres big league baseball team.  He was a small town kid growing up and was proud of the fact - hailing from the Chicago general vicinity.  He also credited his own invention, the multi-mixer

used to make six milkshakes at a time as helpful to his success.  Neither he or his wife ever went to college.    He left his half billion dollar estate to Joan, his third wife who became a philanthropist, full time before dying of lung cancer.  Both she and her husband were heavy, life long cigarette smokers.

Edited by Rogerstar1
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Thank you Linda for starting this thread.  Like Roger, I've had to "dumb down" my reading.  I recently read "When Breath Becomes Air" by Paul Kalanithi, and Atul Gawande's books.  Everything he writes fascinates me.  Gardener

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Thank you Linda for starting this thread.  Like Roger, I've had to "dumb down" my reading.  I recently read "When Breath Becomes Air" by Paul Kalanithi, and Atul Gawande's books.  Everything he writes fascinates me.  Gardener

 

Some excellent reviews on Kalanithi's book:   https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25614898-when-breath-becomes-air

 

and on Atul Gawande's books:  http://atulgawande.com/book/being-mortal/

Edited by Linda Garren

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Ray and Joan by Lisa Napoli. Biographies of The Man Who Made The McDonald's  Fortune and his third wife who gave it all away.  

 

I identify books to read from those reviewed in the NY Times, Washington Post and The New York Review of Books...though less and less likely from this last which tends to the high brow technical and cultural tomes which I find simply too complicated to grasp due to my flagging ability to concentrate with PD.   Biographies follow a chronological theme and I've read several of late, ploddingly.

 

Ray Kroc, the McDonalds restaurant chain founder was an alcoholic who up until the end, at age 83,  drank only Early Times rot gut whiskey.     Nevertheless, his winning personality and uncanny ability to spot trends is credited with changing  the way America ate meals.  His world wide empire included 7500 franchised stores at the time of his death - Ray owned the ground on which many were built.  He orchestrated the entire hamburger and French fry process down to the most minute details as set forth in his rules manual for franchisees. His only biological heir predeceased him.  His third wife Joan, saw fit to donate most of  the McDonald's fortune to National Public Radio and the Salvation Army.  Ray also owned the Sad Diego Padres big league baseball team.  He was a small town kid growing up and was proud of the fact - hailing from the Chicago general vicinity.  He also credited his own invention, the multi-mixer

used to make six milkshakes at a time as helpful to his success.  Neither he or his wife ever went to college.    He left his half billion dollar estate to Joan, his third wife who became a philanthropist, full time before dying of lung cancer.  Both she and her husband were heavy, life long cigarette smokers.

Reviews:  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/ray-joan-lisa-napoli/1123484469?type=eBook#productInfoTabs

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I identify books to read from those reviewed in the NY Times, Washington Post and The New York Review of Books...though less and less likely from this last which tends to the high brow technical and cultural tomes which I find simply too complicated to grasp due to my flagging ability to concentrate with PD.   Biographies follow a chronological theme and I've read several of late, ploddingly.

 

Ray Kroc, the McDonalds restaurant chain founder was an alcoholic who up until the end, at age 83,  drank only Early Times rot gut whiskey.     Nevertheless, his winning personality and uncanny ability to spot trends is credited with changing  the way America ate meals.  His world wide empire included 7500 franchised stores at the time of his death - Ray owned the ground on which many were built.  He orchestrated the entire hamburger and French fry process down to the most minute details as set forth in his rules manual for franchisees. His only biological heir predeceased him.  His third wife Joan, saw fit to donate most of  the McDonald's fortune to National Public Radio and the Salvation Army.  Ray also owned the Sad Diego Padres big league baseball team.  He was a small town kid growing up and was proud of the fact - hailing from the Chicago general vicinity.  He also credited his own invention, the multi-mixer

used to make six milkshakes at a time as helpful to his success.  Neither he or his wife ever went to college.    He left his half billion dollar estate to Joan, his third wife who became a philanthropist, full time before dying of lung cancer.  Both she and her husband were heavy, life long cigarette smokers.

I am looking forward to seeing the movie The Founder starring Michael Keaton as Kroc.

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Glad to see another Hunter Thompson fan here and I'm going to look into the title on Hunting Mule Deer.

 

I run a book club for some elderly ladies at an Assisted Living here on Cape Cod and we all recently read

Atul Gawande's Being Mortal. My wife and I enjoyed it immensely but it was badly received by my group

in general. The topic itself made them very uncomfortable.

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Up next for me to read is A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny, and The Lost Boy by Camilla Lackberg.

 

Hi, Pathfinder.  Glad to see you participating.  Can you tell us a little about each book and maybe forward a review on each?

 

If you would rather not, don't worry about it, though.  :-)

 

Take care.

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Glad to see another Hunter Thompson fan here and I'm going to look into the title on Hunting Mule Deer.

 

I run a book club for some elderly ladies at an Assisted Living here on Cape Cod and we all recently read

Atul Gawande's Being Mortal. My wife and I enjoyed it immensely but it was badly received by my group

in general. The topic itself made them very uncomfortable.

 

That's so nice that you do that for assisted-living group.  Did they suggest, or did you figure out, another book for them that they might be more comfortable with?

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